Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Hi Pam, While I was doing mask and machine duty on Tuesday November 25, 2014, I provided copies of two letters from the various departments in the government of Alberta--to Jessie. She is to give these letters to Sathya who will hand them out to the folks I have specified. These letters indicate the funding sources for respiratory patients at long term care facilities. Since there has been in the past considerable confusion with both social workers and nurses at this facility about who pays for what, I have provided four copies addressed to Sandy,Erin, yourself and one copy for the nurses which I have addressed to Sathya.

- Forwarded Message -----
From: "jyali <julie.ali@
To: "Pam Purdy" <ppurdy@gss.org>, "Erin Foster" <efoster@gss.org>, sterlson@gss.org, tbuffam@gss.org, "Sindy Thompson" <sthompson@gss.org>, "Sandra Burnham" <sburnham@gss.org>, "Jackie Leaver" <jmleaver@gss.org>, "jillian barber" <jillian.barber@albertahealthservices.ca>, "official administrator" <official.administrator@albertahealthservices.ca>, "AHS Corp" <ahs.corp@albertahealthservices.ca>, "janet davidson" <janet.davidson@albertahealthservices.ca>, "edmonton whitemud" <edmonton.whitemud@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary foothills" <calgary.foothills@assembly.ab.ca>, "HS Associate Minister" <hs.associateminister@gov.ab.ca>, "edmonton ellerslie" <edmonton.ellerslie@assembly.ab.ca>, "edmonton glenora" <edmonton.glenora@assembly.ab.ca>
Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 1:05:14 AM
Subject: guidance for nurses, social workers and the top dogs

Hi Pam,

While I was doing mask and machine duty on Tuesday November 25, 2014, I provided copies of two letters from the various departments in the government of Alberta--to Jessie. She is to give these letters to Sathya who will hand them out to the folks I have specified. These letters indicate the funding sources for respiratory patients at long term care facilities. Since there has been in the past considerable confusion with both social workers and nurses at this facility about who pays for what, I have provided four copies addressed to Sandy,Erin, yourself and one copy for the nurses which I have addressed to Sathya.

The first letter is from 2010; the second from 2014 and the two letters thus cover the entire range of difficulties in obtaining supplies for my sister at this facility between 2010 to 2014. These are guidance letters for all staff to ensure that from the bottom to the top there will be no more situations where patients are put at risk especially handicapped patients without insight who cannot tell their families their dire situations.

While I understand you were not present while all this disgraceful unprofessional junk was going on I have still provided you with a copy of the two letters since you are in charge of fixing the mess you did not create. I would like your copy to be put in my sister's records after you have read it.

I want everyone to review these letters to dispel the frank misconceptions that other departments such as Aids to Daily Living, AISH or even the person on the street is responsible for say a BiPaP mask replacement.  I want no other patient family to go through this farce of misconceptions that has ensured that my sister would be without a mask replacement for five years; certainly she had an unsafe mask made out of parts that was dangerous and the only other mask was one that was not recommended for use. Frankly  I do not even believe staff at this facility were under misconceptions; the staff knew that the facility was responsible for the supplies/services but simply ignored the facility's responsibilities because of funding shortages that should not in any way have prevented the site manager from meeting his obligations to meet the standards of care. The standards of care are not dependent on funding--they are independent of funding. If the society hasn't got the money to do the work it must do it must give up the business of patient care and go into livestock management where it would probably do better than in taking care of vulnerable human beings. In my mind it is unconscionable that a group of people knew of this mess, knew that money was the reason for this mess and instead listened to a nurse who was frankly endangering patients; the staff should have reported him to higher ups and then demanded that patients be taken care of. Instead of this they kept their mouths shut, let the patients suffer and in my sister's case--they let her go without adequate supplies/replacement/mask cleaning for years without saying anything. Shame on them all!

But I am told that no one knew. Really?
The collective lack of knowledge at this facility if I may call it that rather than frank fantasy over the situation ---is abominable.
The social worker knew that the organization was responsible for paying for the supplies but acted as if it was not the organization's duty to replace the mask. I went to the AISH folks and Aids to Daily Living who also failed to tell me the truth. The truth is per the letter of 2010 where it is clearly stated by at least one minister that the folks at the Good Samaritan Society need to pay up and AHS needs to pay the Good Samaritan Society.
Why did the social worker---not do the right thing? Its a good question. I suggest the CEO ask Sandy this and why the confusion continued even when it was at the meeting with Bill where they were explaining that it was my sister's non-compliance that somehow was responsible for Bill's failure to do his job. The student social worker at this meeting has had good training in ethics based on the performances I witnessed at this meeting where Bill was all apologetic and saying that he should have gone to his supervisor for more funds.  I guess he only realized his mistake when I was sending the bill for the BiPaP mask I bought to Mr. Horne for reimbursement. Surprisingly this decision to send the bill to the health minister resulted in almost instantaneous payment of the bill by T. Buffam who professed at the meeting on October 3, 2014 that she had been happy to do this repayment for my sister. Really?  Well can she explain why my sister's mask had not been replaced every single year?  Could she explain why the mask had to be replaced by me rather than the facility?
As for the social worker part in all of this--it's puzzling to me. I thought the social worker was on the side of patients. But this does not seem to be the case.
You would expect social workers to know their job requirements and the ethical demands of their profession but this has not been my experience.
Instead of intervening in the yearly conference where I was asking about the mask and explaining the responsibilities of the facility you have the social worker simply get Erin to write down that I am asking about the mask.
So neat. I am inquiring about the mask.

Then the facility manager's role in ensuring everyone is muzzled. He comes to me to tell me that it is the fault of patient care based funding that there is no money in the respiratory bank to pay for anything. This is so odd. He doesn't hire a respiratory therapist for two out of the five years my sister is at this place and he still has no money to pay for a mask for her after five years of the same mask? What can I say? He must be a really poor money manager or else PCBF is a crock. In any case you would think he would consider my sister's health. But nope, he ignores it.  You would expect nurses like Mr. Taylor to know the job requirements of facility manager and to do the best to meet the ethical demands of the nursing profession but certainly he didn't (in my opinion) meet any sort of professional ethical requirements and all he had to offer me at the meeting to explain why the mask was in a mess in 2014 was that he should have gone to his supervisor. Really?  Why didn't he go inside himself instead outside himself? If he had gone inside himself he would not have needed to go to a supervisor; he would have ensured that the standards of care were met in any way he could simply because he cared about my sister.

And that's at the heart of the problems with my sister isn't it? No one cared enough to do anything. Even the family was fed up. We are all in this together. Unfortunately it hasn't resulted in such a good self evaluation right now has it? I'd say there is a lot of work to be done. And I have to say Pam, it doesn't start in the outside of people, but it does start in the heart. If people don't care, there is no hope.

I am especially disappointed with people who had the files of my sister and were responsible for review of the files such as Sandy. How did Sandy fail to see that the mask was not a major problem? How did Erin simply write down that I was inquiring about the mask and not reflect on the fact that she had called me about the mask being in pieces? How did we all go round and round like this?
The failure of the social worker to demand investigation of the failures of the facility manager is regrettable and reflects poorly on her. I don't know how folks reconcile this sort of dissonance in their heads. It must be a sort of player mentality. It's not right and I see no reason to put up with the players where vulnerable patients are concerned. Either all these players do their jobs and do them well or they should be terminated.
End of story.

As for the rest of the nursing staff. We have a group of folks who saw the absence of the respiratory therapist; they could see my sister's mask in pieces; they even called me about the mess of her mask but not one of them told us the major problems---no replacement of the mask; shoddy worn mask; no sort of respiratory therapist in attendance for months on end; tubing/hose/mask cleaning by a nurse who doesn't  clean the parts of the machine such as connecting valve; and when Pedro doesn't do the cleaning who does? And where is the documentation of the cleaning/care?

The nurses need to review the letter I have given to Sathya so that they may be offered guidance in what to do if such an abominable situation arises. They are to go to the patient families. They are to say the problems clearly.They are to provide families who don't know the funding requirements for respiratory supplies the information that I have provided for them. They are to advocate for the patients. Since it is clear to me that no one has done this at the facility let me start with these nurses, LPNs and nursing aides. Each of them should know that if the facility manager fails his job, they are to report the problems to the patient families. This way something will get done. No more silence. No more cover ups. Patient safety first.

And so, we have letters --official letters that I have provided to staff. I show it to Pedro and Pedro tells me he just glanced at it. He's not interested. Maybe that is the problem of the facility. Folks just don't care enough to learn something new so that patients might be kept safe. In that case, maybe the entire crew should be let go except for the few who do care and do their work so that patients are kept safe.  Why are we paying for staff who don't know their jobs and don't want to work professionally? Why are we paying for managers who get promotions for harming our family members? Why are we keeping on staff who did not advocate for patients?

Why? I would say it is because of the people at the top of this organization. The folks at the top set the philosophy of the organization. Like the folks at the top of the AHS pyramid we have players and no workers and so you have the folks at the bottom---who aren't the real professionals we need in the work place. The problems of the staff are the problems of the top of this organization; it begins at the top.

Please ensure that the letters are in my sister's file just in case we have new staff who don't know right from wrong.

Sincerely,

Julie Ali

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

--A decade ago, Jessica Ernst startled Albertans with video of her drinking water catching fire as it flowed from the kitchen tap in her Rosebud-area farm east of Calgary. For four years, she fought to find out what caused methane to suddenly start flowing into her well, alleging that contamination occurred after hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” occurred in the area. Finally, in 2007, Ernst launched a lawsuit against the energy regulator, Alberta Environment and Encana, alleging they failed to investigate properly and take remedial action. Seven years later, Ernst has won a major victory Alberta’s Court of Queen’s Bench. Chief Justice Neil Wittmann tossed out Alberta Environment’s long-standing argument for immunity in the case and ruled the department can be sued for failing to properly investigate the contamination. The provincial government three times tried to derail Ernst’s lawsuit, arguing it could not be sued because it had statutory immunity. In other words, individual landowners could not take the department or the energy regulator to court if they felt an investigation was faulty or negligent. Alberta Environment also argued it has a “duty of care” to the public in general, but not a “private duty of care” to individual citizens. But Wittmann, in a bold and well-reasoned decision, has overturned that dubious position and shifted the balance to give landowners the right to sue. It’s also a decision that benefits all citizens who can demand stronger accountability from their government.-----------------Victor Hafichuk · Top Commenter · Manitoba Institute of Technology Let truth and justice prevail.


The Ken and Barbie journalists at the Edmonton Journal are finally opening their plastic chests to show that they are still alive and are speaking for Jessica Ernst. But when will ordinary Albertans do the same?
When will they support Jess who has done the work of an army of citizens?
When will we donate to her lawsuit?
When will we write to the corrupt crew in the Tory parties at all levels and tell them to start their job of representing the citizens and not the oil and gas industry?
We hire and we fire.
Let's fire.

And I'm not talking well water on fire.

Go Jess go!

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/opinion/editorials/Thursday+Editorial+victory+little/10375680/story.html

Thursday’s Editorial: A victory for the little guy

EDMONTON JOURNAL NOVEMBER 13, 2014
Thursday&#8217;s Editorial: A victory for the little guy
 

In this 2011 photo, Jessica Ernst burns off some of the methane that is in her well water in Rosebud,.

Photograph by: Jeff McIntosh , THE CANADIAN PRESS

In this 2011 photo, Jessica Ernst burns off some of the methane that is in her well water in Rosebud,.

Photograph by: Jeff McIntosh , THE CANADIAN PRESS

A decade ago, Jessica Ernst startled Albertans with video of her drinking water catching fire as it flowed from the kitchen tap in her Rosebud-area farm east of Calgary.
For four years, she fought to find out what caused methane to suddenly start flowing into her well, alleging that contamination occurred after hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” occurred in the area.
Finally, in 2007, Ernst launched a lawsuit against the energy regulator, Alberta Environment and Encana, alleging they failed to investigate properly and take remedial action.
Seven years later, Ernst has won a major victory Alberta’s Court of Queen’s Bench.
Chief Justice Neil Wittmann tossed out Alberta Environment’s long-standing argument for immunity in the case and ruled the department can be sued for failing to properly investigate the contamination.
The provincial government three times tried to derail Ernst’s lawsuit, arguing it could not be sued because it had statutory immunity. In other words, individual landowners could not take the department or the energy regulator to court if they felt an investigation was faulty or negligent.
Alberta Environment also argued it has a “duty of care” to the public in general, but not a “private duty of care” to individual citizens.
But Wittmann, in a bold and well-reasoned decision, has overturned that dubious position and shifted the balance to give landowners the right to sue.
It’s also a decision that benefits all citizens who can demand stronger accountability from their government.
This ruling may also promote better environmental protection. Alberta Environment and the regulator will have added incentive to uphold standards to full extent, to be vigilant in investigating spills and incidents.
Wittmann’s decision is particularly timely, given the massive changes in Alberta’s environmental enforcement system implemented in the last year.
At industry’s request, the provincial government handed over the job of enforcing the Water Act and other environmental laws to the new regulator, now called the Alberta Energy Regulator.
Concerns have been raised that the regulator, headed by a former oilpatch lobbyist and paid for entirely by industry, may go easier on energy companies when it is enforcing those laws.
Wittmann’s decision has added a potential check — if the regulator does not do its job in good faith, it can be taken to court.
In its defence, the government raised the spectre that lifting immunity will result in a flood of lawsuits.
We certainly hope that does not happen, for many important reasons. Getting bogged down in court is costly and hardly desirable for any party.
Nor do we expect that to happen given most companies endeavour to uphold environmental standards, and the Prentice government is sending clear messages about the importance of doing so.
But a judgment that gives individuals access to the courts when there is the possibility of negligence by public agencies is an encouraging step in a province that prizes individual rights, landowners’ protection and high environmental standards.
For Ernst, the battle is far from over. Her water is still contaminated, she does not know the chemicals Encana used in their fracking process that fires water, sand and chemicals into the ground at high pressure to release natural gas. Meanwhile, her legal odyssey continues. Ernst next heads to the Supreme Court of Canada to overturn the regulator’s heavy-handed decision to ban her from further communication. We hope she wins that one, too.
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the Journal’s editorial board, comprising Margo Goodhand, Kathy Kerr, Karen Booth, Sarah O’Donnell and David Evans.
  • D Murray Armitage
    Having worked for the Provincial government for over 38 years, I am relieved for the most part to see the courts take the responsibility andplace it back on the elected officials who often manage to interfere politically in the day to day jobs of government employees wishing only to do their jobs effectively and as they are meant to. This is slightly tempered with concern that every nut-bar out there will start to launch frivolous law suits in an attempt to get their way even when that is unfair to the rest of Albertans. In this particular case it looks like this individual may have been dealt with in a heavy handed way - on the surface at least.
    • Gerry Brin ·  Top Commenter · University of Alberta
      Nice to see the underdog win. This is a huge legal precedent for farmers seeking to protect their water from being contaminated with carcinogenic compounds used in fracking
      • Victor Hafichuk ·  Top Commenter · Manitoba Institute of Technology
        Let truth and justice prevail.

      -cointoss It is truly sad and vary disgusting after the billions of dollars that have been thrown at the Alberta Health System for decades by the obviously utterly incompetent and incapable Alberta PCs who have poured billions into this black hole and just can not seem to get it to work or function with any degree of efficiency or provide services that are always lagging way to far behind demand and only gets endless temporary fixes band aid solutions and more hot air and empty political rhetoric spouted by abut solutions by a succession of less than competent health ministers. Wonder when this new one is going to decide to go out for a walk and eat a cookie which speaks to the seriously questionable ability of the Alberta PCs to ever be capable to chose or even act wisely at any level especially health care. Hope this man is placed in a decent care facility so his family is able to know that he is safe and well liked after. « les--------------seeker444--In the big picture here, one has to think about how Alberta Conservative governments, over many years, have not done responsible revenue flow. This includes too low royalty rates and too low taxes. We have lost $5 to 6 billion/year because of the 10% flat tax and goodness only knows how many billions we've lost due to too low royalty rates. Perhaps a suggestion would be to reopen the 20 bed locked unit (Little Bow Continuing Care Centre) in Carmangay, AB which was always full and provided a really great service. This facility passed inspection muster shortly before it was closed. These locked unit beds are greatly needed in AB and have been for years. The patients requiring these beds have been falling through the cracks for, literally, years and years. Now is the time to begin the much more responsible revenue flow which would contribute to the funding for these much needed facilities. Other provinces have progressive taxes, sales taxes, charge for health care premiums, are considering getting in on the renewable tech revolution.......all things that now, subsequent AB governments will have to consider, particularly now that the price of oil is dropping and the global demand for oil is going to decrease. « less----------Backwards6 This is not a problem with funding. This is a problem with too many managers making well over 100K per year each. Period. Cut the excess fat, and you will see pretty fast how much extra health money is available.-------------Haggai One Nine Politician says: “But I can't help what was, I can only help what moving forward is.” While, in the same breath, politicians have sold out all Alberta's mineral resources to the USA for a mess of potage. They have then spent that small token on building speed tracks around its two principal cities so that Albertans can help use up that resource as fast as possible buying American gasoline driving American cars. "Can't help" what was designed in your manifesto?-------------kathyalten "It becomes more challenging to be able to place them;" they make it sound like they actually have places for other seniors, which is not true. So many seniors in need of long-term care beds, stuck in hospital beds at 5 times the cost, with no proper care, with no mental or physical stimulation. Is this part of the privatization agenda, make the public system work so poorly they can try to excuse ushering in a US style system, which is also overpriced with poor outcomes? Please stop making excuses and do your job, which is to serve the citizens of Alberta« less--------------dave777 Alberta Health Care system is garbage, too many years of political incompetence. Too much fat over paid inept management, some even prefer cookies over doing their jobs right. Want change, stop listening to the same old Tory story and vote differently. My PC Party MLA and I had a face to face and I could instantly see why these pandering goof balls couldn't run a cool-aid stand. Borrowing for Einstein: Insanity is voting the same way expecting better results.--------------Mandel said it's a problem that must be fixed. --------------“There should be no need for it. I guess the answer simply would be there wasn't an adequate place to put the individual, which isn't right either,” he said. “But I can't help what was, I can only help what moving forward is.”-----------------A B.C. woman says Alberta's health-care system is failing her mentally ill father. Louise Gilfoy's dad has been living in the psychiatric unit at the Foothills hospital for two years as he waits to be placed in continuing care. The 63-year-old man has schizophrenia and needs to be in a facility with a locked unit.---------“I feel like the Alberta health is not taking care of some of their most vulnerable citizens, such as people who are severely mentally ill who need specific kind of care,” she said. “Waiting two years is a hugely long time — 25 months for care. And there's no end in sight. [It's a] huge cost to the taxpayer, more emotional problems for my dad."-----------------always curious How can a place with so much money have so little compassion? What is wrong in Alberta? 17 hours ago 5 Likes Like Share Torres10 Flag Torres10 @always curious 43 Years wasted with Progressive Conservative incompetence, that's what's wrong!-------------QuestCo Very courageous for daughter Louise to advocate publicly for better care for those suffering with severe mental health disorders who are unable to advocate for themselves. How brave in spite of such public misinformation and stigma! Bravo! There are many of us who are compassionate, informed, and fully support humane care for those who suffer from such horribly disabling and no fault disorders/diseases. This is a province that should have moved away from the old victorian era of shame and stigma towards the best of care and most modern treatment available for the most debilitating of disorders.« less--

      by the grassy river
      where the heron stands as a stab
      in the water of darkness
      and the wings unfurl
      to make the poem
      of his flight
      will you see
      what is all about you?
      the small pale drop cloths of the leaves
      the root balls of the poplars digging
      into the blue sky
      the collapsible tents of the clouds
      foreign signs of the forest

      all the hands shaking hands
      of the boughs
      the rope of the shadows
      as you go inside
      the morning burst of the sun
      as a claw that opens the belly of the night
      harvest of the summer laid out in the open palms
      of the raspberry canes
      the roiling boil of the pink roses as they hip their bodies
      slippers of the day lilies as they golden
      on the ballrooms of the fall
      everywhere abundance     what have we been given
      the land in its shook out table cloth of remains
      crumbs of the meals we have eaten
      all the sounds      waxwings dancing in their flows
      and seething feeding       the red winged blackbirds
      trumpets     somewhere over the rainbow
      the messenger coming      

      scatter of the words
      dribble of the sounds
      the streak of the line
      gluttony of the form
      a shot at the target
        but who is right?
      the soul tethered to the rusted nail
      of the body
      the cry that howls
      we walk with the damned
      these small hands in ours
      we watch their faces
      we stand in the hallways
      waiting for the return
      in the night we dance
      with what remains
      of our beloveds

      http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/mentally-ill-dad-s-2-year-wait-in-hospital-for-long-term-care-unacceptable-daughter-tells-province-1.2846783

      Mentally ill dad’s 2-year wait in hospital for long-term care unacceptable, daughter tells province

      Alberta government failing father who has schizophrenia, says Louise Gilfoy

      CBC News Posted: Nov 24, 2014 7:16 AM MT Last Updated: Nov 25, 2014 9:36 AM MT
      Louise Gilfoy stands with her eight-month-old son Matteo outside the Foothills Medical Centre where her father, who has schizophrenia, has been for over two years while he waits for a continuing care placement.
      Louise Gilfoy stands with her eight-month-old son Matteo outside the Foothills Medical Centre where her father, who has schizophrenia, has been for over two years while he waits for a continuing care placement. (Jennifer Lee/CBC)
      533 shares


      Facebook



      Twitter



      Reddit



      Google



      Share



      Email

      Related Stories

      A B.C. woman says Alberta's health-care system is failing her mentally ill father.
      Louise Gilfoy's dad has been living in the psychiatric unit at the Foothills hospital for two years as he waits to be placed in continuing care.
      The 63-year-old man has schizophrenia and needs to be in a facility with a locked unit.
      Louise Gilfoy's dad
      Louise Gilfoy sits with her dad during a visit last year. He has been living in the psychiatric unit at the Foothills hospital for two years as he waits to be placed in continuing care. (Jennifer Lee/CBC)
      “I feel like the Alberta health is not taking care of some of their most vulnerable citizens, such as people who are severely mentally ill who need specific kind of care,” she said.
      “Waiting two years is a hugely long time — 25 months for care. And there's no end in sight. [It's a] huge cost to the taxpayer, more emotional problems for my dad."
      Gilfoy, who has been told her father could be waiting up to three years, recently wrote a letter to Alberta Health Minister Stephen Mandel to complain about the situation.
      "My father is a mentally ill man, not a prisoner, who is being punished by the Alberta government," she wrote in the letter.
      Mandel said it's a problem that must be fixed.        

      Province planning more long-term spaces

      “There should be no need for it. I guess the answer simply would be there wasn't an adequate place to put the individual, which isn't right either,” he said.
      “But I can't help what was, I can only help what moving forward is.”
      Mandel said the province plans to build a continuing care home in Calgary and one in Edmonton for patients — including those with mental illnesses — who need specialized care and who don’t belong in hospital beds.
      Dr. Francois Belanger, a medical director of Alberta Health Services (AHS), said by the end of the current fiscal year next March more than 450 continuing-care spaces will have been added to the Calgary zone.
      While he could not comment about specific cases, Belanger said wait times are highly variable and depend on many factors.
      "For example there are extenuating circumstances where a patient needs to be placed where we need to ensure the patient’s safety as well as other clients’ safety that live in a particular facility,” he said.
      “So then it becomes more challenging to be able to place them.”

      • prairiecentrist
      The psychiatric unit is care.... better than nothing.
      • 1 day ago
      •  
      • 4 Likes
      cointoss
      • cointoss
      @prairiecentrist Sadly we have already seen people walk out of unsecured psychiatric faculty's in Calgary with horrid consequences
      • 1 day ago
      •  
      • 3 Likes
      Louise Michelle
      • Louise Michelle
      @prairiecentrist I was told that because of his age (not geriatric) and his requirement for a locked unit, it makes him difficult to place. I was told that a bed will open up for him when someone dies. And that doesn't happen often because of the age of the residents in the homes where he meets the criteria. 

      The community programs really did try to keep him at home. When he went in the last time, he was deemed to be beyond being able to function successfully in the community. 

      Here's a link to the radio interview from this morning:http://www.cbc.ca/.../2014/11/24/psychiatric-space-shortage/ 
      « less
      • 1 day ago
      •  
      • 7 Likes
      urbanprogress
      • urbanprogress
      Thanks for speaking out Louise. Wishing the best for you and your family.

      • cointoss
      It is truly sad and vary disgusting after the billions of dollars that have been thrown at the Alberta Health System for decades by the obviously utterly incompetent and incapable Alberta PCs who have poured billions into this black hole and just can not seem to get it to work or function with any degree of efficiency or provide services that are always lagging way to far behind demand and only gets endless temporary fixes band aid solutions and more hot air and empty political rhetoric spouted by abut solutions by a succession of 
      less than competent health ministers. 
      Wonder when this new one is going to decide to go out for a walk and eat a cookie which speaks to the seriously questionable ability of the Alberta PCs to ever be capable to chose or even act wisely at any level especially health care. 
      Hope this man is placed in a decent care facility so his family is able to know that he is safe and well liked after. « les

      • seeker444

      In the big picture here, one has to think about how Alberta Conservative governments, over many years, have not done responsible revenue flow. This includes too low royalty rates and too low taxes. We have lost $5 to 6 billion/year because of the 10% flat tax and goodness only knows how many billions we've lost due to too low royalty rates. 
      Perhaps a suggestion would be to reopen the 20 bed locked unit (Little Bow Continuing Care Centre) in Carmangay, AB which was always full and provided a really great service. This facility passed inspection muster shortly before it was closed. 
      These locked unit beds are greatly needed in AB and have been for years. The patients requiring these beds have been falling through the cracks for, literally, years and years. 
      Now is the time to begin the much more responsible revenue flow which would contribute to the funding for these much needed facilities. 
      Other provinces have progressive taxes, sales taxes, charge for health care premiums, are considering getting in on the renewable tech revolution.......all things that now, subsequent AB governments will have to consider, particularly now that the price of oil is dropping and the global demand for oil is going to decrease. 
      « less

      • kag_abca
      Welcome to Alberta where a previous Premier decided to wreck the Health Care by funding cuts, hiring freezes, education admission limits and pulling down much need facilities so he could make private health care "look" more appealing and so he could claim Alberta as "debt free" although that didn't actually happen until the year he died (well after he had left office). Not everyone thinks he walked on water...
      • 1 day ago
      •  
      • 21 Likes
      pleasenotagain
      • pleasenotagain
      @kag_abca Before you fall off that soap box you are on you would do good to remember that this issue is not unique to Alberta. Mental health funding is terribly lacking in this country in all provinces
      • 1 day ago
      •  
      • 1 Like
      Really
      • Really
      @pleasenotagain That does not change the fact that the premier of the day took a wrecking ball to health care in Alberta. Thousands of nurses dismissed and we have still not recovered.


      • Backwards6
      This is not a problem with funding. This is a problem with too many managers making well over 100K per year each. Period. Cut the excess fat, and you will see pretty fast how much extra health money is available.


      • DMocracy
      I wish you all the best Ms. Louise Gilfoy and your dad, of course. All provincial governments better ramp-up all their long-term care facilities, especially for seniors, and including those for patients with mental health issues. The baby boomers are surging forward and their needs are not being met.


      • Haggai One Nine
      Politician says: “But I can't help what was, I can only help what moving forward is.” 

      While, in the same breath, politicians have sold out all Alberta's mineral resources to the USA for a mess of potage. They have then spent that small token on building speed tracks around its two principal cities so that Albertans can help use up that resource as fast as possible buying American gasoline driving American cars. 

      "Can't help" what was designed in your manifesto?

      • kathyalten
      "It becomes more challenging to be able to place them;" they make it sound like they actually have places for other seniors, which is not true. So many seniors in need of long-term care beds, stuck in hospital beds at 5 times the cost, with no proper care, with no mental or physical stimulation. Is this part of the privatization agenda, make the public system work so poorly they can try to excuse ushering in a US style system, which is also overpriced with poor outcomes? Please stop making excuses and do your job, which is to serve the citizens of Alberta« less

      • pleasenotagain
      Its sad that more children don't take an active role in caring for their aging parents. I know its not easy to rearrange your life for someone but please remember that our parents did exactly that for us when they raised us
      • 1 day ago
      •  
      • 4 Likes
      intobed
      • intobed
      @pleasenotagain 

      I live in a multi generational household, oldest is a woman who is early 90's and has dementia. Youngest is early 20's. My mom, me, my sweetie, and her son. We all look after each other. 

      I am thankful that I am able to look after my mom full time. I knew years ago I would be doing it, and made plans. 

      It is like this in the Maritimes, at least here in PEI. Family. friends, and neighbours are far far more important than financial wealth. We count on each other. PEI is not a wealthy province, but we have so much more than other provinces, especially Alberta. 

      Money is the only thing that matters in Alberta, and if you don't have it no one cares.« less
      • 1 day ago
      •  
      • 6 Likes
      CodieneC
      • CodieneC
      @pleasenotagain 

      From the sounds of it this man is not a candidate for at home care
      • 1 day ago
      •  
      • 10 Likes
      DaisyMae
      • DaisyMae
      @pleasenotagain - he's schizophrenic and needs to be in a secure facility. That's not a job for family, to be honest.
      • 1 day ago
      •  
      • 15 Likes
      intobed
      • intobed
      @CodieneC 

      Agreed. There is only so much that can be done at home, even with outside help and assistance. The father needs help and long term care from professional staff and caregivers. 

      My heart goes out to Louise. This has been a stress on her for many years. Good for you Louise for speaking out.

      • dave777
      Alberta Health Care system is garbage, too many years of political incompetence. Too much fat over paid inept management, some even prefer cookies over doing their jobs right. 

      Want change, stop listening to the same old Tory story and vote differently. My PC Party MLA and I had a face to face and I could instantly see why these pandering goof balls couldn't run a cool-aid stand. 

      Borrowing for Einstein: 

      Insanity is voting the same way expecting better results.

      • Ivan Wilson 25
      AB government has been closing long term care beds for years in favour of "assisted living" which is privatized, bare bones and temporary foreign worker staffed to a huge extent. 

      Pity any resident of the remaining long term care beds whose services have declined at an outrageous rate.

      • QuestCo
      Very courageous for daughter Louise to advocate publicly for better care for those suffering with severe mental health disorders who are unable to advocate for themselves. How brave in spite of such public misinformation and stigma! Bravo! 
      There are many of us who are compassionate, informed, and fully support humane care for those who suffer from such horribly disabling and no fault disorders/diseases. 
      This is a province that should have moved away from the old victorian era of shame and stigma towards the best of care and most modern treatment available for the most debilitating of disorders.« less

      • alphaomego
      Alberta's Health Care system is failing many Albertans and has been for a very long time. 

      Shame.

      • always curious
      How can a place with so much money have so little compassion? What is wrong in Alberta?
      • 17 hours ago
      •  
      • 5 Likes
      Torres10
      • Torres10
      @always curious 43 Years wasted with Progressive Conservative incompetence, that's what's wrong!