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Because provinces and territories have primary responsibility for delivery of healthcare, they will need to set out specific guidelines for how exactly doctors administer assisted death (order of injections, specific drugs, etc). The federal law only makes reference to administering “a substance” to cause death. The federal government says it will “work with the provinces and territories to support a consistent approach to medical assistance in dying across Canada.”------ Julie Ali · University of Alberta There is a ton of public discourse on death by doctor legislation. There is less interest in good palliative care or appropriate integrated care plan for complex health conditions. AHS is able to increase staff to help citizens die but we don't see a similar courtesy in terms of helping them live. The death by doctor business will provide insurance companies with fewer bills and certainly relieve the government at all levels of the costs of citizens who decide to die. I believe this legislation makes the lives of disabled citizens more at risk. The legislation is open to challenge and we will have a broadening of scope. If we look at the cases of death by doctor in other countries we have some poor outcomes where we have had autistic people terminated. It's not a good thing. Not only is the death by doctor business not a good thing for handicapped citizens we have the additional problem of the unregulated do not resuscitate order (DNR) that is sometimes placed on the medical files of handicapped citizens for years and cannot be challenged without major effort. Such DNR orders allow the premature termination of handicapped citizens without insight and in my opinion, are an unregulated form of death by doctor. Public discourse is required on the issue of DNR and broadening of the death by doctor legislation to include safeguards for our defenceless handicapped citizens. If these vulnerable citizens without insight are given a DNR decision and they have no advocate what do you think will happen to them? The lack of checks and balances in Alberta is astonishing to me.--




April 14, 2016 8:34 am
Updated: April 14, 2016 4:38 pm

Assisted-dying in Canada: What you need to know about the new law

By National Online Journalist, Politics Global News
WATCH: History was made in Canada today as the Trudeau government laid out its plan to give terminally ill people a way to end their lives with the help of doctors and nurses. As Jacques Bourbeau explains, there's a lot in the legislation and a lot that was left out.
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The federal government unveiled its assisted-dying legislation Thursday, after numerous delays and an extension from the Supreme Court of Canada granted last winter.
Health Minister Jane Philpott and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould were both on hand Thursday morning in Ottawa to provide details. Their announcement comes more than a year after the Supreme Court struck down Canada’s ban on doctor-assisted death.

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Here are some of the major points:

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The proposed law, which must still be debated and passed in the House of Commons, is not as permissive as recommended by a special joint Parliamentary committee that examined the issue of assisted death this past year.
The law will not allow for anyone under the age of 18 to seek or receive help in dying. It will also likely exclude many Canadians suffering solely from mental illnesses, because one of the prerequisites for accessing assisted death is that the person’s natural death is “reasonably foreseeable.” Suicide would not be considered a natural death.

Quebec man starves himself after not qualifying for medically-assisted death

Quebec man starves himself after not qualifying for medically-assisted death
Quebec man starves himself after not qualifying for medically-assisted death
Lawyer says the fight is over after court approves physician-assisted death
Lawyer says the fight is over after court approves physician-assisted death
Manitoba resident granted right to die by doctor assisted death
Manitoba resident granted right to die by doctor assisted death
Alberta doctors prepare for physician assisted death requests
Alberta doctors prepare for physician assisted death requests
Widower wants wife’s name public after medically-assisted death
Widower wants wife’s name public after medically-assisted death
Faith-based hospitals walking ethical lines over assisted death
Faith-based hospitals walking ethical lines over assisted death
The government is proposing, however, to appoint “one or more independent bodies” to study how the law might be extended to mature minors or non-terminal mental health patients down the line. It will also examine the notion of allowing people to express wishes regarding doctor-assisted death in their wills (advanced directives).
The panel had urged the government to put as few obstacles as possible in front of Canadians who want a doctor’s help to end their suffering, and had recommended allowing mature minors and those suffering from mental illnesses to access assisted dying.

‘Advanced state’ of decline

The law states that anyone asking for medical help in dying must have a serious and incurable illness, disease or disability. They must also be in an “advanced state of irreversible decline in capability” and their death must be “reasonably foreseeable.”
These last two requirements could result in court challenges. The Supreme Court’s decision made no mention of being in an advanced state of decline when it struck down the ban on assisted death, stating only that a person should be suffering from a “grievous and irremediable medical condition” in order to qualify. There was also no mention of reasonably foreseeable death.
Ottawa’s law does state, however, that a person can still get help dying even if they are not extremely close to natural death, as they must be under Quebec’s assisted-dying law.

Safeguards

The federal law includes a series of safeguards to ensure that patients are of sound mind and truly qualify for assisted death.
A patient will first need to make a written request to kick-start the process, and that request must be signed by two “independent” witnesses. Neither of those witnesses can be providing medical or other personal care to the patient, own or operate the facility where they are being cared for, or be a beneficiary of the patient’s will.
Two independent doctors or nurse practitioners must then evaluate the request and provide their opinions on whether the patient qualifies.
If a request is approved, there must have been a 15-day span between the signing of the request and death for “reflection.” That may be waived or shortened if death or loss of the capacity to consent is imminent.
Patients can withdraw their request at any point in the process.
WATCH: Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould outlines specific conditions required for those seeking assisted death

Prevention of ‘suicide tourism’

The new law will include a provision that limits access to assisted death to those who are eligible for health services funded by the government of Canada. That means you need a health card.
That will prevent so-called suicide tourism from other jurisdictions like the U.S., according to officials.

Timing and implementation

None of the changes in the Criminal Code or existing federal law will take effect until June 6, 2016, or until the new legislation is passed in Parliament.
People seeking or inquiring about assisted death in individual provinces like Quebec, where a law or guidelines already exists, can continue to do so.
Because provinces and territories have primary responsibility for delivery of healthcare, they will need to set out specific guidelines for how exactly doctors administer assisted death (order of injections, specific drugs, etc). The federal law only makes reference to administering “a substance” to cause death.
The federal government says it will “work with the provinces and territories to support a consistent approach to medical assistance in dying across Canada.”
WATCH: Feds plan to respect provinces ability to decide specifics of assisted-dying laws
© 2016 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Julie Ali · 
There is a ton of public discourse on death by doctor legislation. There is less interest in good palliative care or appropriate integrated care plan for complex health conditions.

AHS is able to increase staff to help citizens die but we don't see a similar courtesy in terms of helping them live.

The death by doctor business will provide insurance companies with fewer bills and certainly relieve the government at all levels of the costs of citizens who decide to die.

I believe this legislation makes the lives of disabled citizens more at risk. The legislation is open to challenge and we will have a broadening of scope. If we look at the cases of death by doctor in other countries we have some poor outcomes where we have had autistic people terminated. It's not a good thing.

Not only is the death by doctor business not a good thing for handicapped citizens we have the additional problem of the unregulated do not resuscitate order (DNR) that is sometimes placed on the medical files of handicapped citizens for years and cannot be challenged without major effort. Such DNR orders allow the premature termination of handicapped citizens without insight and in my opinion, are an unregulated form of death by doctor.

Public discourse is required on the issue of DNR and broadening of the death by doctor legislation to include safeguards for our defenceless handicapped citizens. If these vulnerable citizens without insight are given a DNR decision and they have no advocate what do you think will happen to them? The lack of checks and balances in Alberta is astonishing to me.
LikeReplyJust now
Rhonda Monkman
so where does one apply or how?
Programmer Cybergod Constructor
I wish there was euthanasia for people like me who sincernly want to just leave this world. It's funny how they have abortion but yet they don't have euthanasia for those who want to leave this world. I am so frustrated to the point where I feel like I'm going to lose my mind, if I don't find a way out of this world it's not going to be good.
Nicolas Leblanc
Abortion is murder, not suicide. If you want to kill yourself you don't need anybodies permission
LikeReplyNov 5, 2016 8:43pm
Shawn Gifford ·
well that sucks. i was just about to get assisted suicide but apparantly i can't get it if im extremely depressed by having a liar as a prime minister . i guess ill have to wait another 3 years to see if he get elected again to try again on assisted suicide.
Programmer Cybergod Constructor
Exactly, I was flipping thinking that I would finally be free from all of this. But no these poop heads just want to see us suffer.
LikeReplySep 28, 2016 1:51pm
Linda Barringer · 
Religion should keep out of assisted dying,and politics. Some people believe you should stay alive no matter what. Its awful to watch some one suffering and not having their pain under control and beg for it all to end, and for lots of other reasons . Nobody should have to suffer that in this day and age! But, unfortunatly its common place.
LikeReply1Apr 19, 2016 9:34am
Nicolas Leblanc
Please tell why a religious figure would waste their time stating the fact that suicide is a mortal sin, if not for your own benefit. Do you think they gain ANYTHING from telling unpopular truths?
LikeReplyNov 5, 2016 8:45pm
Nancy Sena Burnett
My husband has suffered with MS for over 30 years since the age of 40 .He has been in a care home for the last 7 years.He can do nothing for himselve .Its hell to watch and hell for him .He has no life ,I can hardly stand watching him. I want peace for him please it's so unfair ,Never ,never would we let our animals suffer like this .
LikeReply3Apr 17, 2016 8:16pm
Meagan Rogers · 
OMG, your words make me so sad and fearful. My fiancé was diagnosed with MS at 26 years old. I hope the medication helps him not have to go through this. I agree, I would not let my dog suffer like that. Who are these people to think they have the right to tell him that he has less rights than a pet.
LikeReplyJul 4, 2016 5:55pm
Nicolas Leblanc
So you think of your husband as an animal?
LikeReplyNov 5, 2016 8:42pm
BT Coop
Not even close to being broad enough. FFS, think about all those with dementia, Alzheimer's, ALS, locked-in syndrome, etc. Think of all those that suffered for month, even years, with these horrible diseases in nursing homes. Forcing those people to stay alive against their wishes is cruel.

A legal-document, completed while still of sound mind, SHOULD be available to every Canadian. (Ideally completed at 18 years old.) This document - both digital and hard-copy - would be filed with our GP, local hospital, and close family members. Perhaps a lawyer should also have a copy. The contents of the document, which should be updated frequently (annually?) or as health condition is diagnosed and later deteriorates, MUST be followed exactly as laid out.

Bottom line is:

I WON'T interfere with YOUR decision and YOU WON'T interfere with MINE!
LikeReply1Apr 17, 2016 8:03pmEdited
Warren Garcia · 
That's it Canada - embrace the Death Culture. See you in Hell, Liberals,
Jennifer Mawhinney
You enjoy torturing dying people? Hypocrite.
LikeReply9Apr 15, 2016 3:14pm
Tracy Johnston Knittle · 
It is about time this process has finally started.....it can be re-evaluated to include a broader scope down the line.....as least it is a beginning
LikeReply3Apr 14, 2016 11:40am
William Bill Couch · 
To Gavin May: Would this apply to depressed young Aboriginals?
LikeReply1Apr 14, 2016 11:36am
Ruben Jessie Aldana · 
It would apply anyone and everyone including aboriginals
LikeReplyApr 14, 2016 12:31pm
Michelle Flint
Ruben Jessie Aldana, That is horrible because depression comes and goes.
LikeReply2Apr 14, 2016 1:58pm
Gavin May
People with major depressive disorder or any other mental illness need to be included too! It's a condition where people suffer like anyone else with a disease, unable to work or have any quality of life. Instead of having family find them after a suicide, allow them to die with dignity in a safe and controlled environment.
LikeReply6Apr 14, 2016 10:18am
Jim Bathie · 
Good call. People that are guaranteed to die and suffer through enormous pain and discomfort should all be compared to people who are sad.

It's probably too bad there aren't meds to combat depression and other mental disorders. At least then those people could live out their lives..........for decades in most cases. All the 'authorized' group can do is take pain medication until they die..........in months.
LikeReply4Apr 18, 2016 12:21pmEdited
Jeanette Curtis · 
Jim Bathie While I agree that it should not apply to people with depression ect (and I am one), saying that they are "people who are sad" is insulting and uninformed. It's so much more than that, and it does reflect physically. That being said, it is not incurable, and it is treatable, and there are many avenues for treatment, so depression ect should NOT be included.
UnlikeReply6Apr 14, 2016 12:31pm
Ruben Jessie Aldana · 
Definitely agree. People who suffer from
Mental illnesses should be included
LikeReply2Apr 14, 2016 12:32pm
Vanda Pietrantonio
Mental illness is a disease of the brain. How can a person who is not thinking clearly make a decision to take his own life? Once a person with mental illness is on medication he or she does not feel that suicide is the answer. Having worked in psychiatry I can not see too many psychiatrists that would allow patients with mental illness to be euthanized or killed whatever word you like to use.
LikeReplyApr 15, 2016 10:52am
Jim Bathie · 
Jeanette Curtis I suffer from depression as well Jeanette. So it's not insulting or uniformed. You and I are 'sad' about something, someone or somewhere, any or all of the aforemented.

Sorry that you didn't know that, or sorry you were insulted because you're uninformed. Try to keep up.
LikeReplyApr 18, 2016 12:20pm
Jim Bathie · 
Vanda Pietrantonio Well said Vanda. I see this legislation quite clearly. It's legalized murder, or legalized suicide. No matter what label is used, somebody has to pull the trigger (metaphor for load the needle with poison) or push the button.

And I'm not saying I disagree with this being an option for those that have been suffering for days, weeks, months or years.
LikeReplyApr 18, 2016 12:25pm
Programmer Cybergod Constructor
Jeanette Curtis Because of people like you I suffer.
LikeReplySep 28, 2016 1:54pm
Julie Ali · 
Vanda Pietrantonio Actually in my handicapped sister's case the doctors put a DNR on her file despite her personal directive requirement for full resuscitation. It was a mind boggling situation that had no safeguards in place to protect her. She lacked insight and yet the doctors were willing to let her die.
It is pretty clear to me at least that there needs to be legislation for DNR orders and oversight with appeals when any such order is placed on a defenceless handicapped citizen.
It is appalling and no one in Alberta Health has any interest in making such legislation but refer people to downstream entities that can't do anything to help citizens.
LikeReply21 mins
Julie Ali · 
I don't believe that citizens with mental illness need to be offered more opportunities for suicide.
Appropriate services, supports and medication can provide relief and even intractable mental illness does not mean we should offer death by doctor to these cases.
Citizens with mental illness are vulnerable enough and die prematurely without this additional opportunity to die.
LikeReply8 mins
Janet McKay · 
The news reporter providentially said it correctly...medical assisted suicide...
LikeReply3Apr 14, 2016 10:10am
Jim Bathie · 
Yes, medical assisted suicide. Or de-criminalizing the taking of a life. Same thing.
LikeReply4Apr 14, 2016 12:24pm
Vanda Pietrantonio
Jim Bathie It is taking a life otherwise why would the law have to be changed. I really find this law disturbing. The fact that euthanization is considered heath care is a contradiction. As a former nurse for close to 40 years I can not agree with euthanization or killing anyone. Once this starts more and more indications will be included; I don't think many people who agree with the law actually thought it through.
LikeReply2Apr 15, 2016 10:59am
Jim Bathie · 
Vanda Pietrantonio They didn't Vanda. This is a slippery slope and opens the door for all sorts of shenanigans.

One part that really bothered me was discussed about a month ago, wherein a doctor would be mandated to refer you to someone who would assist you in killing yourself.

So, our medical system would pay a GP to write a referral, costing the Province $(don't know what a GP gets for a visit) dollars, bill the Province for the referral and then the suicide doctor would also get paid.

It's a waste of resources. Google who is willing and book an appointment.
LikeReply1Apr 18, 2016 12:30pm
Julie Ali · 
Jim Bathie This is indeed a slippery slope but not as slippery as the DNR route where a doctor can put this order on a handicapped citizen's file; get other doctors to agree and end the life of a patient without insight.
Family can protest but you are up against the system. It's troubling and Alberta Health isn't interested in this problem.
LikeReply19 mins
Julie Ali · 
Vanda Pietrantonio I believe this legislation was designed to contain costs for the system and for decreasing the insurance companies' costs. Some citizens may be so tired of the struggle in the health care and continuing care system that they would prefer to die in this way but if we had decent supports and services for our most vulnerable citizens there would be less of a demand for death by doctor.

It is also contradictory, in my opinion, that the doctor who is keeping you alive would also be willing to help you die.Once citizens accept this legislation there will be a push for challenges to include other categories of illness, including the mentally ill and children. No doubt this will be a boon to the government which has no plan in place for either seniors or the mentally ill but I do not believe this legislation is in the best interests of our most vulnerable handicapped citizens. They are already at risk with the use of inappropriate DNR orders kept on their files for years and now they have to contend with the possibility of accessing this death by doctor legislation at any time in the future when the law is changed. It is a sad business but there you go. There is money for increasing the number of staff by AHS to provide death by doctor but no similar response to the fentanyl deaths until the deaths reach a record 343 deaths. We can see the priority is not in keeping folks alive but in helping them to die and thereby decreasing costs for the system:

http://www.cbc.ca/.../fentanyl-opiod-crisis-deaths...
On Tuesday, Alberta's opposition parties chided the government for not doing enough on the issue

Wildrose MLA Tany Yao again called on the NDP government to declare a public health emergency, which he said would allow for greater information sharing and bring more public awareness to the fentanyl crisis.

Alberta Liberal Leader, Dr. David Swann, said the government's response to the opioid crisis falls short of what is needed.​

"The NDP government has not put enough priority or urgency on this issue," Swann said in a statement. "In addition to naloxone, it must ensure greater co-operation, more information sharing, and a better understanding of what is and what is not working."
LikeReply10 mins

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