Saturday, February 28, 2015

--Eviction notice-----------Evictions of Albertans from long term care--post #1 ----------“This is unfortunate,” said Pam Brown, the authority’s executive director for integrated seniors health in Calgary. “We do feel a lot of concern and empathy for how these residents and their families feel. This is not what anyone would like to have happen.”------------The private company Chartwell Real Estate owns the Colonel Belcher and is responsible for the decision to evict the veterans and seniors living in the designated assisted living wing of the facility. Chief Operating Officer Richard Noonan told Calgary Herald that his company intends to upgrade the soon to be vacated suites so they would be available to rent privately for more money.---------“The profitability of that community will probably improve after we make a significant investment and reposition the suites.” “We’ll be able to charge whatever the market can bear.”-------Don Garrow has suffered from Parkinson’s disease for the past three years and spends much of his time in a wheelchair. It is not clear if the eviction of veterans will affect him directly or not, but he is one of the 150 or so now living there with the uncertainty. The 29 who are officially getting the heave ho have been told in writing and have until September to find new lodgings. One of them is a 92-year old veteran of the Royal Canadian Air Force who just moved into the facility three months ago. He says he is “shocked,” but that others who have lived there since the Colonel Belcher Centre opened its doors in 2003 are in worse shock. Indeed, they are dumbfounded, scrambled. They are being forced to leave the security of a facility that is supposed to provide for their well being, a facility that has a mandate for assisting in their care and daily living.---

I am doing a series on residents in long term care who faced evicted.

The first story I come across involves a P3 partnership that resulted in havoc in the lives of the folks who lived in this place:

http://daveberta.ca/2011/07/gary-mars-unfortunate-timing-public-private-partnership-evicts-29-veterans-and-seniors/

gary mar’s unfortunate timing. public-private partnership evicts 29 veterans and seniors.

Charwell Colonel Belcher Eviction Notice
29 veterans and seniors are being evicted by Chartwell Real Estate.
Only days after it was revealed that 29 veterans and seniors are being evicted from thePublic-Private Partnership (P3) Seniors Residence at Colonel Belcher in Calgary, PC leadership candidate Gary Mar reaffirmed his support for more P3s in health care.
The private company Chartwell Real Estate owns the Colonel Belcher and is responsible for the decision to evict the veterans and seniors living in the designated assisted living wing of the facility. Chief Operating Officer Richard Noonan told Calgary Herald that his company intends to upgrade the soon to be vacated suites so they would be available to rent privately for more money.
“The profitability of that community will probably improve after we make a significant investment and reposition the suites.” “We’ll be able to charge whatever the market can bear.”
The Colonel Belcher was created in the early 2000s through a P3 financial arrangement between the private company Apex and Carewest (which was then a wholly owned subsidiary of the Calgary Health Authority, and now Alberta Health Services).
The provincial government donated 26 acres of land for the complex and the Calgary Health Authority committed $20 million in capital costs while Apex was their private partner. The facility was later sold to Chartwell Real Estate, which also inherited the sixty year lease of the land which the facility sits on. Mr. Mar was the Minister of Health & Wellness when the P3 funding arrangement Colonel Belcher P3 was being developed.
When asked about P3s and the Colonel Belcher, Dr. Tom Noseworthy, co-director of theCalgary Institute for Population and Public Healthtold the CBC that:
‘I have had experience with private-public partnerships. You get what you want now; you pay the price later’
Mr. Mar’s untimely position in favour of more private sector involvement in Alberta’s public health care system is reminiscent of a position taken by Wildrose leader Danielle Smith, who defended the privately-operated Health Resources Centre as it slid into bankruptcy in 2010.
Ms. Smith, who’s party recently reaffirmed their position in favour of increased private health care, was a strident defender of the flagship private surgical facility, which only survived as long as it did through generous public financial investments by the now-defunct Calgary Health Authority and its status as a preferred destination to send stable patients (leaving higher cost and less medically stable surgery patients in the public system).


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/eviction-of-seniors-draws-fire-at-for-profit-care-1.1029692

Eviction of seniors draws fire at for-profit care

CBC News Posted: Jul 06, 2011 3:36 PM MT Last Updated: Jul 06, 2011 3:32 PM MT
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Related Stories

The eviction of 30 seniors from their assisted-living homes in northwest Calgary is drawing more fire from critics who say it shows that private, for-profit businesses can't be relied on for publicly funded health-care services.
mi-belcher-residence-senior
The privately owned Colonel Belcher residence in northwest Calgary is evicting 30 seniors because it's in the company's 'best interest.' (CBC)
It emerged Tuesday that Chartwell Seniors Housing, which owns the 175-person Colonel Belcher seniors residence, will not be renewing its contract  to provide the accommodations, food and housekeeping for residents of the complex's assisted-living units.
The Mississauga, Ont.-based company had leased the space to publicly run Carewest, which operates 10 residential living facilities in Calgary, but opted not to extend the arrangement because "it wasn't in our best interest," senior vice-president of operations Donna Marasco said.
Tom Noseworthy, a physician and co-director of the Calgary Institute for Population and Public Health, said no one should be surprised that a private company wants to make a profit.
"Frankly, this is Chartwell making a business decision to move them out and replace them with more profitable individuals," he said. "So is that bad? Well, you know, that's business."
'I have had experience with private-public partnerships. You get what you want now; you pay the price later'
—Tom Noseworthy, health policy expert
When a public entity such as a government health-care body enters into a contract with a profit-making enterprise in what's called a public-private partnership, or P3, patient care may eventually take a back seat, Noseworthy said.
"I have had experience with private-public partnerships. They have their value, they have their down sides. You get what you want now; you pay the price later."
Wendy Armstrong, a past president of the Consumers' Association of Canada's Alberta chapter who has studied care for seniors, said for-profit companies don't do well providing not-for-profit services in the sector.
"Their main focus is really not on providing safe and affordable housing for seniors, and attended-care services should they require them," Armstrong said.
The situation at the Colonel Belcher complex suggests the province may need to reevaluate using P3s to provide care for seniors, she said.

'Calgary needs more beds'

Chartwell and Alberta Health Services have pledged to find the residents, who are in their 80s and 90s, new spaces in other assisted-living facilities, which provide support and care but not at the level of a full-fledged nursing home.
But such spaces are in short supply.
"Calgary needs more beds and needs them now. That is a challenge, but we are bringing on more capacity this fall," said Pam Brown, who's in charge of seniors health in Calgary for AHS.
"It's not easy, but we know what we're doing. We're looking and placing people every day based on care needs. We know what to do and we're doing it."
A provincial union leader said the bigger challenge is that as more baby-boomers retire and eventually move into care facilities, the increased demand will drive up the

**************************************************************************

So that was interesting.
The Tories donate the land for the P3 project.
The Calgary Health Authority provides $20 million in public funds.
Then the private company (Apex) provides private funds.
Apex sells out to Chartwell Real Estate.
This new private partner has lease rights of the land for 60 years.
They try to kick out the seniors to make more money.
What a scheme.
The media get the story of veterans and seniors kicked out because of the dumb privitization ideology of the Tories and BBQ the Gary Mar guy and the Danielle Wildrosie who are both P3 evangelists.
But what about the poor residents?
They evidently got the help of yapping from the veterans who yapped to the powers that be in government.
And the evictions never happened.
It is pretty amazing what the yapping of citizens can do for the eviction of seniors and veterans in this case.

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/media-ugc/items/2011-07-10-03-04-54-Disrespect%20for%20our%20Veterans.pdf

COLD BLOODED EVICTION OF SICK, AGED VETERANS FROM FACILITY IN CALGARY
All of the following is self explanatory. A very alarming story. A good example of the impact of Privatization.
Bill Devlin Secretary
RCEME West
Ladies and Gentlemen. Please share this shameful story with ALL of your Veterans Association members, as well as your Member of Parliament and Alberta MLA.
This is a disgraceful story of VETERANS EVICTION which must be brought to the attention of ANYONE WHO CAN HELP TO OVERTURN THIS DESPICABLE DISPLAY OF PROFIT OVER PATRIOTIC RESPECT FOR OUR VETERANS.
Respectfully.
L.(Tex)Leugner CD,WarrantOfficer (Ret'd), Alberta Regional Director, Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association. Cc: Koreavetnews@aol.com ; Maj Gen (ret) Lewis W. QOR - MacKENZIE, CM, OStJ, OOnt, MSC (2), CD, LLD (Hon) ; Harper.S@parl.gc.ca ; Prime Minister/Premier ministre ; Elizabeth.May@Parl.gc.ca
Subject: FW: COLD BLOODED EVICTION OF SICK, AGED VETERANS FROM FACILITY IN
CALGARY
Sir,

Don old friend, the KVA gave you an honourable mention in the article below. I am deeply saddened and utterly appalled at this money grubbing attempt to make profits from off of the backs of our bedridden disable aging veterans. This is a bloody shame, shame shame. Maybe the PM, as an Albertan MP can use his influence in Calgary to help right this terrible blatant wrong.
 Be well Sir- billy Canadian Soldier Poet
http://iwvpa.net/willbondwha/the-veterans-h.php
Vince, As a young soldier, I almost died from an infected swollen neck (tonsillitis over Christmas 1958) and spent two weeks in the Col Belcher before returning to Currie Barracks. It was a great hospital. There were many vets living there at that time including a couple of old lads from WW1. Money is the root of all evil and this is a perfect example. Scandalous, cold blooded eviction of sick, aged veterans from Colonel Belcher facility in CalgaryHis retirement home is in Calgary, located on 1945 Veterans Way NW. Sounds like a patriotic and fitting address for this Korean War Veteran, Don Garrow, who served in Korea with the Lord Strathcona’s Horse
(Royal Canadians). The name of his assisted living facility is equally patriotic and harks back to 1919. It is called the Colonel Belcher Centre, named after the now torn down Colonel Belcher Hospital that was once operated by Canada’s Department of Veterans Affairs.
The original “Belcher” treated veterans from the First World War and the newer hospital that was built in the 1940's treated hundreds and hundreds of wounded, injured and ill servicemen during the Second World War.
During the Korean War it treated injured soldiers from Currie Barracks, also now gone – soldiers from the Princess Patricia’s, troopers from the Strathcona’s.
Ownership of the Belcher transferred from the federal government to the Province of Alberta in 1979 and in 1991 it was designated as a long-term care facility for war veterans.
It was eventually replaced by a new facility, the Colonel Belcher Centre. The Alberta government was proud of the undertaking. It was a cooperative venture shared with private companies.
The trouble is, the Colonel Belcher Centre where our very sick comrade Don Garrow is quartered, this week announced that it was bouncing 29 veterans from their assisted living quarters. They are living in small apartments and the “partner” company that owns the building where the apartments are located wants to convert them for non-veteran use in order to score higher rent.
Spokesmen involved have brazenly said that whereas veterans housed there by authority of Veterans Affairs Canada pay only $1,700 monthly for those quarters, they can rent them to non-veteran seniors for $2,200 or more - whatever the market will bear!
Incredible, but that’s what veteran activist Rolly Soper ran into when he went to the Belcher to deliver a book to Comrade Garrow that was published by the Korean Government for Canadian veterans in long-term care facilities.
Don Garrow has suffered from Parkinson’s disease for the past three years and spends much of his time in a wheelchair. It is not clear if the eviction of veterans will affect him directly or not, but he is one of the 150 or so now living there with the uncertainty.
The 29 who are officially getting the heave ho have been told in writing and have until September to find new lodgings. One of them is a 92-year old veteran of the Royal Canadian Air Force who just moved into the facility three months ago.
He says he is “shocked,” but that others who have lived there since the Colonel Belcher Centre opened its doors in 2003 are in worse shock. Indeed, they are dumbfounded, scrambled. They are being forced to leave the security of a facility that is supposed to provide for their well being, a facility that has a mandate for assisting in their care and daily living.
Indeed, the Belcher Centre, which is privately owned but was built with provincial assistance, has bragged through the years about the wonderful treatment afforded its residents… the great assistance being given to Canada’s veterans, who truly deserve it, etc.
Their promotional literature on the Internet and in brochures ballyhoos the treatment, the pastimes, the personal care afforded the veterans.
Rolly is flabbergasted, and angry.One of the veterans who has received his formal notice and is being bounced is an 82-year old Korean War Veteran. His daughter is very upset, says that, “Change is traumatic when you’re his age.”
Yes, it surely is. More traumatic is their dread new understanding that they may be only objects of profit for the operators. For several years they were welcome to stay and pay the VAC subsidized residency rates.
And now the owners of the part of the facility where they reside see a way to hike their revenue – by
kicking them out! It is disgraceful and shocking and should be criminal that they can let these aged, very sick veterans down and shockingly turn them out onto the street.
That is what is happening in the fine city of Calgary in one of the wealthiest provinces in all of the world, one rich in petroleum and oil sands and cattle – and rich, too, in the tough, fair dealing, hard fighting, noble sons who fought Canada’s wars in their youth and to whom places like Calgary owe their everything.
Such shame!
Such scandal!
If Don Garrow should have to leave there for any reason, though he may not be directly affected by the eviction, how would he fare? Parkinson’s disease, wheelchair bound, reliant on visits from family and comrade veterans like Roly Soper?
How will those being bounced who have similar debilitating conditions get through this? How can they not worry themselves even sicker about their displacement?
Shame, Alberta, for letting this situation exist and come to pass, and a hundredfold more shame to the money hungry, insensitive, ungrateful business people who are bouncing the veterans to make a few more dollars.
We wonder what fellow veteran, the Honourable Donald S. Ethel, Lieutenant Governor of Alberta will say about this? Prior to being appointed to his high office, Don retired from the Canadian Forces as a colonel, after first joining up as a private. He held virtually every rank in the Canadian Forces and he is not bashful about speaking out.
The book that Roly Soper took to Don Garrow has a message in it from Korea’s Ministry of Patriots and Veterans Affairs. It assures him that “The People and Government of Korea hold you dear to their hearts.”
Too bad the same kind of love and respect is not as abundant to the people who are responsible for kicking veterans out of the Colonel Belcher Centre.
Calgary seniors home evicting 29 residentsBy Matt McClure, Calgary Herald July 4, 201
Colleen De Neve, Calgary Herald - Len Lomore, a 92-year-old war veteran, moved into the assisted living wing at Carewest Colonel Belcher just three months ago. He will need to relocate by the end of
September as the owner of the facility has decided to rent the beds out privately in order to improve
profitability.
Photograph by: Colleen De Neve, Calgary Herald
Dozens of elderly and ailing residents at a Calgary facility face eviction after the province’s health authority and the private owner failed to agree on a lease renewal.
As Alberta Health Services faces a province wide backlog of more than 1,500 people waiting for a continuing care space, officials admitted Monday they’re now scrambling to find new homes by the end of September for 29 seniors in the assisted living wing at Carewest Colonel Belcher.
“This is unfortunate,” said Pam Brown, the authority’s executive director for integrated seniors health in Calgary.
“We do feel a lot of concern and empathy for how these residents and their families feel. This is not what anyone would like to have happen.”
Three months ago, Len Lomore sold his condominium and moved into the facility after a worsening knee condition made it difficult for him to cook and care for himself. Now, the 92-year-old war veteran is being uprooted again.
“I can’t tell you how disappointed I’m feeling,” he said.
“I worry all night and day now about where I’ll end up going and whether the care will be as good.”
While AHS’s three-year lease with Chartwell Seniors Housing REIT expired in January, the publicly traded company didn’t give the authority’s subsidiary Carewest official notice to vacate the premises until about two weeks ago.
“We were negotiating in good faith,” Brown said.
“There had been no indication they would not be renewing as they had done previously.”Opened in 2003 amid much fanfare as a model of public-private partnership, the 30 assisted-living beds are part
of a larger facility that includes 145 seniors suites rented privately by Chartwell and 175 nursing-home beds operated by Carewest.
Richard Noonan, Chartwell’s chief operating officer, said the company now plans to upgrade the assisted living beds and rent them privately to capitalize on the growing market in Calgary for retirement living.
“The profitability of that community will probably improve after we make a significant investment and reposition the suites,” Noonan said.
“We’ll be able to charge whatever the market can bear,”
With more than 24,000 suites and rooms at more than 200 locations around North America, Chartwell bills itself as one of the continent’s largest companies in the seniors’ housing sector.
While Noonan refused to reveal details of the lease discussions with AHS, he indicated the company wasn’t comfortable with continuing with the arrangement whereby Carewest workers provided nursing and care services to residents.
“We prefer wherever possible that our employees provide care services, meals, programming rather than a third-party provider,” Noonan said.
An AHS spokesman said the 17 employees affected would be given other work opportunities with Carewest.
The authority plans to add another 1,100 continuing-care spaces across Alberta by next March, including 400 beds in and around Calgary.
While none of that new capacity is set to open until this fall, Brown said she is confident that suitable
accommodations for the displaced seniors can be found at existing facilities.
In his tiny studio room, Lomore watched a baseball game on television Monday, trying to distract himself from worries about where he’ll end up. Much of his pension is eaten up paying for his wife’s care at a nearby nursing home, so coughing up more to stay put at Colonel Belcher isn’t an option.
“The staff here is very friendly and very kind,” he said. “I’m shocked, but the other guys who’ve lived here for eight years now are really upset.”
His son, Dennis Lomore, said he doesn’t understand why AHS and Carewest had no idea the lease wouldn’t be renewed when they moved his father into the facility.
“I can’t believe they didn’t know this was going to happen.” he said.
“It’s typical of either their absence of planning or their integrity.”


http://www.kvacanada.com/newsletterpdf/july172011newsletter.pdf
The Korean War Veteran
Internet Journal - July 17, 2011



Flash
Veterans at Colonel Belcher Centre in Calgary
will not be evicted
A couple of weeks ago the Korean War Veteran reported that 30
disabled veterans in the Colonel Belcher Centre in Calgary were facing
eviction because the owner of a contiguous retirement facility would not
renew its lease for the operators of the centre.
While other media reported on it, the Korean War Veteran publication
was forwarded to official sources by many veterans along with
statements of protest, asking for help and intervention. Such messages
were sent to the Lieutenant Governor of Alberta, Veterans Affairs
Canada (VAC), the Prime Minister's Office (PMO) and other offices of
influence.
VAC had immediately assigned a field manager to the situation in
Calgary and was seeking to relocate the veterans to other facilities.
VAC, the operators of the Colonel Belcher Centre and the affected
veterans - all in their '80's or '90's - were between a very hard rock and a
very hard place.
To relocate veterans who have resigned themselves to live out their life
beside comrades in a place where they receive compassion, and where
they also receive appropriate VAC-authorized treatment, would indeed
be upsetting, especially to the frail who are each hour and day fighting
despondency and physical ailments.It is noted that VAC's standard of care exceeds that available at manyrest homes and senior citizen residences. For instance, in order for the
Veterans to stay in the wing they were being evicted from, the owner of
that facility had to agree to let the Belcher Centre's staff care for
the Veterans and provide the VAC required level of personal care.
This information and the news clipping from the Calgary Herald was
provided by Veteran Roly Soper, a member of the national executive of
the Korea Veterans Association of Canada..






http://calgary.ctvnews.ca/seniors-staying-put-1.670514

Seniors staying put


ctvcalgary.ca
Published Friday, July 15, 2011 3:02PM MDT 
Alberta Health Services and the company that leases rooms at a local care centre have reached a new agreement and now several seniors who were facing eviction will get to stay on at the facility.
AHS and Chartwell Seniors Housing REIT negotiated a contract to ensure Designated Assisted Living (DAL) services continue at the Chartwell Seniors Residence on the Carewest Colonel Belcher Care Centre site.
Earlier this month, 29 seniors were sent a letter informing them that the lease would not be renewed and they would need to make alternative living arrangements.
The new deal is for three years and is retroactive to February 1, 2011.
"We are very pleased for the residents," says Pam Brown, Executive Director of Integrated Seniors Health, Calgary Zone. "Residents are our priority and reaching this agreement with Chartwell allows us to continue to provide a vital service for them at the Colonel Belcher site."
The move is welcome news for the residents who would have had to move by September 2011.
The AHS says there are upwards of 100 seniors on a waiting list for assisted living services and that 366 new beds will open in the city by the end of this year.


***********************************

This is so pathetic.
We provide the land and monies and we are "allowed to use the property".
What the heck?
We are renters of what could have been our own property.


Well they seem to still be a long term care place.

I wonder who owns it now?
The same company seems to own it but have made it into high end retirement property that will profit them in a major way.
Wow.

http://chartwell.com/retirement-homes/chartwell-colonel-belcher-retirement-residence

Chartwell Colonel Belcher Retirement Residence

1945 Veteran's Way NW, Calgary, Alberta T3B 5Y7

“An independent residence for active seniors”

Chartwell Colonel Belcher Retirement Residence is conveniently located near downtown Calgary, Foothills Hospital, shopping and public transportation, and is attached to a long term care centre. An independent retirement home, Colonel Belcher offers an extensive life enrichment program, and the sounds of lively chatter and laughter are often heard throughout the residence. Amenities include a library, craft room, games room, exercise room, family dining room, theatre and pub. During the summer months, residents enjoy the pleasures of our gardens, mini-golf course and walking paths. Colonel Belcher’s long service, dedicated staff encourage a welcoming atmosphere and provide a sense of security, freeing residents from worry and allowing them to simply enjoy retirement living.
 Download Property Brochure   



So why is the AHS folks involved in this private business financed through us?
Does AHS funnel the people into both the private as well as the public places?

They have this place listed as a Carewest Colonel Belcher place.

What is this all about?
Carewest was owned by the Calgary Health Authority that is now AHS.
So who owns Carewest now? Is it AHS?  Looks like it is owned by AHS still.
This AHS company owns a whole group of retirement places:

https://carewestwebsite.wordpress.com/

As Calgary’s largest public care provider of its kind and one of the largest in Canada, Carewest operates 12 locations aimed at helping people live more independent lives. Our spectrum of care is available to adults of all ages and includes long-term care, rehabilitation and recovery services, and community programs and services. We pride ourselves on our ability to change with the community’s needs and we do our best to predict what those needs may be in the future. Innovative thinking brought us here – imagine where it can take us.

https://carewestwebsite.wordpress.com/rates-and-standards/

Rates and Standards

Accommodation rates in long-term care centres are regulated by the Alberta government and standardized across the province, which means you pay the same rate at every care centre, whether it’s public or private.
Effective July 1, 2014, the fees for continuing care in Alberta are:
  • $52.30 per day for a semi-private room
  • $60.45 per day for a private room
(All rates subject to change)
Your accommodation fees pay for:
  • Room
  • Building maintenance / operations
  • Food services
  • Housekeeping services
  • Administration
  • General facility upkeep
  • Building insurance

Care Funding

Alberta Health Services, through funds provided by the provincial government, is responsible for funding health care. You do not pay for care. Care includes:
  • Nursing Services
    • Registered Nurses (RNs)
    • Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs)
    • Health Care Aides (HCAs)
  • Social Workers
  • Therapy Services
  • Registered Dietitians
  • Pharmacy services, including medications
    • Medical supplies
    • Health equipments
    • Personal care service
    For more information about accommodation fees, please read the visit the Government of Alberta website, explaining these charges.
    Financial assistance for eligible residents is available through Alberta Seniors. For more information on financial assistance, policy and planning, and housing support programs, please visit Alberta Seniors and Community Supports at http://www.seniors.gov.ab.ca/ or call 1-800-642-3853 (in Alberta)

    Admission

    If you would like to know if you are eligible for admission to a Carewest long-term care centre or any other program offered by Carewest, please call the Alberta Health Services’ Community Care Access at 943-1920. A Transition Coordinator will assess your needs and may send someone out to your home to conduct a further assessment of those needs. Please visit How to Access for more Carewest program information.

    Long-term Care Standards



Who owns Carewest now?

So from the following chatter on the AHS website ---I find out that Carewest is still owned by AHS.


http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/about.asp

Who We Are
  • We are the skilled and dedicated health professionals, support staff, volunteers and physicians who promote wellness and provide health care every day to about 4 million Albertans, as well as to many residents of Saskatchewan, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories.
  • Alberta Health Services (AHS) has over 104,000 employees, including about 96,100 direct AHS employees and almost 8,000 staff working in AHS wholly-owned subsidiaries such as Carewest, CapitalCare Group and Calgary Laboratory Services (excluding Covenant Health staff), 17,600 volunteers and almost 8,400 physicians.
  • Students from Alberta’s universities and colleges, as well as from universities and colleges outside of Alberta, receive clinical education in AHS facilities.
  • 100 acute care hospitals, 5 stand-alone psychiatric facilities, 8,230 acute care beds, 22,533 continuing care beds/spaces and 202 community palliative and hospice beds, 2,327 addiction and mental health beds plus equity partnership in 41 primary care networks.
  • Programs and services are offered at over 450 facilities throughout the province, including hospitals, clinics, continuing care facilities, mental health facilities and community health sites.
  • The province also has an extensive network of community-based services designed to assist Albertans maintain and/or improve health status.
Our History
  • Canada’s first province-wide, fully integrated health system, announced on May 15, 2008, by Ron Liepert, Minister of Health and Wellness.
  • We bring together 12 formerly separate health entities in the province including three geographically based health authorities, Alberta Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission (AADAC), Alberta Mental Health Board and Alberta Cancer Board. Ground ambulance service was added to the responsibilities of AHS in an announcement from Alberta Health and Wellness on May 30, 2008. The services were moved from municipalities to AHS effective April 1, 2009.
Our Leadership


I am still puzzled.
Why go the P3 route?
Why not own the entire property all along?
It is dumb in my mind.
There must be a ton of profit for the private sector partner --Chartwell Seniors Housing REIT----and so why not get the profit for the public?

Why is the AHS folks involved in this private business financed through us?
Does AHS funnel the people into this place?
I am confused.

They have a private company---Chartwell Colonel Belcher Retirement Residence--that is owned by ---Chartwell Seniors Housing REIT----that is attached to the long term care centre which is probably the AHS owned Carewest Colonel Belcher.


So odd.
Why do this sort of junk where vulnerable citizens and seniors are involved?
Long term care in my mind should not be in the hands of the private sector--but in public hands.
Both the private sector forms of long term care--non-profits and the for-profits can't get this business done accurately and the entire business should be in public hands.

What was the benefit of the P3 business in this case?
Zilch.
And who gets the profits?
It sure ain't us.
It seems to be an untidy way to do long term care.
And it almost resulted in the evictions of vulnerable Albertans.



http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/services.asp?pid=saf&rid=1050860

Continuing Care Services - Carewest Colonel Belcher

Provides long-term residential care, including:
  • nursing and personal care
  • physical, occupational or recreational therapy
  • pharmacy services

Address

Carewest Colonel Belcher
1939 Veterans Way NW
Calgary, Alberta
T3B 5Y8

Telephone

403-943-1920 (Placement - Community Care Access), 403-944-7800

Wheelchair accessible

For more information please contact the service at this facility.

Hours of Operation

24 hour service

Fees

Accommodation fees are charged as well as additional fees for personal laundry, hairdressing, telephone and cable.

Service language options

Tele-Interpreter / Language Lines

but to you

when you are given the runaround
stop the route you have taken
and begin again

when you are told nothing
and are humiliated as someone
who is to be denied    work harder to overcome these events 

when you are lost
in the maze of their design
refuse to stop the work of investigation

when you are marginalized
and given the stories of moving forward 
look at them calmly and refuse to budge from your position

this is your sister
when they stall for years
on the answers to the complaints that you have made

go up the ladder of the system of complaints 
follow the money and the claims of long term care organizations
this is how to play their games

when you are told nothing
about the complaints you have made to them
when the complaints go missing in action

it is time to begin again
repeat the same complaints
for years      until you get the answers to your questions

refuse to give up or give in
the story is all about denial
and failures      they tell you think of her best interests

as they sweep the broken crockery
from the accident of her care    into the dustbin
as they continue the fiction of long term care

 that is all about money
and profits       you must understand
the executives and administrators have their goals and ambitions

they have their jobs to do
and you are in their way
the story of your sister is minor to them

but to you
the story has a beginning and an ending that is near
I want the middle section that will make it all clear


and begin all over

walk forward
and then turn back
walk to the place you started the journey 
and begin all over

the story is always about reversals
and then you sit in the temper of the hour
and you leap forward
the situation is interesting

I become detached
I watch the flies roam
I study the accident
and what was left


walk forward
and then turn back
walk to the place you started the journey
and begin all over

except this time around
you know the rules and regulations
you have cast a wide net
now you narrow it

the pool is filled with piranhas
you put your boat there
and you row
to the place where you must go


what was is not gone
and now you must decide
the width of the story
you shape inside your head

this is a movie now
the frames are all askew
but you are patient
you take years to make a plot

walk forward
and then turn back
walk to the place you started the journey
and begin all over

in blog posts over years

put down the hours of my sister's life
and wrote out the complaints
that were never answered
understood then
that AHS has no power
to do the enforcement
of the non-compliance
of long term care facilities
we are engaged
in long term debates
about errors

put down the hours of my sister's life
so as the story develops
you will see the players
and their insistence
on the importance of the patient
as they fail her
they say the good words
of do no harm
as they neglect her
and ignore the advocate sister
they tell this advocate sister nothing


put down the hours of my sister's life
so that everyone would know
this is how will you will be treated
when the caregivers fail their work
and the administrators ignore the problems
the high end staff are all about blank faces
and the refusal to answer the questions
that I persist in asking of them
this is the story of my sister's life
that all Albertans will hear
in blog posts over years


Quotes from Amy Cuddy Don't fake it till you make it. Fake it till you become it. 21:02


http://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are

Filmed June 2012 at TEDGlobal 2012

Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are

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Amy Cuddy’s research on body language reveals that we can change other people’s perceptions — and even our own body chemistry — simply by changing body positions.

Why you should listen

Amy Cuddy wasn’t supposed to become a successful scientist. In fact, she wasn’t even supposed to finish her undergraduate degree. Early in her college career, Cuddy suffered a severe head injury in a car accident, and doctors said she would struggle to fully regain her mental capacity and finish her undergraduate degree.
But she proved them wrong. Today, Cuddy is a professor and researcher at Harvard Business School, where she studies how nonverbal behavior and snap judgments affect people from the classroom to the boardroom. And her training as a classical dancer (another skill she regained after her injury) is evident in her fascinating work on "power posing" -- how your body position influences others and even your own brain.

What others say

“Using a few simple tweaks to body language, Harvard researcher Amy Cuddy discovers ways to help people become more powerful.” — TIME Game Changers, March 19, 2012

Amy Cuddy’s TED talk

Amy Cuddy on the TED Blog
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Quotes from Amy Cuddy

Our bodies change our minds, and our minds can change our behavior, and our behavior can change our outcomes.
Amy Cuddy
TEDGlobal 2012 • 23M views • Oct 2012
Inspiring, Fascinating
When we think of nonverbals, we think of how we judge others. … We tend to forget, though, the other audience that's influenced by our nonverbals: ourselves.
Amy Cuddy
TEDGlobal 2012 • 23M views • Oct 2012
Inspiring, FascinatingBody language affects how others see us, but it may also change how we see ourselves. Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how “power posing” — standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success.