Thursday, December 31, 2015

--the virtues of the heart----Janine Shepherd: A broken body isn't a broken person TEDxKC · 18:57 · Filmed Oct 2012

https://www.ted.com/talks/janine_shepherd_a_broken_body_isn_t_a_broken_person

Janine Shepherd:
A broken body isn't a broken person

TEDxKC · 18:57 · Filmed Oct 2012


Cross-country skier Janine Shepherd hoped for an Olympic medal — until she was hit by a truck during a training bike ride. She shares a powerful story about the human potential for recovery. Her message: you are not your body, and giving up old dreams can allow new ones to soar.

do the thing----------Filmed November 2010 at TEDxMidAtlantic Diana Laufenberg: How to learn? From mistakes

https://www.ted.com/talks/diana_laufenberg_3_ways_to_teach

Filmed November 2010 at TEDxMidAtlantic

Diana Laufenberg: How to learn? From mistakes

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Diana Laufenberg shares three surprising things she has learned about teaching — including a key insight about learning from mistakes.
Educator
For over 15 years Diana has been a secondary social studies teacher in Wisconsin, Kansas, Arizona and Pennsylvania. Full bio

Filmed March 2011 at TED2011 Daniel Tammet: Different ways of knowing





https://www.ted.com/talks/daniel_tammet_different_ways_of_knowing

Filmed March 2011 at TED2011

Daniel Tammet: Different ways of knowing


Daniel Tammet has linguistic, numerical and visual synesthesia — meaning that his perception of words, numbers and colors are woven together into a new way of perceiving and understanding the world. The author of "Born on a Blue Day," Tammet shares his art and his passion for languages in this glimpse into his beautiful mind.
Linguist, educator
Daniel Tammet is the author of "Born on a Blue Day," about his life with high-functioning autistic savant syndrome. He runs the language-learning site Optimnem, and his new book is "Embracing the Wide Sky: A Tour Across the Horizons of the Mind." Full bio

Filmed March 2014 at TED2014 Wendy Chung: Autism — what we know (and what we don’t know yet)



https://www.simonsfoundation.org/funding/funding-opportunities/autism-research-initiative-sfari/





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2016 Pilot and Research Award RFA

RFA Closed

We seek applications from independent investigators who will conduct bold, imaginative, and rigorous research to improve the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorders.  Applications can include, but are not limited to, studies at the genetic, molecular, cellular, circuit and behavioral levels, in addition to clinical and translational studies. Two types of applications are available: the SFARI Pilot Award and the SFARI Research Award.

explorer-award

SFARI Explorer Award

› RFA Open / Rolling

A deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying autism spectrum disorders or potential therapeutic approaches will require investigation at multiple levels, including but not limited to studies focused on gene discovery, molecular mechanisms, circuits, anatomy, and cognition and behavior. We will consider proposals at all of these levels.

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Bridge to Independence Award Request for Applications

RFA Closed

Grants awarded through the Bridge to Independence Award program are intended to invest in the next generation of top autism investigators by identifying talented early-career scientists interested in autism research and facilitating their transition to an independent research career. This request for applications (RFA) is aimed at senior postdoctoral fellows who intend to seek tenure-track faculty positions during the 2015-16 academic year.  Successful applicants will receive a commitment of $150,000 per year for three years, to be used for an autism-relevant project, activated upon assumption of a tenure-track professorship.

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Clinical Site Network for the National Autism Cohort Request for Applications

RFA Closed

Grants awarded through this request for applications (RFA) are intended to support a network of U.S.-based clinical sites to recruit individuals and families affected by autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to participate in a national autism cohort. The overall goals of the national autism cohort initiative are to recruit, engage and retain a community of 50,000 individuals with ASD, along with their family members in the United States. Selected clinical sites will receive funding of up to $150,000 per year for a maximum of three years.

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2015 Novel Outcome Measures for ASD Clinical Trials

RFA Closed

Grants awarded through this request for applications (RFA) are intended to develop and validate objective outcome measures for use in clinical trials targeting core symptoms (social communication impairments and restricted, repetitive behaviors) of autism spectrum disorder, and disruptive behavioral symptoms commonly reported in individuals with autism (e.g., anxiety, tantrums).

cajal_snip

Innate Immune System RFA

RFA Closed

Grants awarded through this Request for Applications (RFA) are intended to advance our understanding of the impact of activation of the innate immune system on behavioral, circuit, synaptic and neuronal functions in order to understand the consequences of infection and immune activation on autism-related behaviors.

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Whole-Genome Analysis for Autism Risk Variants Request for Applications

RFA Closed

Grants awarded through this request for applications (RFA) are intended to advance our understanding of the genetic basis of autism, and in particular, to begin to assess genetic variants conferring risk in non-coding regions and in coding regions of the genome that may be less accessible to whole-exome sequencing.  Investigators who are interested in developing innovative and efficient ways to analyze whole-genome sequencing data from 500 Simons Simplex Collection (SSC) families are encouraged to apply.  The maximum budget is $250,000, including indirect costs, for eighteen months, non-renewable.

https://www.simonsfoundation.org/funding/institutions-and-investigators/simons-simplex-collection-site/




Simons Simplex Collection Site

The SFARI Simplex Collection (SSC) is a core project and resource of the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI). The primary goal of the SSC is to establish a permanent repository of genetic samples from approximately 3,000 families, each of which has one child affected with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and parents unaffected with ASD.Each genetic sample will have an associated collection of data that provides a precise characterization of the individual (phenotype). Rigorous phenotyping will maximize the value of the resource for a wide variety of future research projects into the causes and mechanisms of autism.
The SFARI Simplex Collection is operated by SFARI in collaboration with twelve university-affiliated research clinics. The clinics identify and assess potential SSC subjects, with guidance from the University of Michigan Autism & Communication Disorders Center (UMACC), to ensure uniformity across clinics.
Previous pioneering efforts to collect genetic samples focused on families with multiple individuals affected with ASD, most notably the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE), which is an ongoing effort to identify such multiplex families. The SSC differs from those efforts in its focus on simplex families, and in its clinic-based assessment and diagnosis.
  • The collection period to identify approximately 3,000 families will end in early 2011.
  • The current collaborating institutions are listed on SSC Sites.
  • Blood samples are processed into cell lines and DNA at the Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository(RUCDR). Stored samples are freely available to SFARI grant holders, and to other researchers on a modest fee-for-use basis.
  • Data is collected and managed using software developed by Prometheus Research, LLC. A central database characterizing all of the study subjects (with identifying information removed) is available to any qualified researcher through a web interface calledSFARI Base.
  • Participants in the SSC project communicate and manage the project using online collaboration software called Basecamp.

https://www.ted.com/speakers/wendy_chung

At the Simons Foundation, Wendy Chung is working to characterize behavior, brain structure and function in people with genetic variations that may relate to autism.

Why you should listen

Wendy Chung is the director of clinical research at the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, which does both basic and applied science to serve people affected by autism spectrum disorders. She's the principal investigator of the foundation's Simons Variation in Individuals Project, which characterizes behavior and brain structure and function in participants with genetic copy number variants such as those at 16p11.2, which are believed to play a role in spectrum disorders.

Chung also directs the clinical genetics program at Columbia University. In assessing and treating kids with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disabilities, she uses advanced genomic diagnostics to explore the genetic basis of neurological conditions. She thinks deeply about the ethical and emotional questions around genetic medicine and genetic testing.

What others say

“She has a humanistic philosophy that animates everything she does. ... She's not only thinking on all cylinders, but also feeling on all cylinders.” — Hamilton Cain, parent of a patient, author of "This Boy’s Faith"

Wendy Chung’s TED talk



https://www.ted.com/talks/wendy_chung_autism_what_we_know_and_what_we_don_t_know_yet

Filmed March 2014 at TED2014

Wendy Chung: Autism — what we know (and what we don’t know yet)



In this factual talk, geneticist Wendy Chung shares what we know about autism spectrum disorder — for example, that autism has multiple, perhaps interlocking, causes. Looking beyond the worry and concern that can surround a diagnosis, Chung and her team look at what we’ve learned through studies, treatments and careful listening.

Geneticist
At the Simons Foundation, Wendy Chung is working to characterize behavior, brain structure and function in people with genetic variations that may relate to autism. Full bio


https://www.ted.com/talks/temple_grandin_the_world_needs_all_kinds_of_minds


Filmed February 2010 at TED2010

Temple Grandin: The world needs all kinds of minds


Temple Grandin, diagnosed with autism as a child, talks about how her mind works — sharing her ability to "think in pictures," which helps her solve problems that neurotypical brains might miss. She makes the case that the world needs people on the autism spectrum: visual thinkers, pattern thinkers, verbal thinkers, and all kinds of smart geeky kids.
Livestock handling designer, autism activist
Through groundbreaking research and the lens of her own autism, Temple Grandin brings startling insight into two worlds. Full bio