Friday, August 31, 2012

August 31, 2012 Muse Letter


time leaks out the balloon of the day
and I am still waiting for the Muse to come
and pick me up to hurl me through the window
to the other world
but he hasn’t come  

the day has gone like a beam of light through a prism
fractured to colors    in wavelengths rowed and scant
I cannot find a single path to mine   the door I seek is hidden
the world gasps its last   while the pearl of the marsh shell
falters in the dimming light   a stick that is the moon will soon arrive

supporting the night    I wait for a line to drop like a lure
from a fishing partner who is a stranger    the waters ripple
above  and it is murk all about    even Thoreau cannot hold me content
the words he says seems true but what can I do to make my own?  the Muse
should be boring through the walls like a woodpecker’s beak and eating me

but no just like a man   he is late with his affections and I am starved
for his attentions   I sift through words which fall like flour and can’t make sense of
it all   while outside the marsh combs her waves with a cattail brush
the singing grasses preach a harvest     a line of children make their marks
on the sand by the playground (that has finally decided to be itself and open to them)

and I sit in the room without company
the Muse is absent   (where he is I can’t say  it is all uncertain)
the violent green that is all about will soon be coated with the white glacier
that rides a bicycle of the seasons to stop by my garden and take all the children
that have lived in the beds     then it will be funereal (more than it is now) the words

will be flocks of Canada geese writing on the tablet of the blue sky
and I will mope   the door will stay shut and I will grope
the Muse is a rascal and will not enter this unharem
I can’t say why I even try to write to him and beg his attentions
he is a desperate flirt and has other girls      oh well I might as well be a cast off shoe

that he has forgotten   one day he might look for me
and find me here still bolted in place
withered dry like a smoked fish on a line
still wishing for a poem that he has given that isn’t a penance
at least then he will realize    I have been faithful

that is all I need


outside the sun is blotting up the green
with such a golden streak
the muddle of the clouds that was before
have all run out the door
and an internal knot
dissolves
as I watch the blue
I could sit here and stare at nothing
but instead I focus
in the essay that I read
Thoreau has said a few
hearty and true things
that buck up me 
and I can’t be discouraged
I sift through his wise thoughts
and I no longer doubt
there is an incremental increase
in the state of all mankind
even though the traffic
seems the same as before
I shut the false in a box and
put the strings around the cardboard
and instead of looking inside at the darkness spills
or at the widening chasm below my feet
where the box is placed
I look outside
the marsh is gloved in dogwood
the berries are everywhere on the ash
and all the clematis vines are furred on the fence
everything seems to understand
they are running out of time
and must work hard
(as must I)
to reach the improbable goal
for which I reach
a child comes through the door
and sits on my lap
and we are quite intact
that is all I need
to make the world sure
the child and I




We’re ready to divorce the old and marry the new.


Think.

And always ask yourself: Is it true?

By asking just one simple question you can then speak the truth to everyone you meet and refuse to be complaisant when we are given advertisements instead of real performance.

We—the ordinary people are idiots sometimes.
We marry into a political party and become lifelong committed partners.
But once we decide the marriage is over, there is no saving the political party we ditch.

Here is why I know this:



·  1 History
So according to Wiki, the Liberal Party was our marriage partner from 1905-1921 After a history of corruption, they were let go by the electorate. One Premier –Premier Sifton even got a corruption word made out of his name—“Siftonism””  before going onto greater fame in federal politics.


Arthur Sifton would replace Rutherford as premier. Shortly before the 1913 election Sifton's Liberals jammed through a controversial bill greatly expanding the size of the legislative assembly. The bill was once again said to gerrymander boundaries in Liberals favor.[3][4] The press and opposition would term his reign as premier "Siftonism" implying that his reign was a disease on Alberta.[5] Sifton would only last one term as premier as he left to pursue a career in federal politics.[6]
**
After divorcing the Liberals, Albertans married “United Farmers” and kept the relationship strong between 1921-1935.

Apparently they were considered immoral since they did the sorts of things that are commonplace now.


Brownlee's reign as government leader was troubled by the onset of the great depression. He resigned in scandal after he was accused of sexual acts with a minor in the Attorney General's office. This and another scandalous divorce by Oran McPherson, speaker of the legislative assembly, gave the United Farmers an image of moral decay.[8] In 1934 Richard Reid would replace Brownlee and lead the United Farmers government into total defeat at the hands of the new Social Credit party.**
******
The great depression altered the minds of Albertans who now needed help just to put bread on the table so they voted for Social Credit and kept this partner from 1935-1971.

One thing about Albertans that  I admire is that they are tenacious folks and certainly try to keep the relationship going even when it turns into a spousal abuse situation as it is now in Alberta.

But the Social Credits weren’t morally in decay since this party appears to be all about born again Christianity.


Albertans turned away from the United Farmers government and began to follow evangelical radio preacher William Aberhart, known as Bible Bill. The Social Credit party was quickly founded. Voters flocked to the radical monetary reforms proposed by Clifford Douglas to look for an escape to the Great Depression. Social Credit was elected with a massive majority in the 1935 election completely wiping out the United Farmers. Aberhart had a difficult time trying to implement the Social Credit theory and began to become unpopular almost losing his government in 1940.[9]
**

Note the line I have underlined:

Social Credit was elected with a massive majority in the 1935 election completely wiping out the United Farmers

**

This is  a forecast that I am giving you all.
In four years time the same fate awaits the Progressive Conservative Party of Alberta and also the Federal Conservative Party (if it doesn’t shape up).

For once ordinary folks in Alberta get fed up, they get fed up in a big way and do not look back.
The United Farmers party was completely wiped out even though it was in business for a while.  

The Social Credit party did fine until they started looking old and fagged compared to the young boys in the Progressive Conservative Party that ended 36 years of rule by the Social Credit in 1971.

So the Progressive Conservative Party has been in power from 1971 to the present.
Based on the history given by Wiki I think the only reason the PC party is still here is because of big oil propping them up and the fact that folks were fooled. Also there is no reliable opposition party to replace them.

All the other previous parties had a reliable party that could take over the relationship that Albertans make in politics.
Right now we don’t have a reliable partner in the wings and one needs to form pronto.
We don’t like divorcing our political party and not having another one to marry.

Where are you political party?
Show yourself.
We’re ready to divorce the old and marry the new.

We have only four years to wait and we can get out of the abusive relationship we are in and marry a fresh new political party.
I can't wait.



what is fracking?

While reading on big oil I came across these matters:




Op-Ed Contributor

Destroying Precious Land for Gas


ON the northern tip of Delaware County, N.Y., where the Catskill Mountains curl up into little kitten hills, and Ouleout Creek slithers north into the Susquehanna River, there is a farm my parents bought before I was born. My earliest memories there are of skipping stones with my father and drinking unpasteurized milk. There are bald eagles and majestic pines, honeybees and raspberries. My mother even planted a ring of white birch trees around the property for protection.

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A few months ago I was asked by a neighbor near our farm to attend a town meeting at the local high school. Some gas companies at the meeting were trying very hard to sell us on a plan to tear through our wilderness and make room for a new pipeline: infrastructure for hydraulic fracturing. Most of the residents at the meeting, many of them organic farmers, were openly defiant. The gas companies didn’t seem to care. They gave us the feeling that whether we liked it or not, they were going to fracture our little town.
In the late ’70s, when Manhattanites like Andy Warhol and Bianca Jagger were turning Montauk and East Hampton into an epicurean Shangri-La for the Studio 54 crowd, my parents, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, were looking to become amateur dairy farmers. My first introduction to a cow was being taught how to milk it by hand. I’ll never forget the realization that fresh milk could be so much sweeter than what we bought in grocery stores. Although I was rarely able to persuade my schoolmates to leave Long Island for what seemed to them an unreasonably rural escapade, I was lucky enough to experience trout fishing instead of tennis lessons, swimming holes instead of swimming pools and campfires instead of cable television.
Though my father died when I was 5, I have always felt lucky to live on land he loved dearly; land in an area that is now on the verge of being destroyed. When the gas companies showed up in our backyard, I felt I needed to do some research. I looked into Pennsylvania, where hundreds of families have been left with ruined drinking water, toxic fumes in the air, industrialized landscapes, thousands of trucks and new roads crosshatching the wilderness, and a devastating and irreversible decline in property value.
Natural gas has been sold as clean energy. But when the gas comes from fracturing bedrock with about five million gallons of toxic water per well, the word “clean” takes on a disturbingly Orwellian tone. Don’t be fooled. Fracking for shale gas is in truth dirty energy. It inevitably leaks toxic chemicals into the air and water. Industry studies show that 5 percent of wells can leak immediately, and 60 percent over 30 years. There is no such thing as pipes and concrete that won’t eventually break down. It releases a cocktail of chemicals from a menu of more than 600 toxic substances, climate-changing methane, radium and, of course, uranium.
New York is lucky enough to have some of the best drinking water in the world. The well water on my family’s farm comes from the same watersheds that supply all the reservoirs in New York State. That means if our tap water gets dirty, so does New York City’s.
Gas produced this way is not climate- friendly. Within the first 20 years, methane escaping from within and around the wells, pipelines and compressor stations is 105 times more powerful a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. With more than a tiny amount of methane leakage, this gas is as bad as coal is for the climate; and since over half the wells leak eventually, it is not a small amount. Even more important, shale gas contains one of the earth’s largest carbon reserves, many times more than our atmosphere can absorb. Burning more than a small fraction of it will render the climate unlivable, raise the price of food and make coastlines unstable for generations.
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, when speaking for “the voices in the sensible center,” seems to think the New York State Association of County Health Officials, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the New York State Nurses Association and the Medical Society of the State of New York, not to mention Dr. Anthony R. Ingraffea’s studies at Cornell University, are “loud voices at the extremes.” The mayor’s plan to “make sure that the gas is extracted carefully and in the right places” is akin to a smoker telling you, “Smoking lighter cigarettes in the right place at the right time makes it safe to smoke.”
Few people are aware that America’s Natural Gas Alliance has spent $80 million in a publicity campaign that includes the services of Hill and Knowlton — the public relations firm that through most of the ’50s and ’60s told America that tobacco had no verifiable links to cancer. Natural gas is clean, and cigarettes are healthy — talk about disinformation. To try to counteract this, my mother and I have started a group called Artists Against Fracking.
My father could have chosen to live anywhere. I suspect he chose to live here because being a New Yorker is not about class, race or even nationality; it’s about loving New York. Even the United States Geological Survey has said New York’s draft plan fails to protect drinking water supplies, and has also acknowledged the likely link between hydraulic fracturing and recent earthquakes in the Midwest. Surely the voice of the “sensible center” would ask to stop all hydraulic fracturing so that our water, our lives and our planet could be protected and preserved for generations to come.


Sean Lennon Attacks Fracking in Op-Ed

Process of extracting natural gas is 'dirty energy,' singer says

August 28, 2012 12:00 PM ET

Sean Lennon
Dave M. Benett/Getty Images
Sean Lennon ripped fracking today in a New York Times op-ed, saying the process of extracting natural gas has been falsely portrayed as "clean." "Natural gas has been sold as clean energy," Lennon wrote. "But when the gas comes from fracturing bedrock with about five million gallons of toxic water per well, the word 'clean' takes on a disturbingly Orwellian tone. Don't be fooled."
Fracking, also known as hydraulic fracturing, uses water and chemicals to free natural gas trapped in rock deposits below the surface of the earth. Lennon says there's simply no way the process can be clean. "Fracking for shale gas is in truth dirty energy," he writes. "It inevitably leaks toxic chemicals into the air and water. Industry studies show that 5 percent of wells can leak immediately, and 60 percent over 30 years. There is no such thing as pipes and concrete that won't eventually break down. It releases a cocktail of chemicals from a menu of more than 600 toxic substances, climate-changing methane, radium and, of course, uranium."
Lennon frets that fracking could contaminate reservoirs and harm the tap water supply of his hometown, New York City, and cause long-lasting damage to the climate of the planet. "Within the first 20 years, methane escaping from within and around the wells, pipelines and compressor stations is 105 times more powerful a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide," he writes. "With more than a tiny amount of methane leakage, this gas is as bad as coal is for the climate; and since over half the wells leak eventually, it is not a small amount. Even more important, shale gas contains one of the earth’s largest carbon reserves, many times more than our atmosphere can absorb. Burning more than a small fraction of it will render the climate unlivable, raise the price of food and make coastlines unstable for generations."
In response, Lennon and his mother, Yoko Ono, are starting Artists Against Fracking, which they describe as "a new coalition of artists, musicians, filmmakers and public figures opposed to hydraulic fracking." The group already includes Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, David Bryne, Lady Gaga, Wilco, MGMT, Bonnie Raitt, Alec Baldwin, Liv Tyler and more. For more information on Artists Against Fracking, visit the coalition's website.