Tuesday, June 30, 2015

--Huguette Hebert says she was once banned from the Covenant Health facility her husband was staying at because she wanted to stay in the room while he was being changed.-------------She claims she had been allowed to do that for months before, but that day, staff wouldn’t let her, telling her it was against the policy. Hebert says a security guard was called, and when she resisted leaving, she was banned for what ended up being a day. “I very quietly moved towards my husband, who was frightened – I could see on his face that he was extremely anxious…So I whispered to him, ‘I love you, everything will be fine.’ I kissed him on one side, on the other side, and hugged him. And then I picked up my belongings and left.”-------Shauna McHarg has also been battling Covenant Health. She says she hasn’t been able to see her father for almost two years, and has had her visiting time restricted with her mother.----------“It seems to me that there’s often a knee-jerk reaction: ‘well, if you don’t like what we’re doing, you know, you’re out of here. It’s our way or the highway,'” said Allan Garber, a lawyer who works in this field.--------------Will things become worse for me if I raise a complaint? No. Your feedback is important to us and is seen as an opportunity to improve our services. Alberta Health Services values your input and is committed to addressing all complaints in a fair and objective manner. Alberta legislation is in place to uphold a patient’s right to express their complaints with health services. The Patient Concerns Resolution Process Regulation (Alberta Regulation 124/2006) requires Alberta Health Services appoints a Patient Concerns Officer. The Patient Concerns Officer / Executive Director of Patient Relations oversees the Patient Relations Department that is responsible for receiving, investigating and responding to complaints regarding health services, or other support services, provided to patients.--------------------------the two sisters write on blogs / and go to the media / seeking whatever help they can get / because sure as peas sit in pods / there won't be anyone at AHS / resolving these problems / for the patient relations office / is present to pretend only

and these things happened
you rise
and you fall
you have troubles
and horrors
you lose faith
and you find your heart
in the deepest pit
inside the graveyard of your soul
but you tell yourself
to keep going
you must have faith
in the work of good men and women
who are present
in the destroyed structure of the society
all the abasement
that she has endured
will be over soon
you tell yourself this
as yet another
speeding car
bowls you over
and you fall again


and these things happened
you rise
and you fall
as do we all
there are accidents and failures
but they need not repeat continually 
we are human beings
and we are error prone
but to see
deliberate refusals
to alter the situation
this is hard to accept
and then the factory of spin
they ban you
and then at the board meeting
the upper manager tells you
that you were banned after your sister
was evicted
(so this must be better than
being banned while she is retained)
finally they indicate
that I was never banned (despite the voice recording)
I get dizzy
surely they have a hard time keeping track
of bannings if they operate in this inconsistent way?



and these things happened
you rise
and you fall
the handicapped sister lies in a room 
where the television flickers
the two sisters write on blogs
and go to the media
seeking whatever help they can get
because sure as peas sit in pods
there won't be anyone at AHS
resolving these problems
for the patient relations office
is present to pretend only
the pretending is all about
patients and residents first
this is a new concept 
that has just been discovered
apparently 
because under the Tories
it was always citizens last
the rules are broken
the AHS policies and procedures
float away as nebulous entities
we aren't even sure what rules
each zone follows
or what regulations are province wide
we stand at the gate of chaos
and we realize
it has always been this way 
under the Tories
this how they worked


http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/services.asp?pid=service&rid=1033502

Home > Programs & Services

Patient Relations Department

Alternate names: Executive Director of Patient Relations, Patient Concerns and Feedback (previous)
This service is where patients, family members, and the public may express complaints about the health services they receive through Alberta Health Services (AHS). It also receives suggestions, and compliments and acts as a resource for both patients and AHS staff and practitioners during the Patient Concerns Process. Staff and practitioners may be involved with:
  • receiving and acknowledging a complaint
  • obtaining information from the complainant about their complaint
  • explaining the patient concerns resolution process and identifying the next steps to the complainant
  • assisting with coordination and communication of the patient feedback process with the public, staff, practitioners and management
  • acting as an ongoing contact for the complainant, including updates to the patient concerns resolution process
  • documentation of the process and outcome of the complaint
  • the Patient Relations Department, led by the Patient Concerns Officer and the Executive Director of Patient Relations, is available to work with patients and AHS leaders to resolve a complaint until all possible avenues within AHS have been explored.
The following options are available for resolving a complaint:
Option 1
Discuss your concern with your care team. Because your care team knows you best, discussing your concern with them may resolve the issue right away.  You may also ask the manager of the program or service area for help.
Option 2
Contact the Patient Relations Department by telephone, fax or mail:
  • Telephone: 1-855-550-2555
  • Fax: 1-877-871-4340
  • Mail:
    Patient Concerns Officer and Executive Director, Patient Relations
    Mail Slot #57, 11111 Jasper Avenue
    Edmonton, Alberta  T5K 0L4
  • Online feedback form: https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/273.asp .
Once we hear from you, a Patient Relations Representative will be in touch with you by phone within three business days. This person will clarify the details of your concern, and staff will work with you to resolve the concern.

Accessing the service - more information:

This service can be accessed by phone, mail or web.

Service locations

Please visit the links below for more details about this service at various locations.



http://www.health.alberta.ca/documents/PMD-Patient-Concerns-Escalated-PCO.pdf


Performance Measure Definition
Number and percentage of patient concerns escalated to PCO 


 Alberta Health


© Government of Alberta
Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Escalated Patient Concerns to Patient Concerns Officer that have been through Patient 
Relations Department 





Name
 Business Planning Document URL

AHS Strategic Direction 2009-2012,
June 30, 2009
http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/org/ahs-org-strategic-direction.pdf


http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/patientfeedback.asp


Patient Concerns & Feedback

patient concerns 

Important:

Alberta Health Services values your input; we want to hear from you. Your feedback will help us further improve the quality of Alberta’s health care system.
Your experience of care holds important information that helps us to continuously improve.  We want to hear what you have to say so we can better understand what we're doing right and what we can do better. 
If you want to share your feedback regarding healthcare services or other support services you or a family member has received, there are three options for you to do so:
Your Options:
  • You can talk to your local health care provider directly. Whenever possible we first encourage you to speak with your care team. Because your care team knows you best, discussing your questions or complaints with them may resolve any issues right away. This is often the best way to proceed. You can also ask the manager or supervisor for help.  
  • Contact the Patient Relations Department by phone, fax or mail.
  • You can complete an online patient feedback form.
If you have compliments for staff, physicians or volunteers, or suggestions on how we can improve health services, please use one of the options to let us know.  Alberta Health Services is committed to working with you to resolve complaints as soon as possible.

What can I expect when I share feedback?

  • We will listen and respond with privacy and respect
  • We will gather information and investigate if you have a complaint
  • A response will be provided
  • At the conclusion of the review further options will be provided to you
There is no time limit to share your feedback; it is reviewed when it is received. However, it is best to bring any complaints forward quickly so they can be resolved. If you have a complaint, it will be addressed through the Patient Concerns Resolution Process. Patient Feedback Intake Coordinators and Patient Concerns Consultants are ready to assist, and will work with you and the other parties involved to reach a resolution.

Will things become worse for me if I raise a complaint?

No. Your feedback is important to us and is seen as an opportunity to improve our services. Alberta Health Services values your input and is committed to addressing all complaints in a fair and objective manner.
Alberta legislation is in place to uphold a patient’s right to express their complaints with health services. The Patient Concerns Resolution Process Regulation (Alberta Regulation 124/2006) requires Alberta Health Services appoints a Patient Concerns Officer. The Patient Concerns Officer / Executive Director of Patient Relations oversees the Patient Relations Department that is responsible for receiving, investigating and responding to complaints regarding health services, or other support services, provided to patients.

Alberta Ombudsman

As part of the Patient Concerns Resolution Process, the complainant is also informed of their right to contact the Alberta Ombudsman to request an external review should they feel the process used to review their complaint was not fair.
You may contact the Alberta Ombudsman’s Office by phone: 780-427-2756 or 403-297-6185  or visit www.ombudsman.ab.ca for more information.

Privacy and Confidentiality

AHS protects the privacy of individuals receiving health services in accordance with the Health Information Act. To properly review and resolve complaints, we work with the patient, or an authorized representative (usually a close family member), to gather and share information about the services received.

Health Advice and Information

If you require health advice or information, in Alberta dial 811 for Health Link anytime: 24 hours a day, seven days a week.







February 27, 2014 7:38 pm
Updated: February 27, 2014 10:53 pm

Family members call for change to seniors care system after being banned from seeing their loved ones

patricia.kozickaBy Patricia KozickaLifestyle and Special Projects Reporter  Global News
EDMONTON – The frustration is boiling over for some people in Alberta. They feel the seniors care system has let them down because restrictions have been put in place when it comes to seeing their loves ones.
On Thursday morning, a number of people tearfully shared their stories of being restricted or outright banned from visiting a family member in care.
Huguette Hebert says she was once banned from the Covenant Health facility her husband was staying at because she wanted to stay in the room while he was being changed.

RELATED

She claims she had been allowed to do that for months before, but that day, staff wouldn’t let her, telling her it was against the policy.
Hebert says a security guard was called, and when she resisted leaving, she was banned for what ended up being a day.
“I very quietly moved towards my husband, who was frightened – I could see on his face that he was extremely anxious…So I whispered to him, ‘I love you, everything will be fine.’ I kissed him on one side, on the other side, and hugged him. And then I picked up my belongings and left.”
Hebert isn’t alone in her experience.
Shauna McHarg has also been battling Covenant Health. She says she hasn’t been able to see her father for almost two years, and has had her visiting time restricted with her mother.
McHarg is in the process of seeking documents which detail why that is — a fight that’s gone all the way to the courts.
She claims an adjudicator ruled back in August for Covenant Health to provide her with the records.
“Covenant Health went to judicial review, rather than provide me with the records,” McHarg said. “So, that would make me think that there’s something to hide.”
The VP of Medicine & Chief Medical Officer for Covenant Health, Dr. Jeff Robinson, says that while he can’t comment on specific cases, he’s “very confident” that “every effort possible” is made to explain all the circumstances to those involved in cases like this.
“We never try to rush through it, unless there is a direct threat to the patient,” said Robinson. “And we try to make sure that everybody understands. They may not agree, but we do our best effort to make sure that they understand.”
One example he gave of a situation that may result in a person being kept from seeing a loved one is if the visits end up being too agitating for the patient, who may suffer from mental illness.
Public Interest Alberta is challenging the province to investigate and stop seniors care facilities and other health facilities that decide to ban family members without due process — something it believes is happening far too much.
“This is just the tip of the iceberg,” said the organization’s executive director, Bill Moore-Kilgannon of the cases presented on Thursday.
“We know from our travels around the province that there are many, many more.”
“It seems to me that there’s often a knee-jerk reaction: ‘well, if you don’t like what we’re doing, you know, you’re out of here. It’s our way or the highway,'” said Allan Garber, a lawyer who works in this field.
He hopes to see a system put in place soon that would allow a review of these decisions.
Alberta Health Minister Fred Horne , though, insists these incidents are rare, and that the province has good processes to deal with them when they do come up.
“I think we should be focused on the needs of patients and staff in our facilities,” he said.
The province recently announced details of a new health advocate office, which could be another way people can voice their complaints. It’s expected to be running by April.
Whether that will be enough to help those who feel shut out by the current policies remains to be seen.
With files from Vinesh Pratap, Global News



http://alberta.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=648793


Bans and Evictions from Health Facilities
Part 1

http://alberta.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=647813


Bans and Evictions from Health Facilities
Part 2




---What was the real problem for the PCs under Mandel and crew as well as Horne and crew? The real problem was that of exposing the failures of the Tories. Most families don't know how to expose problems in a credible fashion. They will understand that there are failures in care, they will see their family members in distress but they can't navigate the medical system or the long term care system in a productive fashion. They don't know about medicine. They don't understand the language of illness and how to frame their complaints. They are at a major disadvantage. In contrast, the folks at AHS, Alberta Health and the continuing care providers under the Tories, knew how the system worked and how to ensure that the families were moved forward so that their complaints were resolved in harsh and effective ways--by inappropriate transfers, evictions and banning. The power under the Tories was in the hands of the health regions and eventually in the hands of the folks at AHS. There has been no appeal process for transfers. There has been no continuing care policy/ procedure manual made visible to families and residents. We have endured a system that has failed the most vulnerable residents in care and for what purpose? To ensure that the PCs remain as the perfect political party. When the problems were brought up in the house of corruption the health ministers either looked confused in the case of Fred Horne or did the usual baloney of it being the fault of the advocates for not following rules as in the case of the Stephen Mandel guy.---------------Here is the problem. I have no power. The fighting between the powerful AHS figures like Deborah Gordon and the powerful CEO of the Good Samaritan Society is not something that I can do anything about. I am here to advocate for my sister. No one has mentioned that small fact that the abuse cases were founded. No one has told me what they will do for my sister. No one talks about my sister at all. She is being punished because I did not follow the rules of the Tories. What rules are these? The rules of being afraid, of being intimidated and keeping silent. Yes, these are the good Tory rules that operated in Alberta for 44 years until we finally kicked the buggers out of power. We still have the 9 PCs left to evict but with all the yapping of families of folks in long term care, with all the revelations of entitlement at the ABCs (agencies, boards and commissions), with all the hunting for the major money that is not present in the Heritage Trust Fund, I can assure you that the PCs are not coming back to power ever again.--------------------------Yes, I broke the Tory rules. These rules are now done with. We have the NDP in power now. We will not be afraid to say the problems in continuing care that were ignored by the Tories, AHS and Alberta Health until they reached the media. We will not be afraid.-----

The climate of fear in continuing care facilities is extraordinary. Most families are at a disadvantage in that they do not know how hospitals or long term care facilities function. I have some background in the proper operations of a hospital as I have been a medical laboratory technologist. I understand what work is done in a medical system and I see the way things have been under the PCs which was all about silencing folks.  In the case of my handicapped sister, when we went to  Alberta Health we were told we could have this problem go away. But of course we did not have this experience. The problem is continuing.

What was the real problem for the PCs under Mandel and crew as well as Horne and crew? The real problem was that of exposing the failures of the Tories. Most families don't know how to expose problems in a credible fashion. They will understand that there are failures in care, they will see their family members in distress but they can't navigate the medical system or the long term care system in a productive fashion. They don't know about medicine. They don't understand the language of illness and how to frame their complaints. They are at a major disadvantage.

In contrast, the folks at AHS, Alberta Health and the continuing care providers under the Tories, knew how the system worked and how to ensure that the families were moved forward so that their complaints were resolved in harsh and effective ways--by inappropriate transfers, evictions and banning. The power under the Tories was in the hands of the health regions and eventually in the hands of the folks at AHS. There has been no appeal process for transfers. There has been no continuing care policy/ procedure manual made visible to families and residents. We have endured a system that has failed the most vulnerable residents in care and for what purpose? To ensure that the PCs remain as the perfect political party.  When the problems were brought up in the house of corruption the health ministers either looked confused in the case of Fred Horne or did the usual baloney of it being the fault of the advocates for not following rules as in the case of the Stephen Mandel guy.

Yeah, advocates have to follow rules but not the continuing care providers. Why is this the case? Why is it that I complained so many times and yet no sort of complaint resolution process was followed? Despite the lack of responses, AHS has the gall to say that the Good Samaritan extended care at Millwoods has an appropriate complaint resolution process in place! I have a record of e-mails that were never responded to and I guess no answers is an appropriate complaint resolution process for AHS since this is the way AHS deals with complaints as well. AHS ignores complaints until citizens go to the press to raise awareness in the failures of AHS to audit facilities appropriately. Under the Tories the families had to be the true auditors and find out life threatening situations simply because staff did not know how to press a button on a BiPaP machine. Yet they were apparently so challenged by this matter of training staff to turn on a machine that the Good Samaritan Society yaps in today's Alberta Primetime episode about the specialized respiratory care that my sister needs that they cannot provide now. They had apparently provided this care for five years but only after I blogged about the failures to respond to my concerns did they suddenly find that the resident who was stable in December 2014 is now someone that they can't take care of. So odd. The final note on the medical files states that it was Julie's blog that was responsible for the eviction and not the "specialized" respiratory care which is the problem.  I guess for the Good Samaritan Society that matter of pressing a button on a BiPaP machine is too much to train their staff to do when they are being exposed for failures in meeting the standards of care.

These failures in meeting the standards of care are not limited to respiratory care. The Alberta Health audit revealed other problems that I had no idea about. This again raises that interesting question. What the heck was AHS doing when all this junk was going on?  No respiratory therapist for two years out of the five years my sister was at this place. No sort of individualized care programs for any of the respiratory residents. There was a physiotherapist that suddenly appeared in 2015; I had not seen one for the five years prior. The residents who were stuck in their chairs like small dolphins out of sea suddenly had someone who could work with them with reference to mobility issues. The folks at the administration accused me of interfering with the other residents when really how could one interfere by saying friendly comments to them? Or did they want me to stay sterile and not say hello to anyone? What is the matter with the Good Samaritan Society? Just because they are losing money on the respiratory program --is not a reason to penalize my sister. Just because they were not able to get Deborah Gordon at AHS to give them more money why should my sister be dumped in the Grey Nuns Hospital?  Who is Deborah Gordon? She was mentioned by the CEO as the person that he had contacted about underfunding due to patient care based funding.  At the meeting with the Good Samaritan Board, we were told that underfunding was the problem for the staff not putting on a button on a BiPaP machine. I told the CEO that you don't need more money to get all staff trained to put a button on a machine. He didn't get this concept.


In any case Deb Gordon should have been yapping with the Good Samaritan Society in my mind because there was no sort of effort made by the upper managers and CEO to resolve the respiratory program shortcomings at all.  My sister went from one adverse event to the next. The adverse events were repeated for no reason other than failures to utilize an adverse event protocol and failures of AHS to enter the situation early on to prevent repeated adverse events.



In collaboration with her dyad partner, Dr. David Mador, and the Edmonton and North Zone senior leadership teams, Deb is responsible and accountable for health services delivery in northern Alberta. She is also the Interim Executive Lead for Emergency Medical Services (EMS).
Deb is a senior leader with experience and expertise in urban and rural health service delivery; acute tertiary and quarternary care; academic health centres; professional and collaborative practice, including nursing and health professions; clinical workforce planning, and leadership.
Deb is a registered nurse who earned Certified Health Executive (CHE) designation from the Canadian College of Health Leaders in 2003, a Masters of Business Administration from the University of Alberta in 2000, and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of British Columbia in 1985.
She is dedicated to safe, quality patient care. She has an equally strong commitment to supporting staff and physicians. Deb is a dynamic and enthusiastic health services executive.
When she is not at work, Deb loves spending time with family and friends. She also loves travelling, curling and shopping.


Here is the problem. I have no power. The fighting between the powerful AHS figures like Deborah Gordon and the powerful CEO of the Good Samaritan Society is not something that I can do anything about. I am here to advocate for my sister.

No one has mentioned that small fact that the abuse cases were founded. No one has told me what they will do for my sister. No one talks about my sister at all. She is being punished because I did not follow the rules of the Tories. What rules are these? The rules of being afraid, of being intimidated and keeping silent. Yes, these are the good Tory rules that operated in Alberta for 44 years until we finally kicked the buggers out of power. We still have the 9 PCs left to evict but with all the yapping of families of folks in long term care, with all the revelations of entitlement at the ABCs (agencies, boards and commissions), with all the hunting for the major money that is not present in the Heritage Trust Fund, I can assure you that the PCs are not coming back to power ever again.

I'm not even sure the conservative brand will survive the revelations of families who will blog about their families in long term care. Don't think I won't be blogging. I have a ton of information to put out on the blogs I will write. I will do this over YEARS.  I will say what happened to a severely handicapped patient at the Good Samaritan extended care at Millwoods while professional staff knew of the abuse and turned away from it. I will say all these good men and women believed my sister's situation was due to her own non-compliance. I will say that this was part of the problem but the major part of the problem was that nursing staff--RNs and LPNs were expected to do respiratory work that should have been done by the respiratory therapist who should have been present at this facility. One was present in the beginning and at odd times throughout the mess but no one did the data card downloads until I did them in 2014.

No one wanted to do the data card downloads because this took time, effort and money.

This is to say they did no sort of quality control and in fact, no data card was in my sister's defunct BiPaP machine until I secured a new machine in 2014 with a data card in it. This is odd isn't it? Why did the Good Samaritan Society give my sister a BiPaP machine without a data card in it? We might wonder also why no sort of data card readings were done after Tina left the facility in 2010.  It's a mess.

I wonder who cares about the one who suffered the most in this mess?
My handicapped sister.
My poor baby sister.
The one who got the worst of all this junk of cutbacks, and stupidity and failures in care was my sister.
But she was the lucky one.
She had two sisters who cared enough about her to speak out.

Yes, I broke the  Tory rules.
These rules are now done with.
We have the NDP in power now.
We will not be afraid to say the problems in continuing care that were ignored by the Tories, AHS and Alberta Health until they reached the media.
We will not be afraid.

We will keep speaking until the 44 years of fear and intimidation are over in long term care in Alberta.
Bye bye Tories.
Your era of silencing us ---is finally over.

http://alberta.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=648793


Bans and Evictions from Health Facilities
Part 1

http://alberta.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=647813


Bans and Evictions from Health Facilities
Part 2

https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaPrimetime?fref=nf


Should health facilities be able to ban people from visiting friends and family in care?
 · Comment · 
  • Naydene Lewis, Trish Bodnaryk and Jacen Pekara like this.
  • Mary Lynn Nikles The real question is..Why are these facilities allowed to run without the proper level of expertise amongst their staff? PCA's are expected to provide a level of care that is way beyond their scope.
    2 · 4 hrs
  • Terry McGinnis The only reason this would be brought up is the fact that they do not want to let their loved ones see how cruel the patients are being treated.How bad is the care of the elderly getting the answer is real bad.Starve the patients and increase the profits.
    1 · 4 hrs

The Heritage Savings Trust Fund was reported to be $17.9 billion. Total capital debt climbed to $11.9 billion.

Alberta's long string of deficits ended by billion-dollar surplus

Published on: June 30, 2015 | Last Updated: June 30, 2015 4:58 PM MDT
Finance Minister Joe Ceci
Finance Minister Joe Ceci LARRY WONG / EDMONTON JOURNAL
Despite predictions of gloom and doom, the province posted a surplus last year of more than $1 billion, no matter how it’s counted.
The previous Tory government initially forecast a $514-million surplus last year, but when oil prices plummeted last fall, premier Jim Prentice warned Alberta could end up in the red.
The 2014-15 consolidated surplus of $1.1 billion ends of string of six consecutive deficits and boosts the province’s contingency fund to $8.2 billion — a reserve Finance Minister Joe Ceci says will come in handy in dealing with the drop in non-renewable resource revenue.
“Going forward the climate — the economy today — is very different from it was then,” he told reporters at the legislature Tuesday as the NDP government released the final year-end numbers.
But Ceci said he was reluctant to use the cash savings to fill the projected revenue void.
“If we can find a way to achieve greater revenue stability without the use of the contingency account — though it’s probably not possible — that would be my first desire,” said the Calgary MLA.
“Philosophically, I think contingencies are there to smooth things out. They’re not there to totally drain the bank account.”
Although the price of oil has stayed below $60 US per barrel for much of this year, Ceci said he hoped new corporate tax increases and hikes in personal income tax for the wealthiest Albertans will meet some of the projected shortfall.
He also mused about other “revenue measures,” but would not elaborate.
During the spring election, the NDP campaigned on a budget with a projected $5.4-billion deficit — $400-million more red ink than was forecast in the PC budget for 2015-16 that was released in March.
The final Tory budget, however, was never passed as the Prentice government called an early election, which it lost to Rachel Notley’s NDP.
PC interim Leader Ric McIver said the fact the province recorded a hefty surplus during a period of falling oil prices proves the former government was fiscally prudent and left the province in strong economic shape.
“The government did control expenditures last year because it was the right thing to do,” said McIver, former labour minister in the Prentice government.
“This annual report is a good sign post to go look at what good shape Alberta is in overall.”
But Wildrose finance critic Derek Fildebrandt said the report doesn’t reflect the deteriorating state of Alberta’s finances because it relies on the same accounting methods that were employed by the former PC government.
The Wildrose MLA said the provincial government paid out more than $780 million to finance interest payments on debt last year, and Alberta remains on pace to top $30 billion in debt by 2019.
“When you collect record revenues and still have to take out billions in debt, the real problem is overspending,” Fildebrandt said in a statement.
“The NDP plan of raising spending faster than they can raise taxes just isn’t sustainable.”
Ceci would not comment on the size of the projected deficit for the current fiscal year, which began April 1. The NDP don’t plan to table their own budget until October.
Alberta Finance officials say higher-than-expected revenues from taxes and investments in the first six months of last year offset the impact of lower oil prices in the fall.
Although bitumen royalties fell $530 million, the province still brought in $8.9 billion in non-renewable resource revenue.
The Heritage Savings Trust Fund was reported to be $17.9 billion. Total capital debt climbed to $11.9 billion.
The PC government reported a $755-million surplus in 2013-14, but under its new consolidated reporting, that surplus was actually a $302-million deficit. The new reporting method now includes revenue, expenses, assets and liabilities from schools, universities, colleges and health facilities as well as pension liabilities.
Under the previous financial reporting method, which was criticized by opposition parties and the provincial auditor general, the surplus in 2014-15 would have been reported as $1.4 billion.
dhenton@calgaryherald.com

Because of the PCs' creative accounting it is hard to figure out if we really have a surplus or are in a deficit position. I will wait until we get the Auditor General's review of the provincial finances before I believe anything the government of Alberta tells us. I used to be able to understand their budgets but the Redford reorganization of budgets makes me feel that the government was hiding information from us. I could not figure out the budgets under the Redford.
We are given some plain numbers here.
It is hard to believe there is a surplus when the Prentice was yapping endlessly about no money for kids in schools. The big fibs that the PCs tell us will now be revealed to us.
I am struck by the lack of money in the Heritage Trust Fund.

http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/albertas-long-string-of-deficits-ended-by-billion-dollar-surplus

The Heritage Savings Trust Fund was reported to be $17.9 billion. Total capital debt climbed to $11.9 billion.


Why do we have so little in it? Where did the money go?
And who will do the detective work to find out where this money went?
We should have much more cash in that savings fund for our kids and grandkids.
If we have only $17.9 billion for all the subsidies we have provided to big oil in Alberta that's a poor return for our efforts especially after the debt is factored in at $11.9 billion.  Heck this makes me wonder if all the money was wasted on every rural hospital from here to Grande Cache.

This is not a good financial situation but it could be worse I guess. We could have the PCs in power sprouting more budget calamity stories.

The money in the Heritage Trust Fund should be increased. We should be in a better financial position than this.

We need to do much better than this. If we even follow the example of Alaska we would be in better financial shape now.
http://albertaventure.com/2014/05/non-renewable-resource-revenue/

What could have been
Between 1981 and 2010, the Alberta government contributed $9.1 billion to the Heritage Fund. Here’s what they could have socked away under different scenarios – and remember, this is just contributions. The value of the fund could conceivably be far greater depending on how much of the fund’s net income was withdrawn and spent by the government each year.
08_Money_story3

The money saved in Alaska is much more than in the Heritage Trust Fund.

I am curious why we don't have more cash in the Heritage Trust Fund. They have $53 billion dollars.
http://www.apfc.org/home/Content/home/index.cfm
APFC
Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation




 APFC Board to hold special meeting in Anchorage

JUN 30 – The Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation Board of Trustees will hold a special meeting to review, discuss and confirm the recruitment process for the position of Executive Director of the APFC on Friday, July 10, at 1:30 p.m. The meeting will take place in Room 670 (Department of Revenue Conference Room) in the Atwood Building, 550 West Seventh Avenue, in Anchorage. There will be an opportunity for public comment.

 Burns retires from Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation

JUN 1 - The Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation Board of Trustees met via telephone for a special meeting on June 1, 2015 to discuss the Corporation’s CEO position.

 APFC Board amends investment policy, approves private asset commitments

MAY 21 - The Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation Board of Trustees amended the APFC’s investment policy and approved private asset commitments for fiscal year 2016 at a regular meeting in Anchorage on May 19 and 20.
unaudited, as of Jun 29, 2015
US Bonds$10,521,900,000
US Stocks$6,186,800,000
Non US Stocks$9,596,100,000
Global Stocks$6,016,800,000
Non-US Bonds$1,071,500,000
Real Estate$6,054,800,000
Cash$752,700,000
Alternatives$11,144,300,000
Real Return/External CIO$2,202,200,000
TOTAL$53,547,100,000
Sep29-30, 2015Anchorage
Dec08-09, 2015Anchorage