Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Facebook Post on Lori Dekervor --Toronto Star---Comments --------Annmarie Howard Unfortunately senior's homes are understaffed and this sort of thing happens more than we know. There definitely needs to be change but the families need to be there as often as possible and aggressively advocate for their loved one. How long was he malnourished before they noticed? If they visited him even once or twice a week surely they would have noticed his pain if the ulcer was there for a long time? If there was any wrongdoing on the part of Revera then they should be punished but the family bears some responsibility too. If they were seeking an inquest instead of suing it would seem less like greed was involved. A lawsuit won't change the way homes are run in this country, it will only make the family richer if they win...------- Jean Baker In the US, I guarantee it hits home. Operating licenses have been revoked. Professional nurses and physicians can be charged with negligence and willful negligence can lead to criminal charges. Visiting family and friends do make a difference, unfortunately. Family is not liable, they left their family member in the care of, I assume, a licensed facility. There is the whole issue of whether all pressure sores are avoidable...the skin is an organ. In the process of dying there is organ shutdown. Question is what did they do to prevent, who and how frequently was he assessed and how did they document and report. Did they let the family know. Did they change his care once noticed. What is/was status of other residents. Who does health inspection reports and what has been on those reports. Unlike · Reply · 3 · October 20, 2016 at 2:55pm-----------Julie Ali In Alberta, when we do advocate for our family members government sits on its rump and does nothing. Retribution occurs including eviction, banning and lawsuits. The Government of Alberta is fully aware of these punitive actions by the continuing care industry and is complicit with them in maintaining the silencing of families. This is an important lawsuit. It indicates to the industry that if government won't do the oversight, won't provide penalties or even provide autopsies, families will take action. This is the only action left to us if our elected representatives do not work on behalf of citizens. Like · Reply · 57 mins----------

https://m.facebook.com/torontostar/posts/10154690402296151

The family of Arthur (Ross) Jones says he suffered from malnutrition and dehydration, and he fell repeatedly when he couldn’t get help for simple tasks, like going to the washroom.

Lori Dekervor wants other families to join her lawsuit, alleging widespread neglect by nursing home chain Revera.
THESTAR.COM

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Annmarie Howard Unfortunately senior's homes are understaffed and this sort of thing happens more than we know. There definitely needs to be change but the families need to be there as often as possible and aggressively advocate for their loved one. How long was he malnourished before they noticed? If they visited him even once or twice a week surely they would have noticed his pain if the ulcer was there for a long time? If there was any wrongdoing on the part of Revera then they should be punished but the family bears some responsibility too. If they were seeking an inquest instead of suing it would seem less like greed was involved. A lawsuit won't change the way homes are run in this country, it will only make the family richer if they win...ore
Cathie Gallegos Chansamone Costanzo but if a care worker is hit unintentionally by a person with mental illness or dementia they will get the cops to charge them and kick them out. fire bad careworks charge them. this will not stop. to much self regulation in Canada is why this never stops.
Lisa Marie Cathie Gallegos Chansamone Costanzo that's not true. If a person has dementia or any other cognitive impairment they are not considered criminally liable. Where do you get your wacky info from?
Simon Shelly A lawsuit against a privately run institution will help put them out of business and make the others step up their game to avoid similar results
Marika Nagy Lisa Marie , she made it up , obviously...
Cathie Gallegos Chansamone Costanzo Lisa Marie The star has repoted on this before time and time again

Jean Baker
 In the US, I guarantee it hits home. Operating licenses have been revoked. Professional nurses and physicians can be charged with negligence and willful negligence can lead to criminal charges. Visiting family and friends do make a difference, unfortunately. Family is not liable, they left their family member in the care of, I assume, a licensed facility. There is the whole issue of whether all pressure sores are avoidable...the skin is an organ. In the process of dying there is organ shutdown. Question is what did they do to prevent, who and how frequently was he assessed and how did they document and report. Did they let the family know. Did they change his care once noticed. What is/was status of other residents. Who does health inspection reports and what has been on those reports.
Carlos Azevedo Cathie Gallegos Chansamone Costanzo wrong, maybe if a resident hits another resident, than maybe they will be removed from that home but never have I seen any action taken for resident action onto a staff, especially if is unintentional.
Carlos Azevedo Simon Shelly out of business? What about public spaces, they have similar situations. When has there ever been a resident care facility shut down. The waiting lists for these care beds is unbelievably long
Debbie Cameron BS^^^^
The care of residents is responsibility of home NOT family!!!! Don't place the blame on the innocent, smh!!!
Simon Shelly Carlos Azevedo I think the best we can hope for is the government would tighten its belt to prevent more laws suits.
Anita Bartlett Families are rare who take an active interest in their elderly loved one. Mostly they are ignored and visit very occasional. Sad to see them alone, by themselves, alone on Christmas day. Lots of pictures of family members on the wall, most live near by, but they do not bother and are not interested.
Julie Ali In Alberta, when we do advocate for our family members government sits on its rump and does nothing. Retribution occurs including eviction, banning and lawsuits. The Government of Alberta is fully aware of these punitive actions by the continuing care industry and is complicit with them in maintaining the silencing of families.
This is an important lawsuit. It indicates to the industry that if government won't do the oversight, won't provide penalties or even provide autopsies, families will take action. This is the only action left to us if our elected representatives do not work on behalf of citizens.
LikeReply57 mins
Julie Ali Simon Shelly Government will do nothing. Only the public will get change to happen.
LikeReply9 mins
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Genevieve Berg When there is one care worker to tend to 30 or more residents during the night, residents cannot be turned or changed as needed. It is impossible. Not to mention when you run short staffed, it puts pressure and stress on the workers and the ability to work together suffers. It is truly a terrible situation.
Kathryn Sauve-Uden At my fathers home , it was 1 per 15 at night. Still not enough
Jean Baker Is there any legal staffing requirements in Canada?
Sheryl Fallon I work nights and it's one psw for 32 residents, there is supposed to be a float that assists with the 4 units but more often than not, we run short.
Carlos Azevedo To much funding wasted on paper work/regulation not enough to direct care.
Carlos Azevedo Jean Baker depends on the province, but yes. However most facilities exceed minimal standards. Also if I'm correct they count all nursing staff on shift regardless of direct or indirect care.
Jodi Younglao Carlos Azevedo you are 100% right
Julie Ali Why do the executives at these businesses make major cash and we can't get enough staff for the residents? It's because in Alberta, government does not mandate staff:resident ratios. If they did do this it might impact the profits earned. 
In Alberta 
we have the push to put continuing care in the private sector--in the hands of not for profit and for profit businesses. This is because government is a bank and wants to provide as little money as possible to fund seniors in care. The public is indifferent, or when they do have a family member in the continuing care system are unable to get the stories to media. Every now and then a family speaks courageously of abuse, harm and death but one family cannot change a system that has been rooted in non-transparency for decades. What is required is for families to join up as they are doing in this lawsuit and kick butt. The lawsuit is not for the purpose of money. It's for the purpose of ending the silence and telling the truth. Our government in Alberta and Ontario and probably all over Canada is failing our most vulnerable seniors and handicapped folks in care. Why should we stay silent about poor performance? The court of public opinion will ensure folks who don't perform get voted out. We just did this with the PCs in Alberta. If the NDP folks don't perform we're going to vote them out in the next provincial election. Lawsuits and votes folks. That's the way to get change in the poor work of government.
LikeReply51 mins
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Mary Ailene As a former personal Support Worker who has spent 20 years working in Long Term Care( both private and public), I applaud you, and hope many do join your suit. We, the caregivers, know all about the neglect due to short staffing, but our complaints fall on deaf ears.It is going to take many families to unite and say enough is enough for them to be forced to pay attention and change the system.
Carlos Azevedo I hope you are right, but I don't think lawsuits is the answer. Companies taking profits from government funding is a problem, but it is accepted because the governments don't have to build the facilities themselves.
Julie Ali A single lawsuit is not the answer. Class action lawsuits are the way to go. A company might chalk up a single lawsuit as part of the costs of doing business. But no company wants a class action lawsuit--mainly because it kind of impacts their public image. Revera for example is now associated with abuse and death. We've had similar cases in Alberta. #ReveraAbuseDeath.
What are the provincial governments doing about Revera? Nothing. The health ministers in Alberta intone "Abuse will not be tolerated" when it is clear from the cases we hear that abuse is indeed tolerated; heck death is tolerated. What will change this junk is public awareness and this class action lawsuit will be productive in raising the consciousness of citizens all over Canada. I mean I heard of this case in Alberta.
LikeReply47 mins
Franca De Marco Vescio The Ministry of Health and Long Term Care has to inspect these homes more regularly (not just annually) and do so unannounced. Also, when violations are cited, homes should be slapped with large monetary fines so as to insure that they provide proper care to residents in the future and there are no further violations.
Anita Bartlett That money would come out of the nursing budget. Management wouldn't lose a dime. The home would be in worse shape with nursing care, laundry, housekeeping, dietary, all costs cut The residents would pay for it, not the owners
Franca De Marco Vescio So what do you propose as a penalty because writing up a violation and posting it to their website doesn't seem to change bad practices. Maybe loss of licensing is the next step but that would leave fewer beds in the system. A more severe form of punishment must be taken against nursing homes.
Julie Ali In Alberta the folks at Alberta Health and AHS fail completely at their oversight role. It's incredible we pay the staff so much and get so little auditing work done of value.
Families have to be the boots on the ground yapping day and night before gov
ernment folks get off their butts to do their jobs.
Even when they do the audits what penalties are there? We pay for AHS staff to mentor the staff from a state of non-compliance to compliance. It's a farce. There should be fines, licenses should be yanked and audits made public. Right now in Alberta the GOA can keep any audit private just because it is the government of Alberta. Why can't we see the audits of these places? Could it be that the audit results do not reflect well on the government of Alberta, AHS, Covenant Health and the continuing care industry?
LikeReply44 mins
Marianna Agostino I'm sorry for your lose. Understaffed is no excuse they are taking money to care for people. My dad died while waiting to get into a nursing home, hospitals are no better, we don't care about seniorsm. If I had to peny for ever Dr or nurse who reminded me how old they were an how busy. They might be busy but not doing the things we want them to, care for our loved ones. We have the wrong priorities it's a broken system, imagine by the time it's our turn? No one left to care. May your dad rest in peace, I miss my dad every day.
Franca De Marco Vescio You're absolutely right! Hospitals are no better when it comes to the elderly. Ministry of health and long term care does a horrible job ensuring proper care in both hospitals and long term care facilities
Anita Bartlett The nurses are short staffed and run off their feet. Its the owners or management who do not deliver the necessary staff to do the job.
Hiro Mac Government does not give enough money for long term care home to hire more staff to take care elderly. Usually 150 beds with 150 staff, and probably 90 people are nursing. Compare to sick kids hospital around 420 beds with over 8000 staff member.
Sofi Shmofi i'm always amazed too at the ratios of staff in pediatrics compared to geriatrics.
Carlos Azevedo Probably lots of donations!?
Julie Ali Seniors issues are not sexy. Kids issues are.
LikeReply30 mins
Aida Velasquez I don't understand this kind of culture where you have to get rid of your own parents and forget about them in those cold homes... In my culture we take care of our parents and we try our best to give them the most amazing last years of their life left...
I saw die my grandparents in our homes but I know they die happy knowing their family loved them till the end....
I cannot accept this kind of idea of forget about them after all they have done for us... 
Simply can't understand and approved.... !
RIP this gentleman, his soul now us better, calm and happy beside the angels, he will feel loved again.
Kathryn Sauve-Uden When you have a loved one who suffers from Alzheimer's , is violent thru no fault of their own. Then we can talk
Carlos Azevedo Yes but the longer you live the older your own children will be, if your ninety five or so you may have children who are seventy or so. Many elderly still live at home, but these are those with probably some serious health issues.
Marcia McCluskie You can disagree. Yet does your "culture" mind and body able to care for them. And financially you can just stay home and care for those needing 24/7 attention and help? Lucky you. I know personally help and placement would be my only option. I would not forget about them by any means. I would be there often after work to help etc. I know others that must as well. Our own age also plays a big factor. My husbands grandmother lived to 102 and her life ended in a home. Why? Because lots of family and no one could not work in Ontario to be home 24/7. She loves a good life and was taken care of great where she was. But Bills to pay and children to pay for. Life is expensive now days and homes are to help these families out. It is also paid for.
Aida Velasquez Marcia Friest-McCluskie, you sound more, like a materialist kind of person. You're more concern about things that when you die you won't take with you, like money, bills and material things... It is so sad that for you is more important superfluous thi...See More
Anita Bartlett Most nursing homes are caring and loving. You gave love and care to your elderly. You acted like family. To many elderly we are their only family. Many families are not interested Its these families who are cold. Its the nursing home that is safe, war...See More
Aida Velasquez Yeah, Anita Bartlett... That post we are comment about now, is all about it. I can see your point... No harm. (Sarcasm)
You can defend your point but I will hold mine up... 
Good for you !!
Julie Ali This is not a matter of culture. It's a matter of can you provide the level of care required. Sometimes you can. Sometimes you can't. Judging folks isn't nice.
LikeReply50 mins
Genevieve Berg Long term care homes are for profit businesses. They are not government funded. They have shareholders and stocks to maintain and grow. Once all the beds are filled in a home, the only way to increase profits is to cut costs...such as staff. That is why care is so poor. Governments give some money to LTC homes to help them meet the regulations, but really governments cannot interfere with profits.
Jean Baker Does not the government license and inspect and pay the bills????
Genevieve Berg They don't run the homes. And they certainly don't legislate an appropriate level of staffing. That would cut too deeply into profits.
Carlos Azevedo Not all are "for profit" but most.
Julie Ali The government in Alberta has deliberately abdicated it's responsibilities to seniors because it can do this. Families have not demanded that the GOA do its oversight job in the continuing care system. The GOA basically acts like a bank and hands money to the continuing care industry which is now mostly private for profit and not for profit companies. It's an indication of the future.
Government will not be able to take care of seniors in any useful way. The baby boomer generation will result in major problems beyond what is present. Best to understand that the government had basically given up in the area of seniors and continuing care all over Canada .
LikeReply27 mins
Suzy Crawfish Advocate for your parents. Become familiar with their rights as care home residents. Visit the home as often as you can, at different times of the day and in the evening. Get to know the staff and the other residents and introduce yourself to the managers. Be observant. Be helpful. Express any concerns in a firm, yet nonbelligerent manner. Yes, care homes are for- profit businesses, but all homes are subject to provincial regulations and must adhere to them.
Carlos Azevedo Choose a "not for profit facility" if there is one in your area. The tricky part is that those families that demand better care usually will come at the expense of some other resident living in that same facility, unfortunately.
Julie Ali A for profit may sometimes be better than an underfunded not for profit.
LikeReply29 mins
Liana Schill There is a shortage of good seniors homes, so for in one to go out of business by bankrupting them through a lawsuit doesn't help. It is much better to set higher standards for Seiniors care, camera monitoring, drug- dispensing oversight, surprise inspections, etc.
Anita Bartlett Much better idea. Public image will be effective to get owners and managers to staff properly.
Liana Schill I think the study of gerontology in Canada must expand to accommodate good education on managing a growing need for excellent seniors care in the next few years. With seniors, there are levels of decline as one ages. Each level has it's own challenges depending on the physical and mental capacity of the patient. Also, country-wide standards should be set for staffing needs, care routines, medication dispensing, and most importantly, carefully monitored for adherence. Promising too much is a problem with the profit-generating side of the seniors home business.
Julie Ali In Alberta there is no interest in beefed up oversight since the poor oversight already present indicates that the government isn't doing its oversight job properly.
Higher standards don't work if there is no proper auditing, follow up and penalties.
I
t's ridiculous to assume everyone will travel at the speed limit when we know some folks will speed so why do we assume that just having higher standards will fix this leaky boat of horrors? In Alberta we've had the spin that we have best in the world regulation of the oil and gas industry and yet for 44 years there were two spills per day without any of us knowing about this junk. Similarly in the child welfare system they were telling us that everything is fine and now we find out that there are greater than 800 dead kids in the care of the GOA. The standards need to be connected to consequences of worth. The GOA could start by publishing all audits and doing it immediately to include their retroactive audits.
LikeReply47 mins
Flo OConnell Bridge point killed my mom. Won't take her to the bathroom... When she tried to go on her own she fell broke her hip arm and shoulder they left her on the floor for hours and took another 10 hours to get xrays...she died 10 days later
Anita Bartlett I am so sorry for you and your mom. She suffered needlessly. She was in pain. Thats torture
Kathryn Sauve-Uden I wonder how often she was there to visit her dad? I wonder if she was so concerned for those 11 months. Or did the family just drop him off and come by , you know, when they had time ? Why was her Dad in the home? So many questions. While I agree some nursing homes are not up to speed as they should be, I also had a father in long term care. Between my sisters and I ( more my sisters than me) we visited my dad 5 out of 7 days a week. We were on 1st name basis with the staff. My dad fell all the time. Why? Because he had Alzheimer's, and forgot to use his walker. Forgot to ask for help. These homes do not provide one on one care. Want that for your loved ones. Hire a private nurse, and keep them at home
Jean Baker The article states family was in San Diego. He was from Etobicoke. I would bet his Canadian coverage, if it covers long term care, does not cover him out of country and family would have to private pay if they would even accept him here. Family may have jobs or one in military at big naval base there. Huge dilemma for families. May he rest in peace...
Kathryn Sauve-Uden Jean Baker Canadian Health coverage does not cover long term care, his pension would subsidize it, but thats all, it would cover all his medical needs , drs etc, but not the home inself, they are privately run
Anita Bartlett Thank you for understanding. You were a committed family. Rare. Some, only some, families are like yours. Most families never, or very rarely even bother. Sad to see this. They die with us at their sides. To some, we are their family and without our living care, they would be totally alone. Couldn't even imagine
Kathryn Sauve-Uden Anita Bartlett we saw that all too often. Some residents had no one ever visit 😔
Julie Ali Lori trusted the system. She lives in the USA. She spoke to him. But she trusted the folks in charge of the place. 
Sometimes families are naive about this sort of stuff. I know I was.
I trusted the professionals as well.
LikeReply38 mins
Kathryn Sauve-Uden Sorry Julie, I wouldn't trust my dog with strangers. She should have had made arrangements to have him closer to her
LikeReply35 mins
Julie Ali Kathryn Sauve-Uden I don't judge her. I have had my sister in the continuing care system in Alberta for five years. If you are the trusting sort you would believe the system over your own family members. When professionals are all saying one thing how do you believe that there is something amiss until you have proof of an irrefutable sort such as test results or a camera recording problems?
LikeReply12 mins
Sheryl Fallon I work nights in long term care, I'm responsible for 32 residents as well as charting. It is virtually impossible to do all that is necessary for these residents. The worker:resident ratios need to change. I keep saying I'm going to write a book on what really happens at these places but suffice it to say they are the worst possible place to put a loved one unless family are prepared to be there and be a significant part of the care team. There are lots of great and compassionate workers but all you need to do is the math. I'm lucky if I can get through my 2 rounds let alone anything extra. And I'm sorry but reading this article and the reference made to "filthy and foul smelling wheelchairs and walkers", seriously??? Why can't the families keep these clean? Families need to take a role as well. I'm sad to say that while it is very sad how this person died, it happens all the time. Falls happen all the time too. Residents are found without vitals and it is unknown how long they were like that. There are residents supposed to be checked hourly and lots of residents that are supposed to be repositioned every 2 hours. It's impossible to do these things. Charting is a joke and I'd bet anything that this man's chart showed him being repositioned every two hours. I don't agree with this $200 million in damages, that just makes the family look greedy, but I applaud them for bringing this out into the open. Long term care has been needing an overhaul for a long time now. People don't deserve to live like this, particularly our most vulnerable.
Carlos Azevedo To much profit taking and too much paperwork to justify required funding for so little staffing levels.
Liana Schill Thank you for your response, Sheryl Fallon! I see the problem as a management issue. Insufficient staffing is a big one. There is also a gap in expectations between the family of the senior and the nursing home. Some seniors advance into greater need for care as their conditions decline over time. How is this evaluated and communicated to the family?
Sheryl Fallon Liana Schill I am new to this company but not new to the field, so I can't really answer how management deals with increased resident needs. I am if the understanding that those issues are managed by the DOC and administrator, as well as the care team. I do know the unit I am on has increased needs and I know management is supporting me, however, staffing ratios are government mandated. I have communicated with my supervisors via email and they are very supportive. Part of the problem is staff calling in sick last minute or not being able to find our "float" person who is supposed to help all 4 units on rounds. It's sad that some staff have figured out the system and they're not there for the benefit of the residents but rather working nights can be an easy paycheque as there is little supervision. I have always maintained that family doesn't always understand how these homes work or that they have an obligation to be part of the care team. This needs to change and I will not stop talking about it as long as I have a voice.
Julie Ali While I understand that it is impossible to do everything maybe the facilities could do more if the staff:resident ratios were better? Maybe we could have staff trained to deal with more complex cases? Maybe we could have integrated care teams that could provide support? There could be more on call staff for problem times. It's easy to solve these problems but if there is no interest by the companies and the government well then these problems persist. I don't think families are being unrealistic about what we want for care.
In Alberta we have the so called standards of care. We want the standards of care being met rather than encountering flagrant non-compliances. This junk has been going on for too long in Alberta and it needs to change.
More staff, better trained staff and more money directed at resident care are all solutions to these problems. We don't even know how much of our public tax dollars go to the front line staff and resident care. We do know that the top tier executive staff make big bucks and profits can be immense. Profits that come from our tax dollars.
LikeReply22 mins
Tricia Mancuso Does not make those who are getting older consider trusting a care home to look after them properly despite the high cost they pay to live there. I'd rather live in my own home and have a companion look after me instead. I'd get better service. The government needs to look into this situation as many more seniors will be needing daily help.
Kathryn Sauve-Uden There are many programs available like this. Meals on wheels, CCAC, private PSW's
Carlos Azevedo A companion for 24 hours a day? I think that may be out of reach for most people. Not all homes are bad, unfortunately the good ones have a long waiting list.
Kathryn Sauve-Uden Carlos Azevedo and the good ones don't get the media exposure, only a shocking story makes the news. The wonderful staff and nurses are rarely recognized for what they do day in and day out. Special people do these jobs ❤️
Franca De Marco Vescio To live in your own home would be great but it all depends on your medical needs.
Carlos Azevedo Kathryn Sauve-Uden tell me about sister, I've been into long term care for 30 years and counting, not in nursing but we are in this together. We have mostly good people and some that need some tweaking but we'll get there.
Carlos Azevedo Franca De Marco Vescio my understanding is that most people remain in their homes throughout their lives. Most entering into long term facilities are coming in at a later stage in life and with more health issues than ever before.
Bonnie Cull-Vautour They drug them up so they dont have to deal with them. I saw it at the home where my grandfather stayed. At the end he refused food and water, essentially killing himself to get out of that hellhole. Makes me so angry that such a great man like him died this way.
Anita Bartlett Not eating or drinking, is part of the dying process. Drugs are used only through doctors, and power of attorney are involved. So for your grandfather, his power of attorney, was notified of all medications and as to why. The power of attorney has the right to say no, unless its pain medication
Top Comments is selected, so some replies may have been filtered out.
Nc Wan When my father was in the nursing home, we had a help stay with him daytime. Fed him cleaned him massaged him wash him changed his diaper, took him out on sunny days and he was happy even he had alzehmir which he couldnt really understand. I told the help if he slept u rested or did whatever u want, as long as making sure he was well taken care of. We as family memebrs would spend around 2 hours taking turns to feed him dinner, and tucked him in bed then went home. But he was cared very well and staffs there were happy as we helped to relieve their pressures of caring all many patients. So he was and we were all very welcomed. This is what u should do ! Dont expect your little petty money from the government could care your parents !! At least go every other days or weekends to be around with your elderlys so they wouldnt be alone and abandoned!! I had seen those stupid ppl never came and might show once a month with all excuses why they couldnt show blah blah blah and did nothing at all ! Now family wants suing for money?? screw them !! NO matter what...still have your own responsibilities ! What do u expect? Strangers to care for your elderlys? USe your brain
Anne Griffin I agree with your comment (I work in a nursing home) but not everyone has family or sometimes they are working or have families of their own to look after. I never had children, so if I end up in a nursing home, I will be at the mercy of the staff.
Julie Ali Some of the people in the continuing care system have elderly family members who are not able to do what you suggest. In addition, they might also not have the money to hire extra help.
When we pay taxes, we expect that there is a certain level of serv
ice.
Why should we hire private help to do the work that the companies are making profits from? Why can't we have adequate care of loved ones? Why should there be differential care based on economic standard? 
In some cases, there are many folks needing care. Eg my sister is in the continuing care system in Alberta but I also have two parents in their eighties who need help.
LikeReply34 mins
Josephine McClelland Old age homes are horrible. They don't look after old people yet if you had them at home you would be slapped with abuse and they get off scott free.
Kathryn Sauve-Uden I researched over 50 LTC facilities, some are gross for sure. The majority were lovely, clean and had great programs
Julie Ali Some of the nursing homes do not have well trained staff. Some of them are not up to the standards.
But we don't know in Alberta because the audits are not published.
We have to find out by entering these homes.
LikeReply33 mins
Josephine McClelland I do not need to do any research I experienced it first hand my father was over medicated to the point where he could not even eat and was dehydrated. And yes if we did what they do we would be behind bars it takes little training to know when you get too much medication you sleep all the time and it takes little training to know if you eat every few hours you have to use the bathroom yet patients sit in soiled diapers.
UnlikeReply125 mins
Debbie Cameron Class action lawsuit 
Finally the public is fighting back, our seniors deserve better!
Julie Ali This is indeed a good thing. I applaud Lori Dekervor for her courage in doing this.
In Alberta, retribution ensures the silencing of families.
LikeReply32 mins
Jodi Younglao There should
Not be any ltc homes for profit. The residents get less to make profits. Less staffing less activation ect.
Simon Shelly Nobody should he allowed to profit from the suffering of others
Morgan Hunter Where was the Family? Why did they allow this to happen?
Julie Ali The family lived in the USA. They were in contact but they trusted the facility.
LikeReply32 mins
Elena Pezzutto Here's a thought: Take care of your own elderly parents at your home, instead of putting them into "care" homes.
Aida Velasquez Exactly !! Thank you !!! 👍
Jill Pilcher Not always an option. I work in a home. Family after family tells me the home was the last option. 
And stories like this one give all homes a bad reputation 
Cathy Cody My mom was cared for at home until it was no longer safe - she'd leave the stove elements on with oven mitts resting atop, would get stuck in the bathroom unable to move. Unless you have actually cared for the individual, make no judgement. Their choice to live in a mild climate in BC vs my husband's job on the east coast - didn't allow me any options to care for her myself. the quality of care received by both my mom (parkinsons) and my dad (stroke) in nursing homes .. at different times, was excellent. your comment is short sighted.
Lyn Wood My mom lived at home with me and my family the last 2 years she was alive. I would never put her in a home for years. She passed peacefully in my arms.
Marcella Corroeli Jager Having elderly live with you at home is of course ideal - and easier if one adult can stay home with them, but if all the adults need to work then a psw needs to be hired - less expensive and possibly better care than a residence if basic assistance is required - but the higher the level of assistance (needing medical care) the higher the cost - at this point residential care can be the only option. Every situation and family is different - don't be too quick to judge.
Carlos Azevedo What happens when your parents are 90 plus and your seventy plus?
Julie Ali It is hard to take care of elderly people with demanding health needs. For example my sister is in continuing care and she needs to be checked every two hours at night and day. She needs to be in a facility but we bring her home on visits.
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Suzanne Leblanc Fortin One never gets the care they pay for (private or public) in hospital or nursing home. Hence the reason a strong advocate is required at bedside of a loved one. Not right but a fact!
Beverly Carleton I totally believe this. My mom died of complications from a broken hip even though she was unable to stand or walk and didn't ever try to. She was only lifted with a lift. Broke my heart.
Ran Reoiytr service Canada website is down for the third day causing trouble to millions of canadaians
Heather Marsh HOW do we reach this woman and this reporter?
Jean Baker RIP, poor man....
Liana Schill Why did she not attend to her own father?
Julie Ali She did but she trusted the facility.
LikeReply26 mins

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