Tuesday, December 31, 2013

starry night

starry night
with the pale moon
in the background

and the withered dirt
wrapped in tender stems
and mottled leaves


what you fear
is within
overcome this 

and the rooted body
may wither
but the starry expanse endures

http://ronaldhanko-orchidhunter.blogspot.ca/2013/04/spring-wildflowers-at-washington-park.html

when the messenger comes

when the messenger comes
will we decipher
his symbols
to find
the end
of our universe?

when he writes on a leaf
the last canon
will the verse
be left undiscovered
by us
because we no longer bother to look?

a stray parade of lines
and the husk of a signal
on the passing leaves of trees
the wrong turn
and the end of the dream
written as florid warning

archaic language
printed on the very cells
left on the world's lungs
to say the living remarks
of the foreign god
who was the messenger   the alpha and the omega 



http://ronaldhanko-orchidhunter.blogspot.ca/2013/04/spring-wildflowers-at-washington-park.html

stay at home mummy writers

Writing doesn't take any special talent but it requires a great deal of stubborn persistence. It may be that you won't become a good writer but it is a great deal of fun learning to put words together. Also the prerequisites of writing--the reading--will keep you occupied for most of your life when you aren't otherwise busy writing.
Most of us are looking for some form of return for our labor that isn't just about money and power (at least I think we are). I suppose we are looking for a way to get pleasure out of production of something--a piece of art.
Most of us will never work for the length of time required to produce art but we can write millions of pieces (short and zigzagging) on a  blog and put the lines out for consumption.
Even if the things you write never get read--why not still write?
There are millions of books everywhere and fewer and fewer readers and yet this failure in connection between writer and reader hasn't slowed the ocean of books.

It is best to simply start.
You can tell yourself that you will write for a year or two and see how it goes.
After the first year or two, you will either keep writing or you will stop.
It is often the most persistent folks rather than the most talented folks who keep writing.
I am fairly persistent and I will get things written.
I don't see why you can't do the same sort of thing.
I mean if you want to write--why don't you begin?
You can write in any ten minute period of time between washing the babies' nappies or cleaning the fridge or ignoring the cooking.
The very fact that you are a stay at home mummy makes you ideal material to become a writer.
If you want to go to the suffering route, go beyond writing to poetry.
The poems you write will hurt people in their innocent ugliness but there you go.
You will be happy because these ugly mutants in language will be your own darlings and damn the eyes of everyone else for not seeing their beauty.
Another deviation from the regular route is to do the investigation of powerful people who don't want you nosing around their messes. This means you will be unpopular but don't let this dissuade you from investigating the folks in government. It is good for government to have citizens question the way the money is spent and then to write about financial disasters that the government and the auditors never told us about.  Then you need to fire these folks.

Writing is a way to becoming more than the selfish, hard self.
It is  a way to expand out of the nucleus and cytoplasm of a single cell to the others in the world.
It is enlightening for you to find out you aren't the only one with problems and it helps to find out that others are somewhat terrified of speaking out --because speaking out is hard.
It is also hard to write at times because you become sad about the horrors that other folks have had to endure because of stupidity.
I mean most of the messes I have investigated seem to be all about stupidity.

But there you go.
Writing is a way to go beyond the superficial Synergy spin of the world and into the rotten core.
If you don't want to go there, then don't write.
Make babies and wash their nappies.
But if you want more than this, do the work of changing yourself first and then go write up a storm.
Begin.
You can always change your mind.
But I doubt that you will.


10,000 posts

I have tried to reach 10,000 posts this year and haven't quite got there.
I am tuckered out writing day and night.
My fingers feel as if they are arthritic.
My family no longer knows me.
And I am fat.
Eating fruitcake day and night to keep up my spirits is not a good way to get the writing of 10,000 posts done.

Eventually I will get through 10,000 posts and I will write another 10,000 posts.
I hope to keep writing about the sad state of democracy in Canada and most especially in Alberta where we have been corrupted by bitumen and the bitumen gold rush that happens periodically in the boom cycles that we get due to bad governance.
Ultimately no matter who we hire--there is a tendency for them to become CAPP parties.
It is a sad matter that will only be relieved in my mind by ensuring we have minority governments whose power will be regulated by the opposition.
This will force everyone to work together.
With minority governments, there is corruption still but usually this is only if all the political parties are corrupted by the same issues which is rare.

I have no faith in any of the political parties.
But I do have faith in the ordinary Canadian who is interested in democracy.
Most of us are too busy or too intimidated to get accountability from government.

I suggest you all start doing tiny jabs at the business and get to know the political players on the various stages doing their four year theatrical acts.
You don't need to be a very bright person.
You just need to be absolutely determined to get answers to questions you ask.
If you can't get it out of the mouth that never opens in Alberta, simply become a citizen investigative journalist.
You  can do this in your spare time as Elizabeth May has encouraged us to do in her excellent and hopeful book--"How to Save the World in Your Spare Time".

My younger sister gave it to me to read and I haven't looked back since then.
Elizabeth May made it seem possible for a harried stay at home mummy beset with sick family members to do something--anything to alter the horrid state of deMockracy in Edmonton, in Alberta and in Canada.

This book helps you to find a way into the good work of citizen participation and engagement that no amount of Synergy spin, doctored reports, focus groups of already decided upon results or Katz arena type publicity presentations will provide.

You learn as you go along.
You help other activists.
You become more than you were at the beginning of the work.
Each mummy working on each project is yet another voice in the wilderness that is Alberta.
Each voice is needed.

Speak up!
Speak louder!
Change your city, change your province, change your nation.

If only a few mummies join together to become citizen investigative journalists think how much transparency and accountability there would be in Edmonton, in Alberta and in Canada.

We are required to do this work, because we are citizens of a so called democracy.
We are to work hard to do this work.
The work of democracy is work--as Elizabeth May has indicated.
It can be work that is all consuming.
But it is work that all of us must do or continue to stagnate in a corrupted democracy.
Will you begin?
Start by buying Elizabeth May's book.


http://www.amazon.ca/Save-World-Your-Spare-Time/dp/1552637816

How to Save the World in Your Spare Time [Paperback]

Elizabeth E May 
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)



---------densa44 -------- A long long time This has been going on for at least 40 years that I know of and long before that I'm told. This system is not working for the aboriginal people. it is long over due for a new look. IMO they have to find ways to deal with this themselves, the rest of us can help but not take over the raising of their children, and the only reason I have is because it doesn't work. A man I admire a great deal from the Tuus Tina near Calgary was a foster parent had only 2 rules (Moses had 10) 1. Don't drink in my house, and 2. You've got to get up in the morning. Working on this problem would accomplish much more than hunger strikes. For all sides.----------------------rwm1273 I have a friend who's ex is a foster mother. She has been married 3 times, and all of her kids moved out of her house, or she lost custody of her kids due to her behavior, yet she still gets foster kids. She is dysfunctional, yet our government trusts her to raise our most fragile children. Ones who have come from bad homes, and need a person with standards, morals, and common sense to help these children. I also know another couple who wanted to foster children once their own children moved away and had families of their own. This couple were semi retired, and owned a small acreage. After going through the initial checks, and training, they were turned down, because she had recently recovered from cancer. However the ones who were permitted to foster children were mostly single mothers. How can you raise difficult children, or give a proper home to youth who have come from dysfunctional homes when you can't even keep your own marriage together, or even keep custody of your own children? Our foster system is broken, just like many of our other systems that were designed to protect people. And many of the social service agents are criminals. Ready to step into good homes and remove children from good parents based on the most trivial of complaints, yet often they ignore the homes where there truly is a need for them to get involved.

you are only one mother
but you are dismayed

and how are you to do the work of change?

change yourself first
so that you understand history

begin by reading everything

and from there think about what
you have read

ask good questions and get the answers

you must get from the government
(because they are your hires

and they must respond to the questions of citizens)

and if you are afraid
remember this

you are just one but there are other mothers

join with another mother
and tell the people of Alberta

what has been done to the children

the ordinary people of Alberta
will listen to the mothers

because we all belong to families

they will wonder what went wrong
with the work of the Tories    so that they kept silent

from 1999 about  145 dead children

and what will we hear about next?
the children who were left to die 

without any intervention at all



http://www.albertaprimetime.com/Stories.aspx?pd=5889

Fatal Care series

Original Air Date: Friday, November 29, 2013
The “Fatal Care” series brought about some tragic and shocking revelations, and the response that followed was extraordinary. Now we take a closer look at the story and its impact with Darcy Henton, from the Calgary Herald.


http://www.outdoorsmenforum.ca/showthread.php?t=200068

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  #1  
Unread 11-25-2013, 06:17 PM
Join Date: Jan 2011
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Default Fatal Care?

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...are/index.html
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  #2  
Unread 11-25-2013, 06:44 PM
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Thanks for posting. A sorry state of affairs.
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  #3  
Unread 11-25-2013, 06:57 PM
Join Date: Dec 2010
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It's kind of hard to image how brutal it can be for some kids.
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  #4  
Unread 11-26-2013, 09:50 AM
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I have a friend who's ex is a foster mother. She has been married 3 times, and all of her kids moved out of her house, or she lost custody of her kids due to her behavior, yet she still gets foster kids. She is dysfunctional, yet our government trusts her to raise our most fragile children. Ones who have come from bad homes, and need a person with standards, morals, and common sense to help these children.

I also know another couple who wanted to foster children once their own children moved away and had families of their own. This couple were semi retired, and owned a small acreage. After going through the initial checks, and training, they were turned down, because she had recently recovered from cancer. However the ones who were permitted to foster children were mostly single mothers.

How can you raise difficult children, or give a proper home to youth who have come from dysfunctional homes when you can't even keep your own marriage together, or even keep custody of your own children?

Our foster system is broken, just like many of our other systems that were designed to protect people. And many of the social service agents are criminals. Ready to step into good homes and remove children from good parents based on the most trivial of complaints, yet often they ignore the homes where there truly is a need for them to get involved.
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  #5  
Unread 11-26-2013, 11:02 AM
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Pretty sad, hard to imagine in a country like ours there still stuff like this going on.
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  #6  
Unread 11-26-2013, 02:58 PM
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Posts: 3,126
Default A long long time

This has been going on for at least 40 years that I know of and long before that I'm told.

This system is not working for the aboriginal people. it is long over due for a new look. IMO they have to find ways to deal with this themselves, the rest of us can help but not take over the raising of their children, and the only reason I have is because it doesn't work.

A man I admire a great deal from the Tuus Tina near Calgary was a foster parent had only 2 rules (Moses had 10) 1. Don't drink in my house, and 2. You've got to get up in the morning.

Working on this problem would accomplish much more than hunger strikes. For all sides.
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  #7  
Unread 11-26-2013, 04:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warbridle View Post
It's quite the story ... very eye-opening! Few know much about it until now.

The Calgary Herald is running the same six-part series this week.


Mac
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Because you burnt our land and killed my children---------The protest itself is like most I’ve seen – a peaceful march to the wall, some singing and waving of flags, and a few dozen meters away, some shabab (youths) throwing stones at soldiers on the other side of the road. The army sprays the infamous putrid ‘skunk’ liquid across the wall in the general direction of the protesters. Further east, on a tiny ramp beyond the wall, a group of ultra-Orthodox teenagers gather to watch the action. This has also become a kind of ritual.-------------

I came upon the words of this mother in a video about the death of her son killed by Israeli soldiers throwing tear gas canisters at protesters.


you killed my children
but I did not destroy the other
instead I planted a flower
and a tree to remember them
and I asked my god for some courage


you killed my children
but I did not become a victim
instead I planted a flower
and made a village of mothers
who came together to change the world

you killed my children
but I did not stay silent
instead I planted a flower
and asked my god to give me the courage
to speak    so that the other children of other mothers might live

you killed my children
but although I was broken I did not stay this way
instead I planted a flower
and I asked the people of the world
to bear witness to my agony which I have converted to my own form of justice

my heart will always be scarred   Sabhiha Abu Rahmah

*****************************************************************

Having lived in the Middle East as a child I was used to the regular ricochet of rhetoric and bullets in the area about Kuwait.
Oil and its associated problems are found all over the Earth.
Add to this the horror of the Jewish genocide and now the Palestinian genocide and we have an almost endless war that continues because people are stupid.

 You would have thought that people who have been murdered for being Jewish would not do the same thing to other people but here is the usual case of the transgressed against protecting themselves by transgressing against others.

If we ignore religion, money, culture, oil, power struggles and these dividing issues and look at the killing of Palestinians for one single moment-- in terms  of a mother losing her child you can see that there is no justification for this sort of ongoing genocide of a people.

If the Jewish people of Israel were held accountable by the world community including Canada and the Harper crew that panders to them because they obviously have their corporate donors among powerful rich Jewish Canadians --then this sort of horror would end pronto.

But because--in my mind--Israel is getting a free pass to bully neighboring communities--we have this story over and over again--which is ultimately the story of injustice.  I hate injustice. The fact is we are all part of this problem. By keeping silent about the problem, we hope it will eventually solve itself.  I don't believe this problem will solve itself. This problem of injustice requires all the people of the world to yap about it and face the facts that prejudice, selfishness, greed and a desire for protection over brains infests all of us.

We need to solve problems and not kill human beings.

Here is one mother's story.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2013/dec/30/palestinian-garden-israeli-teargas-canisters-video
Every Friday for the last eight years, residents of Bil'in in the West Bank protest against Israeli settlements on the Palestinian villagers' land. In April 2009 one protester, Bassem Ibrahim Abu Rahmah, was killed by a teargas grenade. He is remembered in Bil'in by a garden of flowers planted in used teargas canisters thrown at demonstrators by Israeli soldiers
My heart will always be scarred.


http://972mag.com/photos-what-the-press-missed-in-bilin-tear-gas-flower-garden/80129/


 

PHOTOS: What the press missed in Bil'in tear gas flower garden


A garden of flowers planted in used tear gas grenades memorializes Bassem Abu Rahmah, killed by Israeli forces in 2009 in Bil’in. But recent AP photo coverage looks mostly at the flowers and misses the memorial.
Text by Elias Nawawieh
Photos by Activestills.org

Before a weekly demonstration against the wall, a Palestinian child visits the memorial garden planted on the spot where Bassem Abu Rahmah, in a 2009 protest, was shot and killed with a high-velocity tear gas grenade fired by Israeli soldiers, Bil’in, West Bank, October 4, 2013. The garden’s flowers are planted in used tear gas grenades thrown by Israeli forces in clashes with Palestinians during the weekly protest. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)
The act is one of both peaceful resistance and an answer to the separation wall erected by the State of Israel. Residents of the village of Bil’in have created an oasis in the arid landscape of the West Bank, and sown flowers in tear gas canisters which were fired at protesters by Israeli forces. Bassem Abu Rahmah, a protest leader, was killed in 2009 when Israeli forces shot him in the chest with a tear gas grenade. The garden is to commemorate him and other victims in the Palestinians’ fight for their land.

Flowers grow in used tear gas canisters on the sport where Bassem Abu Rahmah was shot and killed with a tear gas grenade fired by Israeli soldiers during a protest against the wall on 2009, in West Bank village of Bil’in, October 4, 2013. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)
However, that key context of the garden was missing from the photos in a widely circulated Associated Press photo story. None of the AP photos included the centerpiece of the memorial garden, a translucent photo of Bassem mounted on a frame of spent tear gas shell casings. Moreover, photo captions identified only “A Palestinian woman” watering the garden, failing to mention that it was Sabiha Abu Rahmah, Bassem’s mother.

Before a weekly demonstration against the wall, Sabiha Abu Rahmah weeps at the memorial garden planted on the spot where her son, Bassem, in a 2009 protest, was shot and killed with a high-velocity tear gas grenade fired by Israeli soldiers, Bil’in, West Bank, October 4, 2013.
An AP article text that accompanied the photos on many news sites did mention Bassem’s death and that of his sister Jawaher, who is believed to have died because of tear gas inhalation in 2011. But some publications, such as the UK’s Daily Mail, did not include the AP text, instead running a staff writer’s summary of Israel’s word against “critics” regarding the separation wall.
On Ynet‘s version, not only is there no mention of the Abu Rahmah deaths as the reason for the memorial garden, but their concluding sentence further obfuscates the price of Bilin’s resistance: “Every Friday, Palestinian and Israeli leftist activists come to protest the separation fence at the site, and several of these demonstrations have ended in injuries.” Who injures whom and how badly is left to the reader’s imagination.

A Palestinian man waters flowers planted in used tear gas grenades on the sport where Israeli soldiers shot and killed Bassem Abu Rahmah with a tear gas grenade to the chest during a protest against the wall on 2009, in West Bank village of Bil’in, October 4, 2013. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)
In addition to memorializing the Abu Rahma family’s losses, the eclectic potted plants also mark land that Palestine was able to reclaim two years ago through a protracted court battle that finally re-routed Israel’s wall.
Residents of Bilin say 60 percent of their farmland was cut off by the Israeli separation wall. Since 2005, villagers have been going out almost every Friday for anti-wall protests, which often result in violent crackdowns by Israeli forces. Bilin has become a symbol of Palestinian protests against Israeli policies in the West Bank, and the village’s struggle to regain its land became the subject of a 2012 Oscar-nominated documentary Five Broken Cameras.

A flower growing from a tear gas grenade hangs from razor wire near a memorial garden on the spot where, in a 2009 demonstration in the West Bank village of Bil’in, Bassem Abu Rahmah was shot and killed with a high-velocity tear gas grenade fired by Israeli soldiers, Bil’in, West Bank, October 4, 2013. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)
Since the Israeli regime began building the separation wall in 2002, the route has been the target of regular protests waged by residents of various towns whose land is threatened by or has already been cut off by the barrier. What many outside the Palestinian community misunderstand is how the Israeli government has effectively confiscated large plots of Palestinian land in order to erect the barrier. When the 435-mile barrier is complete, 85 percent of it will have been built inside the West Bank, rather than on the internationally recognized Green Line between the State of Israel and the occupied Palestinian territories. The result is that the wall does not simply divide “Israel from the West Bank” as is often stated, but rather Palestinian land from Palestinian land, dividing farmers from their land, children from schools, and families from each other.



*******************************************

http://972mag.com/facts-on-the-ground-loom-over-bilin-as-protests-enter-ninth-year/68404/


 

'Facts on the ground' loom over Bil'in as protests enter ninth year


I went to the weekly demo against the Wall in the Palestinian village Bil’in yesterday, after several months that I haven’t visited the West Bank at all (I try not to travel beyond the Green Line when it’s not for work). A colleague visiting from the U.S. joined me, and we arrived at the village shortly after noon.
Some internationals and a few Israelis gathered in the streets, and when the prayer ended we started walking towards the wall, a march which has become much longer since the army moved the route of the barrier closer to the ultra-Orthodox settlement Modi’in Ilit – the largest city in the West Bank – and returned the village some of its land. Beyond the wall lies “Green Park,” one of the two eastern neighbourhoods of Modi’in Ilit, also on farm land that belonged to Bil’in before it was confiscated by Israel in order to solve the housing crisis for the ultra-Orthodox population of Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.
Even if Israel were to agree to leave the West Bank, Green Park would not be evacuated. Even Palestinian negotiators agreed to have it annexed to Israel in exchange for equal territory elsewhere. Thus, the Palestinian people might one day be compensated for the land that was taken from Bil’in, but the people of the village – its owners – will not. This fact also highlights the paradox of the settlements: on one hand, Israel claims that settlements do not affect the final status agreement and can be evacuated at any time – a notion recently backed by U.S. President Barack Obama’s decision to give up the demand for a settlement freeze – yet in every round of negotiations, the Israeli government presents new facts on the ground as fait accompli, and demands that the proposed solution be adjusted to accommodate them.

Palestinian protesters and IDF soldiers at the beginning of the weekly protest near Bil’in. The apartment buildings of Modi’in Ilit can be seen in the distance. March 29, 2013 (photo: Noam Sheizaf)
Nothings seems further away from the diplomatic game than a walk through the hills surrounding Bil’in under a surprisingly bright sun. It wasn’t the State Department or the European Union that rescued some of the village’s land, only the struggle of the local farmers, which entered its ninth year this month. Two of the village’s residents – a brother and sister – have been killed, hundreds wounded, arrested and imprisoned. But the people of Bil’in did what almost nobody else could– they stopped the growth of a settlement and pushed the wall closer to the Green Line.
On Fridays, there is an almost tangible awareness of village’s history in the air, whether it’s the number of international activists and visitors – at least two dozen this week — or the shop selling Palestinian flags and scarves in the center of the village. Right next to the wall, almost a mile from the edge of the village, there is a playground for kids, new and brightly collored, undoubtedly a “fact on the ground,” that is meant to demonstrate the village’s connection to those hills. I also noticed new terraces and plantations, while the root of the old barrier, which once separated Bil’in from its land, is gradually fading, now no more than a dirt road.
The protest itself is like most I’ve seen – a peaceful march to the wall, some singing and waving of flags, and a few dozen meters away, some shabab (youths) throwing stones at soldiers on the other side of the road. The army sprays the infamous putrid ‘skunk’ liquid across the wall in the general direction of the protesters. Further east, on a tiny ramp beyond the wall, a group of ultra-Orthodox teenagers gather to watch the action. This has also become a kind of ritual.
After several stones get closer to the soldiers, the army starts shooting tear gas at the protesters, which spread across the field. Later, a convoy of several army vehicle pass through a gate in the wall, and some soldiers start chasing theshabab. More tear gas is shot, and a grenade lands right next to where I’m standing with my friend. The gas is unpleasant.
I am told that the army hasn’t crossed to the other side of the wall in a long time. The shabab are blocking the road with stones as army jeeps pass by the playground – now engulfed in tear gas – and drive over the newly-formed plantations, as if to insult the locals’ efforts to reclaim their land. We recover from the effect of the gas and head back towards the village.
The drive back to Tel Aviv takes 20 minutes. Entering the city with its Friday morning crowd packing into cafes and promenades used to be the most shaking part of the trip to the protests, but this effect is fading too.

Ultra-Orthodox teens (in the distance) from Modi’in Ilit watch over the weekly protest in Bil’in, March 29, 2013 (photo: Noam Sheizaf)
For additional original analysis and breaking news, visit +972 Magazine's Facebook page or follow us on Twitter. Our newsletter features a comprehensive round-up of the week's events. Sign up here.










**************************************************
http://www.pbs.org/pov/5brokencameras/photo_gallery_background.php?photo=2#.UsOjrFtDtxw

5 Broken Cameras

Premiere Date: August 26, 2013

'5 Broken Cameras' in Context

Bil’in



The Palestinian village of Bil’in is located in the central West Bank, 12 kilometers (7.45 miles) west of Ramallah, Palestine’s de facto capital city, and 4 kilometers (2.49 miles) inside the “Green Line” that divides the West Bank from Israel proper. The majority of residents of Bil’in are Muslim, and the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics reports a population of approximately 1,800. The land is about 988 acres in size, and the residents depend on agriculture as their main source of income.
Construction of the security barrier in the Bil’in area began in 2005, and since then approximately 55 percent of Bil’in’s former land has been used for the construction of the Modi’in Illit settlement. With more than 50,000 residents, it is one of the largest and fastest growing settlements in the West Bank.
Every Friday since 2005, protesters have gathered in Bil’in for demonstrations against the barrier’s route, making the village a symbol of resistance. Protesters have included the village’s Popular Resistance Committee, as well as international and Israeli peace activists. Other villages followed Bil’in’s lead, staging demonstrations as the barrier approached. In response, the Israeli army stepped up its defense.
Hundreds of protestors have been arrested since the demonstrations began, and dozens of protesters and Israeli security officers have been injured. While the protesters claim their demonstrations are nonviolent, some supporters of the barrier disagree. In 2010, the Israeli military declared the area a closed military zone in an attempt to stop demonstrations, effectively banning non-residents from the village.
In June 2011 the Israel Defense Forces began a relocation of the security barrier due to the 2007 Israel Supreme Court ruling that ordered settlement construction to halt and the barrier to be rerouted back toward Israel on state land. The new route was moved closer to the “Green Line” (Israel’s boundary prior to the 1967 Six-Day War), restoring some of Bil’in’s land. 2.7 kilometers (1.7 miles) of the barrier (in the form of a barbed wire fence) were replaced with a 3.2-kilometer (1.9-mile) concrete wall.
The Israel Defense Forces report that the relocation cost Israel $7.5 million, and another $1.5 million will be required to make the restored land suitable for agriculture.
Approximately 320 acres of land still remain west of the relocated barrier, in the Modi'in Illit settlement. Protests continue.
Sources:
» BBC News. “Guide to the West Bank Barrier.”
» Bil’in, a Village of Palestine. “Bil’in to Welcome Members of Shministim at Friday Demonstration.”
» FRONTLINE World. “Israel: The Unexpected Candidate.” 
» Greenberg, Hanan. “IDF Takes Down Bilin Fence.” YNet News, June 22, 2011.
» Harris, Emily. “A Decade in the Making, West Bank Barrier is Nearly Complete.” National Public Radio, May 22, 2013.
» Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs. “Israel, the Conflict and Peace: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions.”
» Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs. “Popular Resistance Committees.”
» Pfeffer, Anshel. “Mass Demonstration in Bil’in Marks Five Years of Protest Against West Bank Separation Fence.” Haaretz, February 21, 2010.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3K-mGWy9iUg

5 Broken Cameras Palestinian Documentary




http://www.pbs.org/pov/5brokencameras/

5 Broken Cameras

WATCH THE TRAILER

PBS Premiere: August 26, 2013

Synopsis

Nominated for an Oscar®, 5 Broken Cameras is a deeply personal first-hand account of life and nonviolent resistance in Bil’in, a West Bank village where Israel is building a security fence. Palestinian Emad Burnat, who bought his first camera in 2005 to record the birth of his youngest son, shot the film and Israeli filmmaker Guy Davidi co-directed. The filmmakers follow one family’s evolution over five years, witnessing a child’s growth from a newborn baby into a young boy who observes the world unfolding around him. The film is a Palestinian-Israeli-French co-production.