Wednesday, March 8, 2017

--The report said the province also needs to create a single repository for serious incident reports, abuse investigation findings and family complaint files because critical information is often not shared among various areas of AHS and Alberta Health. The review team were told of several instances where AHS managers only learned of abuse investigations completed by department officials after they were reported on by the media. “This significantly limits the ability of the continuing care system to identify analyze and trend safety issues,” said the HQCA report, “and thus significantly hampers effective quality and safety management.”------------The NDP and Wildrose parties said everyday Albertans are reaping the confusion sown by Horne and the creation of AHS. “They created a system where they put layers and layers and layers upon layers of bureaucracy, and nobody is talking to each other,” said Wildrose critic Kerry Towle. “What we really have in this system is a bunch of people covering their butts all the time, and it doesn’t put the clients’ needs first.” NDP critic David Eggen said centralizing health regions without carving out lines of authority has actually worsened health care. “Alberta Health Services has been a failed experiment and very expensive,” said Eggen. “It seems like everyone’s responsible, and no one’s responsible.”------------- Julie Ali Just now · Snow in a light drizzle over the pancakes of road. I am going over data card downloads. What are data card downloads? They are BIPAP machine records of compliance data. The BIPAP machine keeps Rebecca breathing at night. Without it she collects carbon dioxide and develops carbon dioxide narcosis. I don't have all the compliance data for years because no one seems to have done very much work on this area despite the many hospitalizations. I am working on the compliance data because Rebecca cannot tell me what she went through -but the machine can. This is why some sort of oversight by family is essential. Either a camera or a machine recording of some sort will provide a sort of history of care at a place.-----



Snow in a light drizzle over the pancakes of road. I am going over data card downloads. What are data card downloads? They are BIPAP machine records of compliance data.
The BIPAP machine keeps Rebecca breathing at night.
Without it she collects carbon dioxide and develops carbon dioxide narcosis.
I don't have all the compliance data for years because no one seems to have done very much work on this area despite the many hospitalizations.
I am working on the compliance data because Rebecca cannot tell me what she went through -but the machine can.
This is why some sort of oversight by family is essential.
Either a camera or a machine recording of some sort will provide a sort of history of care at a place.
When you have family members who have insight maybe you are able to get by without such third party oversight but even so I would be present at the facility. Our experiences as a family indicate to us that the government of Alberta has not been doing the work of oversight properly. I am still not clear who has responsibility for what in the care of my handicapped sister in the system. According to the Health Quality Council chatter-everyone is responsible but no one is responsible.
 This is the same sort of situation in the foster care system. I guess the talk is good but the reality is quite different.
But of course y'all won't know what families are yapping about until you go into the system.
http://globalnews.ca/…/confusion-in-alberta-continuing-car…/
June 5, 2014 11:36 am Updated: June 5, 2014 6:06 pm
Confusion in Alberta continuing care: report
By Dean Bennett The Canadian Press
EDMONTON – There is confusion, duplication, and questions over who’s accountable for what in Alberta’s continuing care system, the province’s health watchdog reported Thursday.
Charlene McBrien-Morrison, executive director of the Health Quality Council of Alberta, told a news conference in Calgary that there is confusion not only among the providers, but within them as well.
“Quality and safety management in continuing care lacks clarity in roles, responsibilities, and accountabilities among the Ministry of Health, Alberta Health Services, and contracted providers,” said McBrien-Morrison.
“Within Alberta Health Services alone there is a similar lack of clarity regarding roles and responsibilities in continuing care.”
**
She also mentions the fact that no central office is tracking adverse events and fatalities because perhaps no one wants to track these events. Auditing is a joke. And will continue to be a joke:
She said the current audit system needs work.
“There are duplication of auditing processes, audits and standards often overlap or address the same issues, and there are many, many types of audits,” she said.
She said the system is also hampered by a crazy quilt of multiple surveys and questionnaires to gauge feedback from those who use the system.
“It makes it difficult to consistently assess the client and family experience,” she said.
There is also no centralized system to record and track safety issues, she said.
“This significantly impacts the ability of the continuing care system to identify and analyze safety issues.”
***
In my opinion this poor situation has been ongoing because the PCs had no interest in the care of our most vulnerable citizens until their jobs were on the line and we booted them in the last election. What is true of the PCs will be true of the NDP. When their jobs are on the line they will do some superficial work such as hire the Seniors Advocate to indicate to the seniors that --something is being done.
But what actually is being done?
Nothing.
So this means families have to be the ones in charge of the oversight of our family members . But again, you are all innocent. When your family member enters care you won't know what it's all about until you get the medical records. When you do get the medical records look at the facts. These facts will tell of system wide failures where everyone is responsible but no one is responsible. What this situation is all about-- is a system that is broken.

Alberta's health watchdog says there's confusion, duplication, and questions over who's accountable for what in the continuing care system.
GLOBALNEWS.CA

LikeShow more reactions
Comment


Health watchdog calls for better oversight of care facilities

MATT MCCLURE, CALGARY HERALD  06.06.2014
Health Minister Fred Horne. (Edmonton Journal/Files)
Health Minister Fred Horne. (Edmonton Journal/Files)ED KAISER / EDMONTON JOURNAL
Health Minister Fred Horne. (Edmonton Journal/Files)
Health Minister Fred Horne. (Edmonton Journal/Files)ED KAISER / EDMONTON JOURNAL
Oversight of patient safety in Alberta’s $1.4 billion continuing care system is difficult because providers are not forced to sign a standardized agreement or required to seek outside accreditation, says the province’s health watchdog.
A new report by the Health Quality Council of Alberta says Alberta Health Services needs to promptly decide who at the provincial health authority is responsible for ensuring nursing homes, supportive living facilities and home care contractors deliver quality treatment to over 120,000 clients.
“Responsibility for monitoring continuing care contracts is held in various AHS departments, resulting in an ‘everybody is responsible” situation,” the report said.
“The risk in this kind of approach is that ‘nobody is responsible’.”
The HQCA review was ordered by Health Minister Fred Horne last year in the wake of media reports about missed visits to home care clients in Edmonton and allegations of neglect of residents at a long term care facility in Calgary.
For example, the Herald uncovered two cases last December where residents of McKenzie Towne Care Centre died after developing blood poisoning from massive bedsores.
Investigators with the quality council discovered 20-year-old contracts — inherited by AHS when it was created in 2008 — meant that three-quarters of supportive living facilities, two thirds of home care sites and one quarter of nursing homes were not required and had not bothered to seek accreditation by an outside agency.
“AHS is in the process of moving all new and existing service providers towards a master services agreement and service schedules that will be consistent across the province,” the report said.
“However, moving legacy contracts to the new MSA has been difficult and is taking longer than originally expected.”
Health Minister Fred Horne told reporters Alberta will soon require all facilities and home care providers to be get a third-party seal of approval.
“Providers in future that do not meet national standards will not be welcome to deliver care to seniors in our province,” Horne said.
The watchdog team also found redundancy in the audits of providers, a problem first pointed out in 2005 by Alberta’s auditor general.
A facility might undergo five on-site inspections for compliance with bathing and water temperature standards by different staff at AHS or the department within the same year.
“There are duplications of auditing processes, audits and standards often overlap or address the same issues, and there are many, many types audits,” HQCA executive director Charlene McBrien-Morrison said.
“Auditing should be done by a group that is removed from front line or Alberta Health Services operations.”
New Democrat health critic David Eggen said the report shows that AHS has been an expensive failure, six years after its creation through a merger of regional health authorities.
“(It) paints a clear picture of the chaos and confusion,” Eggen said.
“There was never a clear delineation of responsibility.”
Horne said the government accepted the HQCA’s finding that there was both a lack of arm’s length oversight and an abundance of duplication in the care audit system.
“It’s not clear where the buck stops,” he said.
“Effective immediately, the Ministry of Health will assume the responsibility for quality monitoring and reporting.”
While inspections that examine whether a facility meets accommodation guidelines are posted online, the HQCA said those audits that measure compliance with health and safety standards should also be made public so families can make better-educated choices on where to house their loved ones.
The report said the province also needs to create a single repository for serious incident reports, abuse investigation findings and family complaint files because critical information is often not shared among various areas of AHS and Alberta Health.
The review team were told of several instances where AHS managers only learned of abuse investigations completed by department officials after they were reported on by the media.
“This significantly limits the ability of the continuing care system to identify analyze and trend safety issues,” said the HQCA report, “and thus significantly hampers effective quality and safety management.”
mmcclure@calgaryherald.com
With files from Darcy Henton

http://globalnews.ca/news/1376486/confusion-in-alberta-continuing-carereport/


June 5, 2014 11:36 am
Updated: June 5, 2014 6:06 pm

Confusion in Alberta continuing care: report

By Dean Bennett The Canadian Press
- A A +
EDMONTON – There is confusion, duplication, and questions over who’s accountable for what in Alberta’s continuing care system, the province’s health watchdog reported Thursday.
Charlene McBrien-Morrison, executive director of the Health Quality Council of Alberta, told a news conference in Calgary that there is confusion not only among the providers, but within them as well.

RELATED

“Quality and safety management in continuing care lacks clarity in roles, responsibilities, and accountabilities among the Ministry of Health, Alberta Health Services, and contracted providers,” said McBrien-Morrison.
“Within Alberta Health Services alone there is a similar lack of clarity regarding roles and responsibilities in continuing care.”
She spelled out problems in a number of areas, starting with no standardized system for handing out contracts to service providers.
She said the province needs to put all contracts under one master template and that “Alberta Health Services make explicit where the responsibility and accountability for continuing care contract compliance monitoring and oversight resides.”
She said the current audit system needs work.
“There are duplication of auditing processes, audits and standards often overlap or address the same issues, and there are many, many types of audits,” she said.
She said the system is also hampered by a crazy quilt of multiple surveys and questionnaires to gauge feedback from those who use the system.
“It makes it difficult to consistently assess the client and family experience,” she said.
There is also no centralized system to record and track safety issues, she said.
“This significantly impacts the ability of the continuing care system to identify and analyze safety issues.”
Health Minister Fred Horne, at a news conference in Edmonton, said he accepts all the recommendations and has begun acting on them.
“We will require in Alberta all continuing care facilities and home care providers to meet nationally accredited health care standards,” said Horne.
Horne said a number of facilities already meet those standards, but said in the past it wasn’t mandatory. He said his department will immediately take over monitoring to ensure quality care.
In a separate report, the council also said that those who need the care should have some degree of choice in determining the option that’s best for them.
The government has been criticized for forcibly separating married seniors by placing them in distant care centres under a first available bed policy.
Critics labelled the policy cruel, calling it “divorce by nursing home.”
The province is promising changes to work with the patients and their families to get patients into the closest available bed in their home community and keep couples together whenever possible.
Horne’s department is responsible for health policy while AHS handles day-to-day health care delivery.
AHS was created in 2008 to replace all regional health boards on the philosophy that centralized management would reduce waste and duplication, save money, and improve service.
However, AHS has struggled with wait times, faced accusations of doctors being abused by administrators, and frequent staff turnover at the executive level.
The NDP and Wildrose parties said everyday Albertans are reaping the confusion sown by Horne and the creation of AHS.
“They created a system where they put layers and layers and layers upon layers of bureaucracy, and nobody is talking to each other,” said Wildrose critic Kerry Towle.
“What we really have in this system is a bunch of people covering their butts all the time, and it doesn’t put the clients’ needs first.”
NDP critic David Eggen said centralizing health regions without carving out lines of authority has actually worsened health care.
“Alberta Health Services has been a failed experiment and very expensive,” said Eggen.
“It seems like everyone’s responsible, and no one’s responsible.”


No comments:

Post a Comment