Friday, October 20, 2017

career politicians and their purpose in life

Leah McRorie updated her cover photo.
3 hrs
Love
Comment
Comments
Julie Ali They are not there to have solutions, the career politicians are there to add to our problems. Which they do.
ReplyJust now
Manage

#EnoughIsEnough============“Wait … you still haven’t told me what happened?” To which they responded: “Do you really want to know?” She was eventually told how, months previous, a Mackenzie Health nurse walked into her mother’s semiprivate room to find the curtains drawn around her bed. When they were pulled back, a hospital personal support worker was seen “aggressively sucking” on Sonja’s breasts. When Eva asked what else occurred, she was told “other things … you don’t want to know, it was horrible." One person present said members of the hospital's senior leadership team, including president and CEO Altaf Stationwalla and vice-president, chief operating officer and chief nursing executive Susan Kowlek had been made aware of the incident, Eva says. When she asked what the police said, she was told management decided not to call police because sexual assault charges would jeopardize the hospital’s reputation. The hospital said in a later statement its policy at the time was to report allegations to police only with the consent of the patient involved. When Eva suggested calling the police, she said they told her, “There’s no point in you doing it now, because your mother will not tell them anything anyway and it’s been such a long time.”



The problem is government is complicit in the cover up of harm to patients in the medical system and residents in the continuing care system. In this case, the top dog in the system refuses to speak to the press:
Despite repeated requests, Health Minister Eric Hoskins refused a chance to be interviewed on the subject.
**
In Alberta, the response is usually by the health minister directing families to Alberta Health Services (AHS) the health authority where the main goal of the organization is to cover up the abuse/harm and move families forwards.
The advocates that we all pay for in Alberta--the Health Advocates, the Seniors Advocate, the Disability Advocate, the Ombudsman and even the folks at the Human Rights Commission can't do anything because they are part of the circular loop of incompetence, no transparency and no accountability that is the system in Alberta.
The situation will not be improved in Alberta because if we hired the NDP folks and they won't fix this situation do y'all think that the next hires of the UCP folks will do anything? It's easy to talk about abuse, harm and such like when the political party is in opposition but once in power the political party is only interested in being retained by voters and if this means covering up harm, abuse and fatality in the system, why that's just peachy.
In this case, there were multiple families who are now doing a lawsuit. This may be the only way that change will happen but even here I am not sanguine as the justice system is notoriously slow and cumbersome; costs are high and it's very stressful on the survivors of this trauma in care.
My advice to all families who go through this sort of hell is simple. Don't stay silent. The only real justice you will get is to factually report the events and be part of the narrative of failures of the provincial governments all over Canada who did not act on behalf of the most vulnerable but only PRETENDED to be caring, responsive and protective. It's a sham. Defend your own.
But don't forget. There are always good people in the world. Some of them are willing to help you like Ruth Adria of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society and get no awards of any sort from the government of Alberta.

A Maple family is suing Mackenzie Health Centre in Richmond Hill after, Sonja Shirdan, 90, was sexually assaulted at the hospital. A personal support worker faced…
YORKREGION.COM

https://www.yorkregion.com/news-story/7571516--a-pattern-of-negligence-relatives-of-elderly-sex-assault-victim-speak-out/

'A pattern of negligence': relatives of elderly sex assault victim speak out

Ran Shirdan says his grandmother was badly bruised, unable to speak after assault at Mackenzie Health




NEWS Oct 19, 2017 by Jeremy Grimaldi  Vaughan Citizen



Speaking Out

Ran Shirdan and his mother, Eva, are speaking out after Ran's grandmother was allegedly sexually assaulted by a personal support worker at Mackenzie Health Centre. Sept. 7, 2017. - Mike Barrett/Metroland

Soja Zadeh
Soja Zadeh walks into the Newmarket courthouse. May 31, 2017 - Susie Kockerscheidt/Metroland
 
Speaking Out
Sonja (seated), Eva and Ran Shirdan during happier times. - Photo courtesy Ran Shirdan
 
Sonja Shirdan after the alleged attack
Sonja Shirdan laying in a Mackenzie Health hospital bed after the alleged attack that left her bruised, non-verbal with permanently clenched fists. - Facebook/Ran Shirdan
1 / 4
"The true measure of any society can be found in how it treats its most vulnerable members." – activist Mahatma Gandhi

Is the system broken?  Are we failing our most vulnerable? This is one article in an ongoing series by Metroland Media, York Region examining these questions - and talking to the people who are working for change.

Ran Shirdan remembers it clear as day, walking into Mackenzie Health to see his grandmother Sonja Shirdan, 90, and witnessing the state of his best friend, his Savta — the Hebrew word for a particularly cool grandmother.
“She had stopped talking entirely,” the 30-year-old Maple resident said. “She had clenched fists over her all the time, one over her chest and one over her crotch.”
But this wasn’t all, Sonja had bruised lips and arms, black, blue and purple and a clenched jaw. She could not fall asleep.
For months after the incident, which occurred in September 2015, Ran and his mother Eva Shirdan did their best to help Sonja recuperate, prodding the formerly talkative senior citizen to say something, anything. They had nominal luck.
“It felt like we were in the presence of someone whose soul had been sucked out … she was a shell of herself,” Ran added.
It wasn’t until two months later they’d find out the ghastly reason why Sonja was so agitated. She’d been raped while in hospital.
Yet finding out all the details from Mackenzie Health management proved similarly trying.
The process began with a barrage of phone calls, up to seven a day, from one hospital manager who repeatedly failed to leave a message.
Finally, after receiving nearly 20 calls, Eva, who explained she rarely returns calls from unknown numbers, called the number and reached Mackenzie Health’s operation director for emergency, medicine and critical care, Heather Riddell.
Eva was told, “We’d like to share what went wrong with your mother."
“I was so happy because they usually try and hide (those things),” she said. “I had convinced myself that she took the wrong medication.”
On Nov. 26, Eva walked into a hospital conference room, where several hospital representatives were seated: Riddell, Charmaine Ambrose, a patient care manager; Dr. Victoria Chan, chief of medicine; and an administrative assistant. The following is her account of what happened at that meeting.
After 30 minutes of talk about her mother’s current condition, she said the women got up and were about to leave, when she interrupted:
“Wait … you still haven’t told me what happened?”
To which they responded: “Do you really want to know?”
She was eventually told how, months previous, a Mackenzie Health nurse walked into her mother’s semiprivate room to find the curtains drawn around her bed. When they were pulled back, a hospital personal support worker was seen “aggressively sucking” on Sonja’s breasts.
When Eva asked what else occurred, she was told “other things … you don’t want to know, it was horrible."
One person present said members of the hospital's senior leadership team, including president and CEO Altaf Stationwalla and vice-president, chief operating officer and chief nursing executive Susan Kowlek had been made aware of the incident, Eva says. 
When she asked what the police said, she was told management decided not to call police because sexual assault charges would jeopardize the hospital’s reputation. The hospital said in a later statement its policy at the time was to report allegations to police only with the consent of the patient involved. 
When Eva suggested calling the police, she said they told her, “There’s no point in you doing it now, because your mother will not tell them anything anyway and it’s been such a long time.”
They added that because it had been more than two months since the incident, the police would not be able find physical evidence.
Another alleged victim's daughter — who spoke to yorkregion.com for an earlier investigation into how Mackenzie Health handled sexual assault charges — would eventually report the incident to police.
In the ensuing days, Eva was again inundated with phone calls from the hospital, totalling about 12 messages asking her to call back, she said.
This time she did not call back. Instead she spoke to a lawyer and then the police, giving them a videotaped statement of what had occurred.
York Regional Police would go on to charge personal support worker Soja Zadeh with 13 sexual assault charges. The alleged victims totalled six and included patients at Mackenzie Health as well as other locations where Zadeh worked after he was fired from the hospital.
According to York Regional Police Information to obtain documents, once police began their probe into the alleged sexual assaults, hospital management refused to give simple information to officers and forced them to seek judicial authorization for information including the names of the other victims.
The information and opinions in the court documents have not been tested in court, but are the police’s record of their investigation and interviews.
According to those documents, Ambrose refused to admit to the police that Zadeh’s actions were “sexual in nature” instead calling them “inappropriate and rough”.
Mackenzie Health’s director of quality and risk management Wendy Hooper denied the hospital had done anything wrong by keeping the alleged sex assaults from the police.
“If given the chance to do things over in this incident, Wendy Hooper would not do anything differently and would still not contact police in regards to the sexual assault allegations,” York police Const. Stephanie Couture wrote.
In May, the Crown dropped all the charges against Zadeh in a deal that had him avoid trial by pleading guilty to one assault charge, involving a slap on the rear end of an anonymous female patient at the hospital.
The Shirdans learned of the deal days later and said the Crown told them there was insufficient evidence and the victims had “frailties”.
At least two families, including the Shirdans, are now suing the hospital.
Ran posted a Facebook message about the hospital’s actions that went viral and was shared more than 28,000 times. He is pressuring “anyone who will listen” to achieve four main goals:
1.  A regulatory body for PSWs
2.  An admission of fault and apology from Mackenzie Health
3.  That all executives who knew about the alleged sex assaults to lose their jobs
4.  An explanation by The Crown as to why the charges were dropped
“There’s a pattern of negligence when it comes to caring for our elders,” he said. “This isn’t about us, it’s about everyone. When you are brought to the hospital you are weak, it’s supposed to be a safe haven. There could be a pedophile in our hospitals too, but we would never know if every situation was treated like this.”
Despite repeated requests, Health Minister Eric Hoskins refused a chance to be interviewed on the subject.
The ministry sent a statement, saying it "upholds a zero-tolerance policy for any sexual abuse of patients and expects all health system partners to do the same."
"It is the ministry’s expectation that hospitals will appropriately notify police of any potential criminal matters involving patients that take place within their facilities, prioritizing the safety and well-being of patients at all times," the statement says. "The ministry is now exploring options for a more rigorous registry that provides PSWs, employers and the public with the information they need to ensure that the care they are receiving from their PSW is competent and safe."
Mackenzie Health representatives also declined to be interviewed or comment on this specific incident. The hospital did release a statement, which said it has revised its policies and now requires all allegations of criminal behaviour at the hospital to be immediately reported to police.
Sonja died on March 7, 2017. Her physician told the family said her health began to decline after the assault.
Despite her family's best efforts, they never managed to unclench her hands.



A Maple family is suing Mackenzie Health Centre in Richmond Hill after, Sonja Shirdan, 90, was sexually assaulted at the hospital. A personal support worker faced multiple charges but avoided...
YORKREGION.CO

LikeShow more reactions
Comment
Comments
Lynn Steele-Opswa My heart goes out to you Havi. You are always in my thoughts and prayers for healing your sorrow, and strength to keep fighting for her 💚

Reply
2
22 hrs
Manage
Violette Golan Unthinkable. So terrible

Reply
1
20 hrs
Manage
Cat Shilova I lack words to tell the horror I feel every time I read about what happened to your dear mother. And the anger against the man who has done that, and the anger against the hospital, shame on them. Be brave, as I know you are and go on with this battle until you win. Because you will win.

Reply
1
14 hrs
Manage
Julie Ali This trauma is happening all over Canada. Government is complicit by its lack of action. The only way these failures will end is for families to speak about these failures and document them. Ruth Adria of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society has been documenting system wide failures in Alberta for decades. The PCs were failures and now the NDP folks are failures. It's troubling but without families speaking and courting retribution (evictions, bannings and lawsuits that are used to shut them out) government will not do its job.

ReplyJust now
Manage