Monday, November 30, 2015

This and That--Monday November 30, 2015

Another busy day.  Once you get through all the work that is lying about you have to do other things like take younger boy to the library and watch him sleep over the physics 30 business. I just got back from the library where he was itching to come home. Now he is home. I have got him into bed since he will have to go to early swim tomorrow. He missed swimming today.

It's just so busy with the boy and his teeth. I have dental appointments for him for the next three weeks. I am beginning to feel like a tooth fairy.

I got only one thing done today but it was useful to have got that one thing done. The "Alberta Mothers Against Fracking" blog is to be set up soon and the working group will strive to make this blog a very user friendly site. The long term care blog is still being worked on but since I am working on the Elder Advocates Working Group there is no time to spare to get it into shape.

The pile of laundry in the mud room is slowly getting down to zero. I had supper already made today which helped.  Tomorrow I will make a roast chicken. I have rice cooked from today and there is a salad that I put together already so we will have a decent meal tomorrow even if I am booked solid for the rest of this week. I can't imagine why anyone would think that a stay at home mum has all the time in the world; I am never home now to blog.


Since I have left the home as a house mouse it is all about activism. I can't dally even with my own mummy who is waiting for me to take her out and about.  I will start the program for walking with her soon or she will become a fossil yet again.

I spent a bit of time at the library going through the newspapers. There were so many there that my head was spinning with the information. The excess of information is both enormous fun and yet a tremendous challenge as one's attention is split so many different ways. I picked up my books that I had requested and I got to skim through other books while I was library sitting younger boy. There was  a neat section of one book on "translational leaders".  I did not read the whole book but this one section was interesting and I note that there may be value in reading the whole book the next time I am at the library. I did not bring it home because I already have a new  bag of books to plough through.

I got a feel for what a translational leader is --it is someone who can quilt a patchwork of people into a product that can be used by all.
It's a great idea for us to think of as we develop our working groups in fracking and in elder advocacy.

Translational leaders for our working groups would work with government and all other groups to ensure that the ongoing disruption of the societal institutions and culture will be experienced by all so that all of us will contribute to the changes that are required. Why do we all need to be invested in the disruption of the society? If we don't all take part and feel we are contributing disruption is ineffective and damaging. We all have to participate and our input has to be valued. If not --we will have a failed disruption and no changes possible.

I like this concept of complete inclusion and knitting together of diverse groups as well as government. Now if only government-that great big mammoth on the verge of extinction learned to adopt such innovative leadership ideas for the good of all citizens rather that elite that controls power at every level of our society.


http://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/2012/11/resilience_how_we_can_learn_to.html


“If we cannot control the volatile tides of change, we can at least learn to build better boats,” write Andrew Zolli and Ann Marie Healy in Resilience. “We can design—and redesign—organizations, institutions, and systems to better absorb disruption, operate under a wider variety of conditions, and shift more fluidly from one circumstance to the next.” 
TRANSLATIONAL LEADERS 

Interestingly—but not surprising—they found that resilient communities had a special type of leader: a translational leader. “These leaders demonstrated an uncanny ability to knit together different constituencies and institutions—brokering relationships and transactions across different levels of political, economic, and social organization.” They were leading from the middle out.
Translational leaders do not dispense with hierarchies; they recognize and respect their power. Instead, standing at the intersection of many constituencies, translational leaders knit together social networks that complement hierarchical power structures. Rooted in a spirit of respect and inclusion, these complementary connections ensure that when disruption strikes, all parts of the social system are invested, linked, and can talk to one another.
It sounds like they have a high degree of emotional intelligence or ego-control. That necessitates a leader that is reflective and operates from strength rather than weakness; a grounded mindful leader. 



****************************************
Another useful book sounds like this one.  

http://www.leadershipnow.com/leadershop/9780393310849.html


Adhocracy


Robert H. Waterman, Jr.



9780393310849
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Format: Paperback, 128pp.
ISBN: 9780393310849
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Pub. Date: October 1993

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Description and Reviews
From The Publisher:

The Power to Change

Adhocracy: Any form of organization that cuts across normal bureaucratic lines to capture opportunities, solve problems, and get results. 

In an era of accelerating change, organizations, and national economies, most likely to succeed are those with the ability to adjust and adapt. Robert H. Waterman Jr., coauthor of the best-selling In Search of Excellence, shows how and what this sort of innovation must become a way of life for business organizations across the board. What is needed is an environment that fosters the use of an ad-hoc problem-solving technique, in effect an "adhocracy" that functions outside the often initiative-stifling bureaucracy. 

Drawing on twenty-five years' experience in management consulting, Waterman offers clear instructions on how to establish adhocracy and make it work: creating task forces and independent business units, even two people meeting in a hallway to solve a common problem. A lively and insightful work, this should become an essential handbook for managers at all levels who recognize the need to redefine the rules for success.

.
Reviews

"It is, make no mistake, the best management answer for our chaotic times."
—Tom Peters


"Adhocracy is the single best treatment of innovation and teams that I've read anywhere. It's insightful and filled with practical information."
—Charles O'Reilly, University of California, Berkeley

 
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Reader's Index 
Send us your favorite quotes or passages from this book.

• "We’re controlled by ideas and norms that have outlived their usefulness, that are only ghosts but have as much influence on our behavior as they would if they were alive." Pg. 22 
 

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About the Author

Robert H. Waterman Jr. is author of The Renewal Factor: How the Best Get and Keep the Competitive Edge and coauthor of the New York Times bestseller In Search of Excellence: Lessons from America's Best-Run Companies.

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Table of Contents
1The Power of Adhocracy13
2The Right Start27
3Off and Running49
4Getting Results79
5The Context for Vibrant Adhocracy97
Index117


Sunday, November 29, 2015

this is the way

decide who you are
and be relentless
this is to say
change yourself
only for the work that must be done
systematic effort
results in alteration

decide who you are
and make the path as you go forward 
this is to say
none of us are given a map
to use    we have to navigate blind
and when we arrive
sometimes the destination has changed

decide who you are
and what you will do
in this small parade
we are all dancing molecules
and one day the motion will end
the silence will be eternal
and the graveyard is a place of darkness


decide who you are
and let no one alter who you wish to be
the final solution to pain
is to be real
this is how you make it through everything
don't think you are alone
for all of us will go through some part of this hell

decide who you are
and never alter yourself for their requirements 
instead be resolute and unbroken
although you have been scattered
this is the time for focus
systematically work for change
this is the way





that only the night ear hears

now here is the end of the day
the pale moon gleams in her tooth
the silver cloud lays down a blanket
of light
far away the marsh strums her cattail guitar
so that I might sleep
and the honey bees have made a path home
to the hive 
the river has turned over in its bed of stone
and fallen asleep in a sheet of paper-water
so that the footprints of the wind would be visible
the dam of the beaver points out the way to the end of the road 
the apple tree hangs its thin tinsel of snow on every limb
while the ash tree reddens in a blush of berries
everywhere the world has vanished
in the make up of that white polish
that was slathered down in a brush stroke so broad
as to cover everything
the fence is outline only


now here is the end of the day
and there    the moth of a poem comes closer
to the table lamp where it flames and falls
the slipper of the moon falls down
onto the marsh bed
the wasted willows wreck the shore line with their grim visage
the stories told by the grasses are all sibilant hisses
as the wind marches by
the hard doorknob of the day is turned
and night comes into view
who is this stranger? 
surely he has been away for too long?
the night brushes by with his swinging lantern of the moon
I watch the dutiful hill fall down on her knees before him in obeisance 
and vanish in that gray shadow-cloak 
all about the marsh the silver tassels of the cattails swing
and the harvest of the willows is reaped
the scythe of the moon prunes carefully 
as the wind passes her    through the kettle darkness
I stand by the window and watch
the rib of the night as it breaks free from the cloud chest
I watch as the rib falls


and here is the end of the day
with the slide down to sleep
the silver lips of the moon speak nonsense
that only the night ear hears
the tramping wind has broken the backs of the bugle weed
that have scattered their bones about the garden
the hard statues of the lilies smash under the footsteps of the night
everywhere I look there is a frozen tableau of the dead
the simple grasses are crusted in gems
and the climbing vines are backboned in ice
there is a hard point of metal in every leaf that blades through my hands
and the cold icicle of fruit falls from the apple tree
while the hare gnaws meditatively on the bark of the trunk
that has curdled it's milk
far away the marsh snickers and makes a joke
about summer
that bird that has flown
I can't see her
was she ever here?
in this wasteland there is only the flat iron of ice and frost everywhere 

This and That--Sunday November 29, 2015

Another busy day. I got the microwave for the parents and then discovered that their microwave was working. I left the new microwave for them. It's best to check their appliances before replacing them.  I went with younger boy to shovel snow at the family places and younger boy did a bit of physics 30 at home. He has  a few minutes on the computer before the cable is taken away for the rest of the week. He has to swot for his physics class and the only certain way he will do this is if we disable his computer and take away the rest of his stuff (IPod and cell phone).

I took a big Teddy Bear to my handicapped sister as well as some fruit. Her hair was a bird's nest so I spent some time tidying it up and French braiding it.  Then I came home to find older boy starving so I had to take him to some fast food place for disgusting food. No one wanted to eat the Shepherd's pie that I had made so I left it for tomorrow. I will cook the chicken on Tuesday.

Because the laundry has consumed most of the weekend I haven't had time to do much else. I worked on one of my projects today and then I had to buy more fruit (pineapple) since the boys will not eat anything unless it is prepared in small bites and given to them in containers. I prepared a few containers of fruit in this way for their lunches and also got the carrots/ celery sliced up for them. The sandwiches will have to be made tomorrow morning.

Mum had another fall today. She isn't using her walker as much as she should be. It's troubling. I will have to restart her exercise in the mall this coming week. Dad is still able to ambulate about but when he is tired he gets a bit tippy as well so I have made him use his cane.

As folks get older it is best to be by their side as they go about.

Soon I will fall asleep. I was supposed to do some writing practice but all I have done is laundry which is for some mysterious reason still not finished. It's as if they are hens and lay more and more eggs every time I get to the mud room.

I am listening to this song by Amelia Curran:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJbzlPRjC-0

Amelia Curran - In A Town

It's a beauty.
Maybe I will write a poem now.



surely you understand
that the root of it all
is the failure in character?

surely you see
that all about you
there is a façade   a pretence of reality?

surely you comprehend
the magnitude of the lies?
there is a web and we are bundled up for consumption


surely you will be able to resist
the lure of the sticky threads that bind you there?
surely you will see that the struggle is the only way out?


surely at the end you will be unbroken?
what was shattered will be put together again
with ink and deliberate action taken with calm certainty


and when this happens

put down the words
so that the stones themselves
would crack    and out of the rubble
of her life 
there would come a metamorphosis
in the world that exists
in continuing care
I waited for years for the world to remake itself
to accomodate the handicapped citizens in Alberta 
but then I discovered
that it is only when good men and women
come together to act relentlessly and calmly
with respect and kindness
will the culture change
so that the least among us are not blamed for their illnesses
but are instead understood to be sick and wounded
these citizens are to be accepted and not shunned 
we are to alter the culture of expediency
to one of service to them
instead of bureaucratic indifference
let us alter the system
so that we are responsive to the needs
of handicapped citizens
let us remake the framework
from one of moving families forwards
to that of a patient safety model
that allows for a just society
let us speak the language of the government of Alberta
so that we do not have a façade
but the reality of change in continuing care
work every day 
and go to the politicians so that they might do their work
to alter what exists in continuing care 
speak mildly and politely
but systematically alter
what is cobweb and ancient building
make over the old
so that we have what families want 
don't turn away from us
or turn us away from our goals of change in continuing care in Alberta
we are the drivers of the vehicles on this runway of change
we are pulling the carts of the stones
that we are breaking as we go forward
the culture of bureaucratic expediency will alter
to a just society culture
and when this happens
the old will fall away




I will say the stories of what happened to her

put down the words
year after year
and changed the world
for out of my stories
comes a new vision for the handicapped citizens 
I say to you all
that the culture of corruption
will give way
to a culture of a just society in our time

put down the words
year after year
and spoke for those among us without a voice
and who are cursed with powerlessness
I said that we must work together
to effect change in continuing care in Alberta
I said their names and their abuses
to all      but when the government changed
there was no alteration in what is     the power imbalance


put down the words
year after year
and did not give up
saw that the people were still silenced
and spoke up every single day for them
despite the others who left the cause
I kept going and worked systematically
you can only make change happen by following
the rules of the games that are played by the powerful in our society 

put down the words
year after year
and documented each and every event
so that I might go before the authorities
and speak in her name     I will not fall or fail as witness to these abuses
I will say the stories of what happened to her
and then I will ask these questions of the government
how was it all you failed my handicapped sister?
why was she left to fend for herself in these disasters?  





Saturday, November 28, 2015

This and that --Saturday November 29, 2015-----------Bob Sandford, Epcor chair of the Canadian Partnership Initiative in support of the United Nations “Water for Life” decade, says the technologies required to decrease water usage in unconventional drilling already exist. “What prevents these methods from being employed [in some cases] is the absence of the regulatory insistence and enforcement consistency that would ensure that operators institute such measures,” he says. That notion is shared by others. Emma Lui, national water campaigner for Council of Canadians, says provincial legislation is inadequate considering that widespread horizontal fracking in unconventional plays is relatively new to Canada. “Industry shouldn’t be left to self-regulate or adhere to voluntary standards,” Lui told Alberta Oil in an email.--------------However, Sandford says, sentiment against over-consumption is quickly rising in all regions, not simply in those with scarce freshwater supply. “It should be understood that the public will not continue to grant social license for ‘business as usual’ with respect to negative effects that subsurface energy activities may have or be perceived to have,” he says.---------Perhaps where the least tolerance will be allowed is in potential contamination of freshwater resources – surface or groundwater – supplying high-population regions. There is also the question of how to properly treat flowback water, and how to dispose of leftover sludge. Many existing wastewater treatment facilities are ill-equipped to return produced or flowback water back to a non-hazardous form. More water than ever is being reused in some regions as a result; however, there are still massive volumes of water that need to be treated and safely disposed of. Further complicating the treatment of produced flowback water is the sheer number of chemicals present in the fracturing fluid mix, as well as engineers’ knowledge of those chemicals. Several reactions occur subsurface throughout the fracking process, altering the chemical properties of the mix. The transformation that the fluid undergoes depends largely upon the local geology including mineral composition, and wellbore construction material.--

Once you take a luxury break it is hard getting back to ordinary life. I had to make a real effort today to pay bills, go grocery shopping, do the dishes and work on the laundry. I had got used to loafing and walking about in Vancouver and it was a big drop down the hatch to come back to Edmonton.

In Edmonton, snow sits like a big pillow over everything. I have the bedraggled Canada Day geranium and her babies in the mud room; they don't look very lively. I did not save the lives of any of the other plants in the garden; they have all turned into snow statues and it feels sad to see them solid rock in the front bed covered by the useless sheet. This is what procrastination leads to.
Meanwhile in Vancouver there is only a lip of frost about the pansies.

I am trying to get back to blogging  today. I am not very awake but since it feels rusty now in my head to write, I will have to make several blog posts on nothing in order to get back to writing shape. I will have to doodle for a few posts and hope that I will become fluent soon.

All the work I have done on the blog-- in the past sits up in an audience around me and waits for more deliveries of prose but frankly I do not want to write an investigative piece right now. I don't want to write prose; I want to write poetry. Nothing however sidles out of the corner of my mouth so I am stuck doodling.

I did do a bit of writing while I was on holidays but mostly I walked. It was hard on my legs that have turned to stone while I wrote for the past few years but I feel I could start up the laps program soon.

Today was all about the laundry and getting the family back on to real food. I made a few trips to the grocery stores to  pick up fruits and vegetables as well as real food. I used the rest of the left over chicken to make soup. I have a whole chicken in the fridge that I will use to make more roast chicken soon.  The supper was simple but fajitas are the best meal to combine a salad into a dish.

Since my head is so very slow I will concentrate on my to do list for tomorrow.
I will have to pay yet more bills again tomorrow and do the rest of the work up on the projects I am working on since I had to tackle the mountain of laundry in the mudroom today.

I am working on that new project I told you all about--that is about fracking.

I have the Alberta Mothers Against Fracking Project that also has to be started. I have a working group now with just two members.  Just making a working group is a big thing and I will work this project with Diana Daunheimer since we are the only mummies I know who are working to ensure that the information we have about fracking such as the massive use of water for this business--becomes more commonly known.

While I was at Vancouver I heard about the illegal use of water by one oil company:


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/nexen-fine-for-taking-water-from-bc-lake-a-slap-on-the-wrist/article27504995/?cmpid=rss1






Nexen fine for taking water from B.C. lake a ‘slap on the wrist’


Nexen Energy, the Canadian subsidiary of a Chinese state-run oil corporation, has pleaded guilty to damaging the habitat of a lake in northeastern B.C. by taking water for a nearby fracking operation, which violated its water licence.
The Calgary-based company, owned by the Chinese National Offshore Oil Corp., has agreed to pay $75,000 in fines, all but $1,000 of which will go to a Victoria-based environmental conservation charity, a clerk at the Fort Nelson Provincial Court said.
Lana Lowe, director of the Fort Nelson First Nation’s Lands and Resources Department, said she was disappointed with the amount the company was fined, which she called a “slap on the wrist.”
She said neither Nexen nor the government had “an understanding of the hydrology of the area” and added that “there’s still no baseline data collection” on the health of the region’s watersheds. She said that the $74,000 Nexen agreed to pay the non-profit Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation would be better used to bolster the environmental protections of the first nation’s traditional territory, which sits atop three of the province’s four shale gas fields undergoing hydraulic fracturing. (The charity supplies grants to people across the province with proposals that benefit fish, wildlife and habitat.)
“There’s very limited water monitoring and there’s still no water management planning happening in our territories and that’s something we want to do with B.C.,” Ms. Lowe said.
Brittney Price, a spokeswoman for Calgary-based Nexen, said in an e-mailed statement that the company respects the sentence and has implemented “additional monitoring and communications protocols.”
“We remain committed to engaging all our stakeholders near our Northeast B.C. operations, and to the health and safety of our employees, contractors, the environment and the communities where we operate,” her statement read.
In September, B.C.’s Environmental Appeal Board cancelled the remaining two and a half years of Nexen’s “fundamentally flawed” licence to withdraw 2.5 million cubic metres of water annually from North Tsea Lake, which kept the company’s nearby fracking operations running. The board found the company provided inadequate water data to secure the licence and, at points, the government “was unclear with the First Nation regarding the consultation process.”
The area went through a drought in the summer of 2012, but the company continued to withdraw water, which depleted the water level of the lake, damaged vegetation and likely harmed fish stocks. A local person informed the first nation’s leaders of the ongoing depletion, but the provincial government took more than five months to respond to the Fort Nelson’s complaint, Ms. Lowe said.
A government spokesman said on Thursday that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations was delayed by the company in assessing information surrounding the complaint.
Fort Nelson First Nation Chief Liz Logan said the Wednesday’s fines were “a long time coming” and hoped that such violations were rare in her traditional territory.
“This is one that has come to our attention, and I hope that it’s not part of a wider problem,” Chief Logan said. “We are doing our homework, we’re watching what’s going on in our territory.
“It’s unfortunate that we have to go so far as going to court and going to the environmental appeal board, but that’s what good stewardship’s about.”
She said her nation of about 800 people is committed to maintaining a good working relationship with the industry.
“That’s the only economy up here right now,” Chief Logan said. “We don’t have forestry, we don’t have mining, we don’t have anything else.
“So that’s where our people work.”
Follow  on Twitter: @MikePHager


You can see by this article that the BC government is like the Alberta government in terms of its lack of action with reference to water use by fracking companies.
I am not confident of anything government says about water use by oil and gas companies because they are not transparent about the amount of water being used to citizens. Also why don't the companies pay for the use of this water?  It's something I have long been puzzled by.

 I mean I have no problems if folks want to frack the world but I do have a problem with the lack of information regarding on the amount of water that is used to frack the world.   I think I should have information on just how much water is being used by the industry in Alberta. When I write to government about this matter I don't get very clear answers and this is troubling. Don't they know how much water is being used up for fracking? I decide to write again about water use to the government. The last set of answers was not very clear to me. Here are my questions:


Hi,
I am interested in water use by the oil and gas companies. Some of these companies use fracking which uses water that cannot be returned to the water cycle. 
I have a few questions about water use by these companies.

1) Do the oil and gas companies pay for the use of water?

2) How much water is used by the industry in Alberta?

3) How much water is used for fracking in Alberta?

4) Water used in fracking cannot be returned to the water cycle but is disposed of.
Where is the water disposed of?

5) Is there baseline water testing around fracking sites?

6) If there is baseline water testing is this testing done after fracking concludes to see if there are changes in water over time in the area of fracking?

7)What chemicals are reported in fracking cocktails?

8) Where is fracking done in Alberta?

9) Why don't we have public reporting on the use of water by fracking companies?

10) Why don't we have the results of contamination by fracking companies reported to us?  

We only know of fracking contamination because of citizens like Jessica Ernst and Diana Daunheimer. 

Why don't we get such information from the AER and the government of Alberta?


These are some of my questions.
Thanks for answering them.
Sincerely,
Julie Ali


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: <AlbertaConnects@gov.ab.ca>
Date: Sat, Nov 28, 2015 at 10:24 PM
Subject: RE: Water use (AC389191)
To:


**********This is an automatically generated email, please do not reply to this email. **********

Thank you for asking a question or sharing your thoughts with the Government of Alberta. We try to respond to all questions within 3 working days. If you need to visit us again, please visit Alberta.ca
Stay in touch

This site is frequently updated to provide you with important information about Alberta programs and services. It's also an opportunity for you to provide your government with feedback on the issues that concern you. Please visit our site again soon to read an article, or send a comment. Internet: Alberta.ca 
(AC389191) 

Your message was 
--
Water use
Hi, I am interested in water use by the oil and gas companies. Some of these companies use fracking which uses water that cannot be returned to the water cycle. I have a few questions about water use by these companies. 1) Do the oil and gas companies pay for the use of water? 2) How much water is used by the industry in Alberta? 3) How much water is used for fracking in Alberta? 4) Water used in fracking cannot be returned to the water cycle but is disposed of. Where is the water disposed of? 5) Is there baseline water testing around fracking sites? 6) If there is baseline water testing is this testing done after fracking concludes to see if there are changes in water over time in the area of fracking? 7)What chemicals are reported in fracking cocktails? 8) Where is fracking done in Alberta? 9) Why don't we have public reporting on the use of water by fracking companies? 10) Why don't we have the results of contamination by fracking companies reported to us? We only know of fracking contamination because of citizens like Jessica Ernst and Diana Daunheimer. Why don't we get such information from the AER and the government of Alberta? These are some of my questions. Thanks for answering them. Sincerely, Julie Ali
--
end of message.

**********This is an automatically generated email, please do not reply to this email. **********




************************************************************
So I send the questions again. Last time I got a response I still did not know how much water was being used by the oil and gas industry in Alberta.
It seems to me that water is the big issue in resource development.
I mean everyone is yapping about climate change but what's the point of that entire business if the water is used up or if it is contaminated?
I don't think the carbon capture junk is anything other than expensive public relations that will cost the citizens more money than it is worth.
Carbon capture is a gimmick and not worth the tax dollars.
The climate change hoopla is useless because it is not going to change individuals and that's where real change is needed. It's no point targeting corporations because they will do what they want to do but if citizens decide to change their consumption habits, then corporations will be forced to change. The corporate sector will only change when their profits are reduced. It's like government. The folks in government change only when their voter base changes and this only matters to MLAs and MPs at election time when we fire them.
At all other times, citizens are irrelevant to the bigwigs.

But I am getting off topic.
The water business is a big thing for me and I will yap about it as part of the Alberta Mothers Against Fracking Working Group.  How much water is being used by fracking in Alberta that will never be returned to the water cycle? I don't know.  I want to know.

We also don't know the real meal deal about fracking contamination and this sort of junk should be made public so that the citizens can determine for themselves if fracking is contaminating our land, air and water.  Personally I do not believe that we have enough information provided to us either by government or the industry--- to trust either of them with fracking; when we have the real costs of fracking before us I believe we won't be happy with the waste of water or the possibility of human consequences in terms of future cancers.

http://esrd.alberta.ca/water/water-conversation/documents/WaterFuture-SummaryDiscussions-2014.pdf

Our  Water, Our Future: A Conversation with Albertans, Summary of Discussions
Page 5

Hydraulic Fracturing and Water


-Greater public education is needed about hydraulic fracturing, including its nature and risks, where it presently occurs and where it might occur in the future.
-The Government of Alberta must be proactive, not reactive, in the regulation and monitoring of hydraulic fracturing operations.
-The integrity of groundwater sources is critical, and the government should redouble efforts to map aquifers and build knowledge on groundwater interactions.
-Hydraulic fracturing is not a good use of fresh water, so policies and regulations should be established to limit the use of fresh water by these operations.
-Strict controls around chemical use and waste disposal are essential.
-Enhance rules around maintaining well bore integrity, recognizing that external activities and age can impact integrity in the future.
-Undertake baseline water well testing before hydraulic fracturing operations are commenced, to better protect landowners and ensure accountability.
-Data and results of wells drilled using hydraulic fracturing should be documented and submitted to regulatory authorities.
-Regulations need to establish strict expectations on industry, backed by meaningful consequences should those expectations not be met.
-The surface effects of hydraulic fracturing should also be considered, since heavy equipment can compact soil, change water flows and compromise the ecosystem.
-Government of Alberta policies around natural resource development and water management are sometimes in conflict and need to be reconciled.
-Play-based and regional approaches should be used, to ensure that required procedures are appropriate for varying geological conditions across the province.
-To be effective, regulations need to be consistently enforced.




This is a good summary of the problems associated with fracking in Alberta.
This summary lists the questions that Albertans have about fracking and water use but where are the answers?
It's beginning to feel as if there will never be any answers because the industry and therefore government doesn't want the answers to reach us.
If that is the case, we have to as citizens, find out the answers for ourselves.
I have no sort of belief that government will do this sort of investigation and due diligence when all it is concerned about is generating more revenue to keep government going.
But that's my opinion of the business. Your opinion may be different. Government and the industry (AER) have not been worthy of our trust in this area as they are both only interested in short term profits (revenue) over long term consequences. As a result of the failures of government and successive energy regulators I don't trust their advertisements.   I prefer to trust ordinary citizens who have been impacted by the industry rather the myth making machinery of corporations and government (which might be the same matter). In any case the big problem for the fracking industry may not be citizens like myself who don't see the value of fracking the earth but the lack of water to do the fracking business. Water is the industry limiting factor:

http://www.albertaoilmagazine.com/2014/03/finite-supply-shale-revolution/

Why surging water consumption could end the shale gale

Emissions barriers used to pose the greatest threat to the shale revolution. Now, water consumption is the main concern
March 11, 2014
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In an arid southern and central Texas, where once-fertile farmland used to dominate the landscape, a different kind of development has taken hold. Today one sees well pad after well pad after well pad, interspersed with the odd ranch. Following three consecutive years of drought, some agricultural operations have closed due to the lack of available freshwater. Despite this there has been a surge of unconventional natural gas drilling, with each well consuming millions of gallons of water. Locals are baffled – where is all this freshwater coming from?
06_water_story1
Photograph Mike Robinson
With regard to freshwater consumption, the oil and gas industry is facing questions of its own. Amid a flurry of unconventional resource extraction in North America, over-consumption of dwindling water sources has become among the most controversial issues facing the energy sector. Because water is a lifeblood resource for all, its usage incites emotionally charged debates: environmentalists are in an uproar over decreasing freshwater supplies as well as potential groundwater and surface
water contamination.
Emissions performance is arguably still the primary environmental fighting ground in the oil and gas sector, but that could soon change. In some circles, it already has. Indeed, the limiting factor in future unconventional oil and gas production may not be commodity prices, or even restive environmentalists; some in the energy industry have admitted that if anything brings this unconventional boom to a halt, it will be depleted freshwater supplies.

Industry recognizes the urgency of the matter, and it is responding – albeit slowly. Companies are seeking out non-potable alternatives to freshwater that can stimulate wells while reducing freshwater consumption. Conventional natural gas extraction uses a great deal of water; unconventional methods are even more water-intensive: a single well may use up to 13 million gallons of water over its lifetime. In the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, freshwater (primarily surface sources) figures as the largest constituent in mixtures used to coax natural gas from unconventional wells.
So far, alternatives to freshwater in fracking operations still involve water; in some cases companies use recycled water, saline water, wastewater or seawater. Others use propane-based gel proppants or even acid-mine drainage solutions. But questions remain as to what alternative source is best in any given scenario. Now, more than ever, hydrocarbon producers are forced to wrestle with this complex challenge, which requires them to consider a host of interconnected factors such as the site’s local geology, proximity to water or alternative water sources, infrastructure requirements, and regional regulation.
“It should be understood that the public will not continue to grant social license for ‘business as usual’ with respect to negative effects that subsurface energy activities may have or be perceived to have.”
Brian Rahm, research associate with the New York State Water Resources Institute at Cornell University, says some fluids are ideal in certain scenarios, “depending on the depth and extent of the laterals, and distance of the frack.” Another issue is supply. If producers were to replace freshwater operations with a more hazardous alternative (highly saline or recycled water, say), environmental risk would increase markedly.
These limitations have left industry with a serious conundrum. But an increasing number of companies are developing more water-efficient methods of fracking as a result. Sanjel Corp. has engineered a suite of fracturing fluid technologies designed to perform in a wide variety of applications using non-potable water sources, including produced water, recycled water and saline water. Kim Day, manager of corporate applications and implementation, says Sanjel’s patented fracturing fluid systems are designed to be “robust and flexible, so that whatever makes sense for that day, that well, that geology and that customer” can be applied at a moment’s notice.
06_water_story2
An overhead view of well pads tapping into the Eagle Ford shale formation in South Texas
Photograph Amy Youngs
Suretech Completions Canada Ltd., a Calgary-based subsiduary of Sanjel, is one of many service firms offering technologies that can cut back on water consumption. Its SUREstack Retrievable Multistage Fracturing System reduces the use of water post-fracking by giving operators the ability to retrieve the balls and seats without need to mill or drill them out. GasFrac Energy Services Inc., another Calgary-based service company, has been selling its patented propane gel fracking method for years. While upfront costs for the technology are steep, GasFrac uses no water in its operations, and claims to offer longer-term cost reduction. “LPG (liquid propane gas) used in the closed GasFrac system is primarily propane, a naturally occurring hydrocarbon that is non-damaging to the formation,” says Eric Tudor, a spokesperson for the company.
Though GasFrac offers an alternative to excessive water use in fracking, propane is in certain situations less effective as a stimulus than water, which is essentially “non-compressible.” If water consumption is to be cut back in any meaningful way, some industry observers say, it will require more stringent regulation.
Bob Sandford, Epcor chair of the Canadian Partnership Initiative in support of the United Nations “Water for Life” decade, says the technologies required to decrease water usage in unconventional drilling already exist. “What prevents these methods from being employed [in some cases] is the absence of the regulatory insistence and enforcement consistency that would ensure that operators institute such measures,” he says. That notion is shared by others. Emma Lui, national water campaigner for Council of Canadians, says provincial legislation is inadequate considering that widespread horizontal fracking in unconventional plays is relatively new to Canada. “Industry shouldn’t be left to self-regulate or adhere to voluntary standards,” Lui told Alberta Oil in an email.
Currently, water regulation in Canada is arguably chaotic, and this may be the primary reason that some experts point to regulatory shortcomings. Governance of energy and water in North America spans the federal, state, provincial, territorial, regional and municipal levels – and those levels are often intersecting. Take, for example, that the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, which underlies parts of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and the Northwest Territories, falls under federal, provincial, territorial and, in places, even municipal regulatory jurisdiction.
If attempting to overhaul Canada’s water regulatory regime, one could look to the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC) as a model. The SRCB is an interstate regulatory authority that covers the states of Pennsylvania, New York and Maryland, though New York declared a moratorium on fracking in February of 2013. Unlike regulatory bodies in Canada and elsewhere in the U.S., the SRCB has the exceptional ability to permit or prohibit water withdrawals within its portion of the Marcellus and requires very little wrangling to do so. Each state, as well as the federal government, elects commissioners who regularly meet and vote over individual permits for water withdrawals. Their decision is the final one.
“Industry shouldn’t be left to self-regulate or adhere to voluntary standards.”
For the most part, however, the fervor over freshwater consumption or contamination will largely be voiced by local residents. This is especially true in U.S. plays like the Eagle Ford, where there is a much higher population density than anywhere in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. However, Sandford says, sentiment against over-consumption is quickly rising in all regions, not simply in those with scarce freshwater supply. “It should be understood that the public will not continue to grant social license for ‘business as usual’ with respect to negative effects that subsurface energy activities may have or be perceived to have,” he says.
Perhaps where the least tolerance will be allowed is in potential contamination of freshwater resources – surface or groundwater – supplying high-population regions. There is also the question of how to properly treat flowback water, and how to dispose of leftover sludge. Many existing wastewater treatment facilities are ill-equipped to return produced or flowback water back to a non-hazardous form. More water than ever is being reused in some regions as a result; however, there are still massive volumes of water that need to be treated and safely disposed of.
Further complicating the treatment of produced flowback water is the sheer number of chemicals present in the fracturing fluid mix, as well as engineers’ knowledge of those chemicals. Several reactions occur subsurface throughout the fracking process, altering the chemical properties of the mix. The transformation that the fluid undergoes depends largely upon the local geology including mineral composition, and wellbore construction material.

The ever-increasing limits of freshwater supplies, the risk of contamination of freshwater resources and the lack of adequate technologies to manage produced water from these wells are thus pressing issues for this industry. There is little information on efforts to reduce freshwater contamination by fracking, and even if freshwater use is reduced, produced and flowback water disposal still needs to be addressed.
To date, the challenge of treating flowback water has received little attention. But one thing is certain: water-related challenges faced by U.S. fracking operations may serve as warnings to Canadian producers. Water shortages seen in the U.S. could become a Canadian story in decades to come. The regulatory and technological developments to addressing the acute environmental challenge of depleting water supplies are lagging behind the pace of North America’s fast-expanding shale revolution. If this doesn’t change, the boom could soon give out.
Alexia Lane is the author of On Fracking, an exploration of fracking and the risks of freshwater over-consumption in the modern age
cyberclark says:
Much of the concern and conversation comes from the fracking in and around the water table! Damage and leaching into the water table is constantly denied by the operators.
This could be over come easily with a sampling pump put into the aquifer at 100 meters downstream and 500 and 1000 meters down stream. This is a relatively inexpensive check that has been avoided by the industry leading the world to believe the very worst is happening!
Such sampling holes into the water table could be remotely monitored and set to check for various and more frequent noxious stuff that definitely gets into the water. Why won’t industry and Government step up to the plate and do what is right?


So that's one project I will work on.
The spin from the AER is astonishing:

https://www.aer.ca/about-aer/spotlight-on/unconventional-regulatory-framework/what-are-the-impacts-on-water

What are the Impacts on Water?

Some people have expressed concerns that shale gas development uses too much water and might affect the quality of water.
The AER works to ensure that all oil and gas development takes place in a manner that protects groundwater and surface water resources.
WATER QUALITYIf addressed properly, there is very little risk to water quality. The following FAQs answer some of the concerns raised.  
Question: How does the AER ensure that hydraulic fracturing does not lead to groundwater contamination?
Answer: Most horizontal, multistage fractured wellbores are hundreds or thousands of metres below usable groundwater aquifers. Any vertical fractures that occur as a result of hydraulic fracturing are generally in range from tens of metres up to (rarely) 200 metres, making it extremely unlikely that fractures could impact groundwater. For shallow hydraulic fracturing operations, the AER has strict requirements that limit the proximity to water wells, restrict the fracturing fluid volumes that can be used, and specify the use of only nontoxic fracturing fluids to ensure groundwater protection.
Question: I’ve heard of reports of water contamination due to inadequate well construction. Can that happen in Alberta?
Answer: The AER has very strict requirements for cemented casing (wellbore construction includes the use of steel casing that is cemented into the wellbore) in wells to provide a barrier between the wellbore and any nearby water sources (see Directive 008: Surface Casing Depth Requirements,Directive 009: Casing Cementing Minimum Requirements, and Directive 083: Hydraulic Fracturing – Subsurface Integrity).
Question: Hydraulic fracturing operations use water, but they also bring water from deep underground to the surface. In other jurisdictions, these fluids have been stored in open unlined pits or treated and reintroduced into waterways leading to contamination of water sources. Does this happen in Alberta? 
Answer: The AER strictly forbids the use of unlined storage pits to store fluids produced from fracturing operations. Fluids that cannot be recycled or reused must be reinjected and stored in rock formations deep underground, far below groundwater sources.
***************************************
Now the AER is saying that they do not allow use of unlined storage pits but I seem to remember that there was chatter in government publications of this practice. So is there still use of unlined storage pits? They say it happens elsewhere but not in Alberta. Have to check with rural Albertans so find out if this government chatter is correct.

http://esrd.alberta.ca/water/water-conversation/documents/WaterFuture-ConversationAlbertans-Feb2013.pdf

Pages 17-18

-Water use
The greater use of hydraulic fracturing stands to increase the oil and gas industry's demand for water supplies in the province. It will be necessary to manage the level of water used to protect the interests of other water users while still enabling resource development.

-Fracturing fluid
Hydraulic fracturing involves the use of fracturing fluid. After fracturing, between 10 and 75 percent of the fracturing fluid flows back the surface. There have been concerns that members of the public do not know the chemical composition of this fluid and worry that improper storage and use of these chemicals could contaminate groundwater supplies. Reporting the chemicals used to drill and complete energy wells has been a requirement for some time in Alberta. The information has been a requirement for some time in Alberta. The information has been collected but not always provided in a way that was easily accessible to the public as the focus was on reporting for regulatory requirements. The ERCB now requires disclosure of the ingredients in fracture fluids on a well by well basis. This information is to be publicly available on the website FracFocus.ca.

-Wastewater
Hydraulic fracturing operations can also produce water. Water can be returned from the fracturing process itself (flowback), and reservoir water can be produced along with the oil or gas. In other jurisdictions, these fluids have been stored in open unlined pits or treated and reintroduced into waterways. There is a need to continue to ensure that water produced from fracturing operations is dealt with appropriately and strictly, so that Alberta's water sources are not contaminated.

-Public assurance
Members of the public want to be assured that the use of hydraulic fracturing does not damage water sources or make water supplies unhealthy.  Alberta's regulatory framework for oil and gas development needs to provide effective oversight of the technology's use, to avoid the impacts to surface water or groundwater sources.




The other project is the handicapped sister.
Then there is younger boy.
Younger boy is failing physics 30 so I had a severe talk with him about the matter. He will repeat the class next semester. I don't know how he will do with the course next semester but I won't worry now.