Sunday, September 24, 2017

reading day

A wonderful day. It was wonderful simply because I did my groceries very slowly and then I had a major nap.
No matter how lazy this is construed a major nap is simply so wonderful. I did not repot the geraniums which are by now very sulky in their pots. Some of them have been sitting in water and are rusty looking. I will may be lively enough --to be able to do them tomorrow.
I could have gone to Rebecca today but as I was tuckered out and she slept most of the time I was at the Villa yesterday I thought I might as well sleep at home today. At least all her clothes and art supplies were organized yesterday.
Then I did not exercise. It's a bad thing but I read a little after my nap and was able to digest some of what I read which is a good thing.
Usually I read until my brain fries and can't take in any more information. My boys don't read although I have force fed them books since babyhood. All that reading to the boys has resulted in me continuing to read like a train racing through town without stopping.
The books I got in the Riverbend Library a few days ago were all on brain function. I am trying to increase my brain function. Apparently in the prehistory of man we were all exercising day and night trying not to become prey. Now we aren't prey for the most part, our lazy lives result in brain problems. Increasing brain function by exercising seems to be an easy way to do the work of ramping up thinking quality but I have to do it of course.
Once in the recent past I used to walk three hours a day which lead to problems in care taking of extended family. Then I used to be fit and smart. Now I barely shuffle into the street to limp down a neighbourhood road for a small saunter to inspect dying marsh reeds. It's time to change my habit of lounging around in the house.
The bad habit of looking at the news is also bad for my brain I believe. The dumb things that the world leaders do and then to read the analysis of the dumb things they do is enough to cause brain atrophy altogether. Far better to ignore the world leaders as there isn't much we can do if they decide to weaponize the world.
In any case, the more important matters might be to learn how to make our own brains work. Right now I am trying to get through a pile of books every week. It's hard to do this as I am distracted by every new book I get so I'm shoveling down words from one book to only be seduced by a new book and so on and so forth until my head explodes. Then I usually go make a fried egg sandwhich or cheese toast to get myself back on the carousel of reading.
Well I'd better get back to the books. Decoding a book is a challenge when the mind of the writer is not entirely visible to me.
Remedios Varo
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---#TaxLoopholesMyFoot-----------Julie Ali Just now · The Calgary Herald · It's kind of rich that the Kenney is smearing the NDP folks in government-- in this section of the article: http://calgaryherald.com/…/ndp-are-keeping-low-key-on-feder… The Notley government’s relative quiet on the tax issue has prompted criticism from candidates running for the leadership of the United Conservative Party Opposition, with former federal cabinet minister Jason Kenney characterizing the NDP as a “lapdog” for Trudeau. ** I seem to remember that Mr. Kenney was a major representative for the Harper guy and his anti-democratic style of governance. So short a memory indicates to me at least that we should hire Mr. Jean for the power premier job.

#TaxLoopholesMyFoot--all political parties will find any way to get more revenue when they need it. Government doesn't bother about tax fairness for the richest folks--the CEOs who have a stock loophole that protects their earnings--but they go after the small business owners. Y'all say that there are no impacts on us? Well I'm guessing this is just the beginning. We have increased costs and we have decreased business plus tax changes. All of this stresses our businesses.
I'm of the opinion that if the federal government is going to bring up fairness it needs to show us this fairness by eliminating the stock loophole and then coming to us to discuss changes.
Imposing changes like this is unfair. #FairnessMyFoot
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It's kind of rich that the Kenney is smearing the NDP folks in government-- in this section of the article:
The Notley government’s relative quiet on the tax issue has prompted criticism from candidates running for the leadership of the United Conservative Party Opposition, with former federal cabinet minister Jason Kenney characterizing the NDP as a “lapdog” for Trudeau.
**
I seem to remember that Mr. Kenney was a major representative for the Harper guy and his anti-democratic style of governance. So short a memory indicates to me at least that we should hire Mr. Jean for the power premier job.
Harper’s single white males
Paul Wells takes an inside look at where the power really lies in Ottawa
Paul Wells
September 12, 2011
The oldest of the ministerial trio is just 43, and Jason Kenney is also the likeliest to charge into a fight like a bull. The minister of citizenship and immigration has already picked a fight this year with Amnesty International over his plan to enlist the public’s help in identifying and rounding up fugitives suspected of hiding in Canada from their alleged past behaviour as war criminals. He fancies himself the guardian of small-c conservative orthodoxy in the Harper government, and the autonomy he enjoys within Harper’s government has no match.

Alberta’s NDP government is taking a muted approach to proposed federal tax changes that have prompted some other provinces to take aim at the Trudeau government.Manitoba Premier Brian Pallis…
CALGARYHERALD.COM

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http://calgaryherald.com/news/politics/ndp-are-keeping-low-key-on-federal-tax-changes

NDP are keeping low-key on federal tax changes

Published on: September 22, 2017 | Last Updated: September 22, 2017 5:11 PM MDT
Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci presented the Q1 fiscal update for 2017-18 at the Alberta Legislature on Wednesday August 23, 2017. (PHOTO BY LARRY WONG/POSTMEDIA) Larry Wong, POSTMEDIA NETWORK LARRY WONG / POSTMEDIA NETWORK
Alberta’s NDP government is taking a muted approach to proposed federal tax changes that have prompted some other provinces to take aim at the Trudeau government.
Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister is the latest addition to a chorus of complaints from a variety of sectors about proposed reforms designed to eliminate several tax incentives for private corporations.
Pallister’s intervention came as the Canadian Federation of Independent Business lobby group called Friday for all provincial premiers to join a campaign against the tax proposals.
Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci was not made available for an interview, however.
In a statement put out by the government in response to the CFIB release, Ceci said he encouraged all Albertans, including entrepreneurs, to give their feedback to federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau.
“Our government stands with small business as our economic recovery continues to strengthen. Alberta is recovering from the worst recession in a generation,” he said.
“The federal government, and all governments, need to be thoughtful and prudent on any tax changes to ensure it does not dampen the recovery.”
Morneau and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau have argued that the tax system unfairly encourages wealthy Canadians to incorporate, so they can get a better tax rate than middle-income earners.
They say the changes are meant to end tax advantages that some wealthy business owners have unfairly exploited and to ensure all Canadians have a level playing field.
But the moves have angered some small-business owners, doctors and farmers, who argue that the tax incentives targeted by the Liberals are critical for the Canadian economy. They insist the current tax structure is necessary for entrepreneurs, including those in the so-called middle class, who take personal financial risks when they decide to open a company.
Other provinces also raised concerns about the tax reforms Friday, with Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil saying it could hurt his province, while British Columbia’s finance minister, Carole James, said Ottawa hadn’t consulted enough.
The Notley government’s relative quiet on the tax issue has prompted criticism from candidates running for the leadership of the United Conservative Party Opposition, with former federal cabinet minister Jason Kenney characterizing the NDP as a “lapdog” for Trudeau.
With files from The Canadian Press

jwood@postmedia.com

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Ken Clawson · 
NDP cant comment on federal government raising taxes, due to the raising of their own taxes. All taxes are pointed at the working class.
UnlikeReply12 hrs
Trent Jeffries
Canadians should be prepared to see a increase in unemployment numbers in the next year. But, not to worry. The NDP will create 100,000 government jobs doing nothing more than paper shuffle
LikeReply622 hrs
Dave Fryett
The NDP has failed to stick up for Alberta in any significant way since they got elected. Trudeau’s many regulatory and tax moves against the energy have been met with either significant applause and piling on with more taxes of their own or like this one, strange silence. When Lougheed was in power, he fought the federal government led by Trudeau Senior any time they tried to encroach on Alberta's jurisdiction or harm Alberta interest. That is why the Alberta economy thrived. In stark contrast, the silence has been deafening under the Alberta NDP. Rachel has all kinds of time to tweet about the latest whipped up fad on social media but no time to craft reasoned polices and responses to protect Alberta interests. Not really a surprise, like Trudeau and Nenshi, Notley has no background or understanding of business and in fact goes out of her way to antagonize business. Latest case in point was her whining about 100 oilsands bird deaths yet ignoring millions killed by wind farms.
LikeReply13Sep 23, 2017 7:29am
J.E. Molnar
The NDP is smart to stay silent. It's a federal matter.

I'm sad though that my wealthy doctor, dentist and lawyer are going to have to do less with the $$$thousands they've been pocketing through Harper tax loopholes.
LikeReply2Sep 22, 2017 10:00pm
Jason Drews · 
This tax increase affects many people who incorporate for work as consultants, the majority of whom are middle class, and many would gladly take an employee job if it were available. They have no gurantee of 40 hours a week, have to re-apply for their job semi-annually, pay for their own training, own conferences, do not get RRSP room on dividends, don't qualify for EI, pay their own benefits, have no paid sick/stat days, no stock options, and are accountable for delivery when they sub contract their work. Saving "Rainy day" money in a company to ensure that you can keep an employee or two (or one day retire) is now in jeopordy due to these changes. These tax changes encourage corporate owners to pull out as much money as possible to avoid punative taxation. The income splitting changes imply "the government does not encourage stay at home spouses to care for children - go back to work." This is not what is best for small business, job security, or the future population of Canada
UnlikeReply14Sep 22, 2017 10:52pmEdited
John Korpan · 
Jason Drews We have become the working people...the people that "believe" and try to get ahead. Every time you try and get ahead you get f**ked, From what I am reading the government wants to make it worse...a contractor that makes 60 thousand is going to get shafted...I hope she/he works and doesn't have kids 'cause the govenment wants to suck you dry (literally). Two working people maybe making a sixty thousand between the two are just going to hammered. Even if the working couple made a 100 grand the government wants 30% of it off the top...so you got 70 thousand...oops...pay for the house...pay for the car...pay for groceries...heaven help you if you have children But we have to pay for the politicians. The excuse is we need more bureaucrats so that the government is "more" efficient..."government loves buraucrats...it's called money under the table" In the gangster world it was called graft. I don't mind paying taxes ...I am just tired of the waste and corruption.
UnlikeReply9Sep 22, 2017 11:22pm
Joseph Walchuk
I believe the current small business / private corporation tax structure originated under Trudeau Senior.
LikeReplySep 23, 2017 6:06am
JoAnne Handcock
The wealthy will still have their loopholes. It is the middle class small business, the drivers of the economy, that are getting screwed. I think Ceci and friends just haven't figured it out yet.
UnlikeReply7Sep 23, 2017 6:30am
Dave Fryett
If you cared about facts you would understand the incorporation only allowed for tax deferral. Small business owners could build up a little nest egg to fund their retirement, maternity leave, sick pay, all benefits government workers get for free. When the money was paid out from the corporation at a later date the tax was paid then. Good business practice to keep some amount of working capital in a business to carry it through recessions as well. This is a case of greedy governments being impatient raiding everything they can to pay for their excessive spending. Funny thing thought, the Trudeau Testamentary Trust that Justin has greatly benefited from all his life, that isn't being touched by his reforms. He is only going after small business owners as they tend to be more conservative in nature vote conservative more. Just trying to wipe out all his enemies as he tries to make Canada a one party state like China or Cuba, Justin Trudeau is the most evil prime minister ever.
LikeReply9Sep 23, 2017 7:35am
J.E. Molnar
Dave Fryett you spend way to much time bloviating and riling against the left to have any credibility. You're a fact-challenged yokel.
LikeReplySep 23, 2017 8:18am
Chris Manchester
J.E. Molnar credibility? You don't even use your own name. Why does anyone engage in a discussion with someone who hides behind a fake name?
UnlikeReply11Sep 23, 2017 8:22am
Gordon Bullivant · 
And I don't have my promised light bulbs that were promised in April! I will give you some Mr. Molnar to shed some light on you. Might be a long wait though!
UnlikeReply523 hrs
Chris Manchester
Gordon Bullivant, you can't give J.E. Molnar anything. Because no one knows his/her name!!! But it's extremely kind of you to offer the raging coward something!!!! Lol
LikeReply121 hrsEdited
Dave Fryett
J.E. Molnar Typical left wing progressive playbook, when a few inconvenient facts challenge your crafted spin and show your position to be devoid of reality, quickly resort to name calling as no facts back up your case.
LikeReply12 hrs
J.E. Molnar
Dave Fryett when you can articulate legitimate facts and not cut-and-paste CPC dogma get back to me. When hillbillies like you try to ingratiate yourself into other people's posts, without factual knowledge, you lack credibility. Try your conservative dogma on the less knowledgable. You're wasting your time here.

The fact is 80% of the money goes to less than 2% of the people affected. Doctors now pay less tax (percentage) than nurses. To all the CPC sycophants, 73% of small businesses are not affected by this. The CPC is trying to squash a fly with sledge hammer -- typical conservative playbook dogma. I call it Scheer lunacy.
LikeReply25 mins
Julie Ali · 
J.E. Molnar If Trudeau wants "fairness" for all then I suggest he begin with the stock loophole for the richest CEOs in BIG business. Instead Trudeau is citing "fairness" only for small business owners. I'd suggest that you consider fairness in terms of all loopholes. Perhaps small business owners would believe this rot if they had proof that other loopholes that result in major revenue losses such as the stock loophole --were being trimmed. But not so.

No matter who these changes impact, all small business owners -in my opinion will have increased costs for doing business. When we're already having decreased revenues in Alberta due to the ongoing bust that promises to be long term, this is just another stress on the middle class small business owners.

Work is increasingly being contractual in nature. More so called safe public sector jobs will be privatized and more citizens will have to incorporate to survive. This issue has nothing to do with the brand of politics.
LikeReply6 mins
Gail Hopps · 
If the federal government brings in their proposed tax changes, led by Justin Trudeau and Finance Minister Bill Morneau, incorporated small businesses across Canada will be forced to close their holdings companies and opt instead for other retirement savings strategies like the private pension plans offered by Morneau Shepell. http://pensionassess.morneaushepell.com/en

What they neglect to mention is that the Morneaus family business is set to make billions by forcing people to invest into
their pension plans. By closing the corporate "Loophole" it will eliminate their own self directed retirement nest egg. This is a definite conflict of interest

Morneau is also listed in the Panama Papers for his off shore accounts and his company handles private pensions that will have a huge windfall if these reforms pass. This is all verifiable if you look up his companies websit as it's a public company so info is there.

Not impressed by 1%ers benefiting 1%ers
UnlikeReply9Sep 22, 2017 9:56pm
Doris Johnson
Personally I believe that Notley and Ceci are secretly jumping with glee over Justin's tax grab. When he does this, Notley's increased tax rates will automatically kick in and take more from these businesses, farmers and doctors.. And Notley feels she can just rake it in and not get blamed.
If Notley and Ceci were genuinely on the side of these folks they would be fighting Trudeau like other premiers.
LikeReply8Sep 22, 2017 9:18pm
Tim Cameron · 
I agree Doris. Ceci states he stands with us. He should have said stands behind us. Any politician who has small business and those employed by small business in mind would stand in front of their constituents like a few credible provincial politicians are doing. Increased taxation to small business combined with increased costs of operations means fewer entry level jobs.
Reply1Sep 23, 2017 9:37am
Penny Russell Leman
Our NDP government hasn't met a tax they didn't like yet. Pretty sure you won't hear a peep out of them.
LikeReply9Sep 22, 2017 9:17pm
Russell Drummond · 
“The federal government, and all governments, need to be thoughtful and prudent on any tax changes to ensure it does not dampen the recovery.”
You mean like the carbon tax, and increased corporate taxes, and increased tax rates on higher income workers Joe?
UnlikeReply16Sep 22, 2017 4:11pm
Louise Bonneau
Notley is in the back pocket of Sock Puppet, she will not do anything to displease her master.
But she sure add her own taxes to drain her voters.
LikeReply13Sep 22, 2017 3:03pm
Julie Ali · 
Government is faced with decreased revenues. This is the reason for the current moves both on the Carbon tax which is basically a greenwashing GST and the small business tax changes. Government does not have money; it has to get money from us.

This is true whether we have conservatives or liberals in power. I don't think Ms. Notley is responsible for the failures of the Alberta PCs to ensure we had reasonable reserves and prudent management of the money in the boom years.

She is doing the best she can even though the ways this is being done aren't very good. I mean what is the point of a Carbon tax that simply returns most of the revenue to citizens? It's just a spin show in my opinion. And shutting down the power plants that use coal doesn't provide us with an explanation of where the backup power is going to come when we have an increase in need does it?

Also calling Trudeau and Notley names isn't polite. All political parties are the same. Just different taxing ploys.
LikeReplyJust now
Bill Wylie · 
“The federal government, and all governments, need to be thoughtful and prudent on any tax changes to ensure it does not dampen the recovery.”
Ceci is a hypocrite since all the NDP has done is implement new taxes which has dampened the Alberta economy. The NDP have raised personal taxes, corporate taxes, carbon taxes, even the large emitters carbon tax and closing coal power plants and subsidizing unreliable renewable energy will result in higher electricity prices and a larger debt that the tax payers will have to pay for.
LikeReply21Sep 22, 2017 2:21pm