Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Julie Ali · University of Alberta I agree with this family. If you don't have a background in medicine you would believe everything that you are told. Best to go to the medical notes and review the history. We did this in the case of my handicapped sister. We found out that doctors at the Grey Nuns Hospital had put "Do Not Resuscitate", "Do not intubate" and "No ICU" on her file due to repeated hospitalizations. They offered the family no reasonable explanation for these orders. For five years, we contested this order by the hospital. Other hospitals backed this order and it was only an ethicist brought in by AHS who indicated to the doctors that perhaps the unseemly haste to dispose of a severely handicapped woman who could be restored to life was perhaps not the right thing to do--resulted in the doctors budging a bit. The DNR order was not appropriate and was the response of a system to a patient they deemed to be non-compliant. This begs the question, that if this was the case then, why didn't the doctors ask for the establishment of a compliance program rather than making a premature termination decision? I'd say it was cheaper to do the DNR than the work of establishing appropriate supports, services and care for a complex care patient. The fact of the matter is that doctors and nurse are human beings. They get fed up and make expedient decisions. No one did the work up required to validate the DNR such as investigate; I had to do the work for the system. It is important for advocates to review the medical files and determine if inappropriate decisions are being made when there are life and death decisions at stake. You can't come back from dead and in my sister's case, because we fought for her resuscitation, she is now alive and living in a supportive living site in Edmonton, Alberta. If she did not have advocates with a medical background who understood medicine, she would not be with us today. In life and death matters, let the family decide. Like · Reply · Just now · Edite


Families should not have to go to court to ensure the lives of family members who are considered brain dead.
Why can't we have such decisions made by families? Why do we have to go to court or go through years of yapping about DNR orders to the health authorities?
Why is there no respect for advocates, family and citizens?
A Vancouver woman has won a temporary court order preventing St. Paul’s Hospital from taking her young husband off life support. On Nov. 11, Onkarbir Singh Toor,…
VANCOUVERSUN.COM


Ridiculous that families have to go through this junk to save the lives of family members:



Wife granted temporary court order preventing St. Paul's Hospital from ending life support for her husband

Published on: November 15, 2016 | Last Updated: November 15, 2016 5:42 PM PST
Crosses adorn St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver.
A Vancouver woman has won a temporary court order preventing St. Paul's Hospital from taking her young husband off life support.GERRY KAHRMANN / VANCOUVER SUN
A Vancouver woman has won a temporary court order preventing St. Paul’s Hospital from taking her young husband off life support.
On Nov. 11, Onkarbir Singh Toor, 34, suffered cardiac arrest at his home and was rushed to the Vancouver hospital.
Two days later, the hospital advised Raspaul Kaur Toor, 24, that three physicians had assessed her husband and concluded he was brain dead, according to court documents filed in the case.
She was told it was contrary to the medical code to continue to provide treatment to a patient who had been declared clinically dead and that if she didn’t get a court injunction by Monday at 4 p.m., the hospital would remove her husband from life support, ending his life.
On Monday, she went to court and was granted an order restraining the hospital and its physicians and staff from discontinuing the health care being provided to Toor.
B.C. Supreme Court Justice Elaine Adair ordered that for the next few days, fluids be administered to Toor as necessary and that regular blood work continue to be done at least once a day for him.
The order is good until Wednesday, when the case is expected to be back in court to hear the merits of the family’s application to keep an injunction in place for at least four weeks to allow Toor a chance to recover.
On Tuesday, a member of the family identifying himself as Dr. Toor said they were going to be busy for the next few days.
“As you can understand, we’re dealing with a very difficult situation.”
The petition in the case said that after Toor suffered the cardiac arrest, his father and brother, both of whom are medical doctors, immediately started administering CPR to him and CPR was continued until he was taken to St. Paul’s by ambulance.
After arriving at the hospital, Toor, whose family said had no prior history of heart problems, was put on life support and after some treatment, his heart and kidney regained normal function, according to the petition.
A CT scan of Toor’s brain indicated normal results but on the day of his admission, he was wrongly given a dose of the drug aripiprazole that is a known central nervous system depressant and is “contraindicated” in comatose patients, stated the petition.
A second CT scan was conducted showing diffuse cerebral edema –  the accumulation of fluid in the brain – and based on that scan doctors at the hospital declared Toor brain dead, said the court document.
But Toor’s family consulted a radiologist at Abbotsford Hospital who reviewed the second scan and while agreeing it showed signs of edema, was unable to identify any “cerebral necrosis,” it said.
At first doctors at the hospital agreed to investigate further but later refused to do so, said the court document.
The family claims that brain swelling usually peaks after five to seven days and then slowly starts coming down and Toor’s coma may have been deepened by the drug aripiprazole and recovery could be possible once the drug is metabolized.
“Given his young age, good health prior to the cardiac arrest, and the extremely short time under which he has been in the respondent’s care, it is reasonable to give him a chance to recover,” said the petition.
In an affidavit filed with the petition, Toor’s wife said that she and her husband were married in India in January 2015 and she was able to move to Canada in May this year.
Toor, who said she and her husband have been trying to have children, added that she’s a trained nurse in India and is currently studying to obtain her certification in Canada.
Without life support, her husband would not be able to breathe and would no longer be able to stay alive, she said.
“As his wife, I’m his substitute decision maker. I know my husband’s wishes and know that he would want treatment to continue.”
Providence Health Care, which runs the hospital, had no immediate comment.
kfraser@postmedia.com
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Julie Ali ·
I agree with this family. If you don't have a background in medicine you would believe everything that you are told. Best to go to the medical notes and review the history.

We did this in the case of my handicapped sister. We found out that doctors at the Grey Nuns Hospital had put "Do Not Resuscitate", "Do not intubate" and "No ICU" on her file due to repeated hospitalizations. They offered the family no reasonable explanation for these orders.

For five years, we contested this order by the hospital. Other hospitals backed this order and it was only an ethicist brought in by AHS who indicated to the doctors that perhaps the unseemly haste to dispose of a severely handicapped woman who could be restored to life was perhaps not the right thing to do--resulted in the doctors budging a bit. The DNR order was not appropriate and was the response of a system to a patient they deemed to be non-compliant. This begs the question, that if this was the case then, why didn't the doctors ask for the establishment of a compliance program rather than making a premature termination decision? I'd say it was cheaper to do the DNR than the work of establishing appropriate supports, services and care for a complex care patient.

The fact of the matter is that doctors and nurse are human beings. They get fed up and make expedient decisions. No one did the work up required to validate the DNR such as investigate; I had to do the work for the system.

It is important for advocates to review the medical files and determine if inappropriate decisions are being made when there are life and death decisions at stake.
You can't come back from dead and in my sister's case, because we fought for her resuscitation, she is now alive and living in a supportive living site in Edmonton, Alberta.
If she did not have advocates with a medical background who understood medicine, she would not be with us today.

In life and death matters, let the family decide.
LikeReply8 minsEdited
Sean Neil ·
Why would anyone want to prolong someone's pain and suffering? Selfish.
Charles Mandeville
If he's truly brain dead, he is neither in pain nor suffering, and if not, they may save his life.
LikeReply3Nov 16, 2016 11:41am
Sean Neil ·
For what? To be a vegetable? When I go I'm making sure no one can prolong my life. It's crazy.
LikeReply1Nov 16, 2016 11:52am
Julie Ali ·
I don't think it is selfish. Death is permanent. Let him have a chance.
LikeReply4 mins
Julie Ali ·
Sean Neil Folks come back from near dead experiences. Let this man have his chance at life.
LikeReply3 mins
Lorean Campbell Siller
Hospitals make mistakes all the time ....
Julie Ali ·
Very true. And it sometimes takes strong advocates to ensure that vulnerable patients aren't prematurely terminated.
LikeReply3 mins
Tracey Godfrey ·
i agree with the family...time to heal...hope he makes a full recovery !! and to the wife...good for you for standing up !!!!!!
UnlikeReply5Nov 16, 2016 9:33am
Judy Kent
I spent 3 weeks in this hospital and will forever remember the horrors I experienced. If you love someone do not go to this hospital!!!
UnlikeReply3Nov 16, 2016 9:23am
Janine Martin
It's so important to have strong advocates for when you're in a medical situation and can't speak for yourself.

I agree with what the family is doing and am disappointed that such measures need to be taken so early when they could be spending the time by his side.

Hoping for flickers of light and hope to ignite in his brain soon.
UnlikeReply10Nov 16, 2016 8:55am
Steve Effox ·
So you basically are saying "thoughts and prayers" to bring him back to life? Never works but go ahead with those thoughts and prayers.
LikeReplyNov 16, 2016 9:10am
Janine Martin
Im saying that I agree with the article.
LikeReply3Nov 16, 2016 9:30am
Julie Ali ·
Steve Effox Sometimes folks do get better. And this man deserves a chance.
LikeReply2 mins
Harminder Pal Singh
Waheguru charhdi kala bakhshan! He will pull through! !
LikeReply1Nov 16, 2016 7:42am
Nelly Bull ·
Sounds kind of shady. Young fit man, family doctors and 'wrongly administered medicine'?
LikeReply5Nov 16, 2016 4:40am
Rose Lawson Steinmeier ·
The hospital administered the wrong medicine, not the family. The family is fighting to give this young man a chance.
LikeReply3Nov 16, 2016 11:18am
Jo Fraser
Hope he has a full recovethy....
Norm Stelnicki ·
I agree with the families petition. Hard to beleive that they were ready to take him off life support so fast .I hope he pulls through and has full recovery.
LikeReply20Nov 16, 2016 12:03am
Lalah Lovato
I agree with you! Catholic hospital that is ready to shut down abortions but ready to kill the living. As a former RN (I was born in St. Paul's and also worked there) I have looked after a young comatose brain injured man and he was basically written off. Luckily he survived when he was finally taken off the respirator and gradually came back - and actually went to college!
UnlikeReply9Nov 16, 2016 8:37amEdited
Julie Ali ·
Lalah Lovato The Grey Nuns Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta is a faith based hospital and doctors there put a DNR (do not resuscitate order) on my handicapped sister for no particular reason that I can determine.
LikeReplyJust now
Goraya Saab ·
I wish the young man a fast recovery . Rab Rakha .
LikeReply4Nov 15, 2016 11:51pm
Malo Ghazan ·
congrats, may Allah give quick recovery to Mr toor ameen
Steve Effox ·
?????????????????? but not children who die by the thousands each day, right?
LikeReplyNov 16, 2016 9:11am
Laurita Rivera ·
Cynthia Ivelise Diaz-Pineiro

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