have you made a war out of your heart?

Saturday, August 11, 2012

have you made a war out of your heart?


have you learned your lessons as well as you could have?
have you poured yourself out entirely and made not a drop
of your soul an acid throw? have you given your mask away
a dozen times and shown yourself naked to the beloved? and if not
why not? the world aches for this sort of courage and you have failed
if you have not done any of these works

have you grown a garden of words and laid the root cellar full of your harvest?
have you gone out into the world and faced each lie with your sword and cut down
as much of that thicket down? have you made a war out of your heart? have you taken
down all those who would harm the ones who are powerless? have you been shield and cry?
have you done the good work? and if not why not? why have you not spoken up and given your blood
for the cause which is the cause of all of mankind? why have you not laid your life on the line?

the line of poetry the line of language the line of acts of courage?
why have you stayed silent while the homeless walked by your home?
why have you not spoken for the hungry? why have you kept quiet when we have been lied to?
why have you not taken out your soul from its burial ground and given it up in life to do the work
of love? I ask you this not to make you ashamed or restless I ask you this because I am curious
how can you let your children live and yet keep silent when their children die?

how can you do this?

Sunday, September 21, 2014

--The Prentice dude seems to indicate that we won't have the Michener Centre touched but then you wrote an e-mail that seems to say that it will be closed but in a slow molasses way until voters lose interest and the government can do the dirty work and kill off more of these folks. Now what is the truth? Can you tell me? I want to put the good news or bad news on my blog-------------------So is the Michener Centre open or closed? ---------Just before Prentice announced his decision, Michener families received an email saying the transition would continue, only more slowly. It spoke of “extended timelines” but did not say the closure had been cancelled. The letter pledged adherence to United Nations protocols for placing people in the community rather than institutions (although Michener is now an award-winning institution, and people actually want to stay there.) The letter, over the signature of associate minister Naresh Bhardwaj, contradicted both the tone and content of the premier’s announcement. Then there was hell to pay. Prentice’s office curtly said the letter was “a mistake.” Human Services said Bhardwaj had not seen the letter or approved the contents — in itself a remarkable fact, if that’s what it is. The new senior minister of human services, Heather Klimchuk, promised that the premier’s goals will be met — there will be no forced transition and no closure.---------



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "jyali" <jyali@
To: "edmonton ellerslie" <edmonton.ellerslie@assembly.ab.ca>, "edmonton glenora" <edmonton.glenora@assembly.ab.ca>, investigations@metronews.ca, edmonton@globalnews.ca, "Margo Goodhand (Edm Journal)" <mgoodhand@edmontonjournal.com>, gthomson@edmontonjournal.com, newsroom@globeandmail.com, info@oag.ab.ca, infomedia@oag-bvg.gc.ca, "Office of The City Auditor" <city.auditor@edmonton.ca>
Cc: "edmonton whitemud" <edmonton.whitemud@assembly.ab.ca>, "edmonton highlandsnorwood" <edmonton.highlandsnorwood@assembly.ab.ca>, "edmonton rutherford" <edmonton.rutherford@assembly.ab.ca>, "edmonton meadowlark" <edmonton.meadowlark@assembly.ab.ca>, "edmonton castledowns" <edmonton.castledowns@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary elbow" <calgary.elbow@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary greenway" <calgary.greenway@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary west" <calgary.west@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary acadia" <calgary.acadia@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary hays" <calgary.hays@assembly.ab.ca>, "west yellowhead" <west.yellowhead@assembly.ab.ca>, "lethbridge west" <lethbridge.west@assembly.ab.ca>, "draytonvalley devon" <draytonvalley.devon@assembly.ab.ca>, "highwood" <highwood@assembly.ab.ca>, "stephen harper" <stephen.harper@parl.gc.ca>, "james rajotte" <james.rajotte@parl.gc.ca>, "thomas mulcair" <thomas.mulcair@parl.gc.ca>, "justin trudeau" <justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca>, "elizabeth may" <elizabeth.may@parl.gc.ca>, "don iveson" <don.iveson@edmonton.ca>, "Bryan Anderson" <bryan.anderson@edmonton.ca>, "tony caterina" <tony.caterina@edmonton.ca>, "Stewart Shields" <lagran@shaw.ca>, "Jessica Ernst" <magog@sasktel.net>, "Velvet Martin" <johnvel@telus.net>, "Diana Daunheimer" <dianadaun@gmail.com>, "Darren Boisvert" <elephanttimes@gmail.com>
Sent: Sunday, September 21, 2014 11:31:20 PM
Subject: Michener centre closure ----------“You’re not just the premier for people who agree with you, but you’re the premier for every single person who lives here. “It’s your responsibility to stand up, certainly for the people who are most vulnerable and disadvantaged in our society. “It’s not about public policy and it’s not about institutions. It’s about families and protecting these people.”

Dear Mr. Naresh Bhardwaj,

So I am confused.
First Mr. Prentice says that he has the brains to see the Tory voters like the mummies in Riverbend who vote reliably Tory decade after decade--- are mad as hell and won't take it anymore ---and says these immortal words that we haven't heard with reference to the most disadvantaged citizens in Alberta since the Klein error:

http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/politics/Braid+Prentice+cleanup+duty+entire+government+turn+around/10219760/story.html

“You’re not just the premier for people who agree with you, but you’re the premier for every single person who lives here.
“It’s your responsibility to stand up, certainly for the people who are most vulnerable and disadvantaged in our society.
“It’s not about public policy and it’s not about institutions. It’s about families and protecting these people.”

********************************
The Prentice dude seems to indicate that we won't have the Michener Centre touched but then you wrote an e-mail that seems to say that it will be closed but in a slow molasses way until voters lose interest and the government can do the dirty work and kill off more of these folks. 

Now what is the truth?
Can you tell me?
I want to put the good news or bad news on my blog
.
I have been writing about the dirty deeds  of the Tories with respect to our most vulnerable citizens who cannot speak for themselves (and so I have been speaking for them).
I want to know what the intentions of the government of Alberta are because you never know.
One moment the sky is blue.
Then the next minute the sky is red.
What color is the sky today with reference to the Michener Centre?
Is it purple?

I will send this letter to the Glenora MLA so that she can check your response which seems to alter from day to day.
I mean this is what I read in the newspaper:

http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/politics/Braid+Prentice+cleanup+duty+entire+government+turn+around/10219760/story.html

Just before Prentice announced his decision, Michener families received an email saying the transition would continue, only more slowly. It spoke of “extended timelines” but did not say the closure had been cancelled.
The letter pledged adherence to United Nations protocols for placing people in the community rather than institutions (although Michener is now an award-winning institution, and people actually want to stay there.)
The letter, over the signature of associate minister Naresh Bhardwaj, contradicted both the tone and content of the premier’s announcement.
*****************************************************************

So I am curious.
How on earth would this e-mail have got out?
Were you trying to trip the Prentice guy?
Are you back stabbing the premier?
I mean I am not in favor of the Prentice guy but I am not part of his team and yet, I would expect that the team would be loyal.
You don't sound loyal.
Was this e-mail written by magic?
Do you have ghostwriters?
How would e-mails go out like this ---without you knowing about it?
I mean I would expect you lock your computer every day after work don't you?
So this must mean that you wrote the e-mail that got the Michener Centre families all shook up and then when the Prentice guy found out that you were wrecking all the good news he was shining over the citizens, then you retracted your dumb e-mail as noted here:

http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/politics/Braid+Prentice+cleanup+duty+entire+government+turn+around/10219760/story.html

Then there was hell to pay.
Prentice’s office curtly said the letter was “a mistake.” Human Services said Bhardwaj had not seen the letter or approved the contents — in itself a remarkable fact, if that’s what it is.
The new senior minister of human services, Heather Klimchuk, promised that the premier’s goals will be met — there will be no forced transition and no closure.
By 4:15 p.m. Friday, Michener families were receiving an apologetic email, again citing Bhardwaj’s name, saying the initial note was a mistake, sent in error. The premier’s wishes will prevail.
****************************************************************************

I have to say that you are not very bright.
The program is clear to me but not to you.
Mr. Prentice is bright enough to see that the Progressive Conservative Party of Alberta is in the toilet and about to be flushed away by the voters.
Hence he is actually listening to us now.
He is obedient to the masses (at least until he gets elected).
Which is a remarkable thing in itself but desperate politicians will actually do this.
Harper and crew aren't desperate yet and do the dumb thing of ratifying the FIPA business.
But soon, they will realize their mistake and promise middle class families tax reductions to make up for the fact that we are now Chinese citizens.
It won't work but there you go.

As for you?
I would suggest you get with the program.
What program?
The program that is clearly understood by Mr. Prentice.
Start doing your job of helping people with disabilities such as my handicapped sister who has been nearly killed off at the Good Samaritan extended care facility due to the failures of patient care based funding.
Start thinking about the unemployment lines when we --Tory voters--get riled up enough to go work for the opposition parties.
Start answering our questions and stop messing with these poor families at the Michener Centre.
Stop messing with the Michener families --they have lots of friends who will  yap endlessly on blogs about them.

Now what is the truth?
Is this place closing or not?


Sincerely,

Julie Ali





http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/politics/Braid+Prentice+cleanup+duty+entire+government+turn+around/10219760/story.html

Braid: Prentice is on cleanup duty, but he has an entire government to turn around

BY DON BRAID, CALGARY HERALD SEPTEMBER 20, 2014
17
  • STORY
  • PHOTOS ( 1 )

Braid: Prentice is on cleanup duty, but he has an entire government to turn around

Premier Jim Prentice a lot of work left to do if he wants to get the PC Party back on good terms with the people of Alberta.

Photograph by: Gavin Young Gavin Young , Calgary Herald

Premier Jim Prentice is doing everything in his power to clean up the messes in the PC puppy park, sometimes against resistance in his own government.
This week, Prentice promised to sell the government’s air fleet. He cancelled new licence plates. He abandoned flawed reform bills for civil service pensions.
And on Friday, he made a crucial decision that showed humanity and ethics can sometimes overcome both bad bureaucracy and partisan hatred.
Prentice promised that no more handicapped Albertans will be kicked out of Red Deer’s Michener Centre. And Michener will never be closed “on my watch,” he vowed.
Prentice thus hands a victory not just to Michener residents and families, but to the opposition, especially Wildrose and the NDP.
For two years, they’ve walked with the angels against this appalling government program to forcibly “transition” severely handicapped people who have lived much of their lives at Michener.
The PC government’s resistance to the humane pleas of political opponents showed just how stuck they were on refusing to admit any wrong, any error at all.
Worst of all, the whole program was a betrayal from the start.
In 2008, the Progressive Conservatives promised Michener would not close until the last resident no longer needed it. By 2013, that had changed to “transition” and closure.
The government lied. The government broke a solemn vow. Under pressure, the PC government admitted none of this.
Now, Prentice has shattered that dangerous dynamic with one stroke. He says the decision to keep Michener open is simply ethical and right, beyond politics and partisanship.
And, in an interview, he adds words that many Albertans have been waiting to hear: “You’re not just the premier for people who agree with you, but you’re the premier for every single person who lives here.
“It’s your responsibility to stand up, certainly for the people who are most vulnerable and disadvantaged in our society.
“It’s not about public policy and it’s not about institutions. It’s about families and protecting these people.”
Prentice doesn’t need to add what’s obviously true; these people needed protecting against their own provincial government — today, his government.
Even now, resistance runs deep. It showed Friday in a dramatic way that caused eruptions in the Human Services Department.
Just before Prentice announced his decision, Michener families received an email saying the transition would continue, only more slowly. It spoke of “extended timelines” but did not say the closure had been cancelled.
The letter pledged adherence to United Nations protocols for placing people in the community rather than institutions (although Michener is now an award-winning institution, and people actually want to stay there.)
The letter, over the signature of associate minister Naresh Bhardwaj, contradicted both the tone and content of the premier’s announcement.
Then there was hell to pay.
Prentice’s office curtly said the letter was “a mistake.” Human Services said Bhardwaj had not seen the letter or approved the contents — in itself a remarkable fact, if that’s what it is.
The new senior minister of human services, Heather Klimchuk, promised that the premier’s goals will be met — there will be no forced transition and no closure.
By 4:15 p.m. Friday, Michener families were receiving an apologetic email, again citing Bhardwaj’s name, saying the initial note was a mistake, sent in error. The premier’s wishes will prevail.
“That’s all very confusing to us,” said Michael Dawe, guardian to a resident. “What are we supposed to think?”
One thing we can think, without any fear of being wrong, is that Prentice doesn’t just have a cabinet and a caucus to turn around.
There’s a whole government out there, lying in wait.
Don Braid’s column appears regularly in theHeralddbraid@calgaryhHerald.com

but break it / with the recognition

and push through the barrier
which is inside you only
the mind creates
the wall
and you are to use your will
to surmount the obstacle

what wall keeps you silent?
what wall keeps you unhappy?
what wall holds you to a life that is false?
choose the wall and its name
but break it
with the recognition   that the wall is inside your mind


and push through the barrier
that is within you
understand fear is simply something you feel
and cannot hold you imprisoned any longer
understand that the mind that is a jail
can also set you free

what wall keeps you silent?
what wall keeps you unhappy?
what wall holds you to a life that is false?
choose the wall and its name
but break it
with the recognition   that the wall is inside your mind


and push through the barrier
which is all about pain
take the great hammer of your will
and slam through the imaginary fence around your life
only you keep yourself penned and obedient
only the prescriptions of our society treat you into conformity


  what wall keeps you silent?
what wall keeps you unhappy?
what wall holds you to a life that is false?
choose the wall and its name
but break it
with the recognition   that the wall is inside your mind


and push through the barrier
of what has never been done   to do what must be done
you must create a new path
so that the future is realized
in each step you take    think 
you are merely making dots on a line that projects into infinity 



the soul from silence

and make a place
where you might sing
make the song
to wake you up
so that you might lead

and make a place
where you might sing
yourself into being
refuse intimidation
preach kindness on your knees

and make a place
where you might sing
let the song be soft
and yet impossibly
let it be heard by everyone

and make a place
where you might sing
tell the chickadees the skeleton
of the words   the bones of the shame 
so that they might be mournful

and make a place
where you might sing
let the blue jays rip the blue sheets
of the songbooks of the firs   let the pileated woodpecker
beat on the drum of the snag

and make a place
where you might sing
the soul from silence
into a new beginning
let the red winged blackbirds repeat the refrain


and make a place
where you might sing
a harvest of song
give the harvest out
feed the world with poetry


the power of the people is greater than the people in power------------Owen Madden, the climate campaigner for the Western Canada Wilderness Committee, said Canadians have been far too easy on their politicians when it comes to that issue. "Especially next year being a federal election time, start demanding climate leadership from your representative," he said. "Start asking them what are they going to do on climate? What's their party position on climate?"-------

the power of the people
is greater than the people in power

even if we are only powerful
every four years

we get to kick the traitors out
and when we do this let us smile widely

let us hold up our hands with the placards saying
we wish you were staying (not)

the power of the people
is greater than the people in power

energize yourself
to teach your children what to do

as the climate changes
teach them to work hard for democratic representation

show them the bullies in the legislature of crimes
teach them Tory means entitlement


the power of the people
is greater than the people in power

we go to elections soon
ask the candidate his views about climate change

and if he cannot elucidate a proper stance
take your ballot and teach them the ways of the people

which are modest
we merely reap a four year harvest


the power of the people
is greater than the people in power


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/un-climate-summit-vancouver-joins-thousands-in-worldwide-rallies-1.2773535

UN Climate Summit: Vancouver joins thousands in worldwide rallies

People across the world take to the streets in advance of UN summit to enourage leaders to take more action

CBC News Posted: Sep 21, 2014 2:28 PM PT Last Updated: Sep 21, 2014 4:04 PM PT
More than a thousand people jammed the CBC Plaza for a rally and march in support of global action on climate change in advance of a UN summit Tuesday.
More than a thousand people jammed the CBC Plaza for a rally and march in support of global action on climate change in advance of a UN summit Tuesday. (Jeff Harrington/CBC)
0 shares


Facebook



Twitter



Reddit



Google



Share



Email

More than 1,000 Vancouverites filled the CBC Plaza on Sunday, joining hundreds of thousands more around the world as 125 world leaders prepare to converge on New York City Tuesday in an historic UN summit on climate change.
New York City climate change rally
Tens of thousands filled the streets of New York City in what organizers say may be one of the largest climate change rallies ever held in the U.S. (Michael Poland/Twitter)
Rallies are underway or have happened in New York City, London, Berlin, Paris, Rio, Toronto and Seattle. More than 2,000 events were registered in more than 130 countries.
The Vancouver, the event billed as the People's Climate March, saw crowds gathering in the plaza prior to marching through downtown Vancouver  Organizers provided music and DJs,  which helped contribute to the event's largely festive mood.

People's call to action

Rally participants say they hope this kind of worldwide support will move nations closer to global agreements to reduce greenhouse gas pollution.
Climate change rally Vancouver
Rally participants expressed concern over the Northern Gateway Pipeline and the city's nexus as a port facilitating the movement of coal and oil. (Jeff Harrington/CBC)
Owen Madden, the climate campaigner for the Western Canada Wilderness Committee, said Canadians have been far too easy on their politicians when it comes to that issue.
"Especially next year being a federal election time, start demanding climate leadership from your representative," he said. "Start asking them what are they going to do on climate? What's their party position on climate?"
people in the Vancouver area have special reason to be concerned because of pressures to start expanding coal, gas and oil industries along the coast.
One of the rally's organizers, Shirley Samples, said in a news release that as a port, the city “stands as an important gateway for a flood of oil, coal and LNG that would contribute substantially to increasing CO2 emissions to record levels."
Samples also criticized Prime Minister Stephen Harper's decision to skip the summit.
“The fact that our own prime minister is not attending this summit underlines the need for Canadians to take to the streets to send a clear message to Mr. Harper: Canadians understand climate change and we know that you have us on the wrong path," she said.
With files from the CBC's Jeff Harrington


Dear Mr. Rajotte, It was wrong to ratify the FIPA with China. There is trouble ahead for Canadians. I have no faith in this big bully nation behaving legally in the international community; it will make mincemeat of us in trade domestically. I believe you have all sold off our non-renewable resources to the lowest bidder at the encouragement of the rapacious oil and gas industry. You are all fools. Our kids will pay for the failures of this government.



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "jyali" <jyali@
To: "james rajotte" <james.rajotte@parl.gc.ca>, "Margo Goodhand (Edm Journal)" <mgoodhand@edmontonjournal.com>, gthomson@edmontonjournal.com, investigations@metronews.ca, edmonton@globalnews.ca, newsroom@globeandmail.com, "edmonton whitemud" <edmonton.whitemud@assembly.ab.ca>, "edmonton highlandsnorwood" <edmonton.highlandsnorwood@assembly.ab.ca>, "edmonton rutherford" <edmonton.rutherford@assembly.ab.ca>, "edmonton meadowlark" <edmonton.meadowlark@assembly.ab.ca>, "edmonton castledowns" <edmonton.castledowns@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary elbow" <calgary.elbow@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary greenway" <calgary.greenway@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary west" <calgary.west@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary acadia" <calgary.acadia@assembly.ab.ca>, "calgary hays" <calgary.hays@assembly.ab.ca>, "west yellowhead" <west.yellowhead@assembly.ab.ca>, "lethbridge west" <lethbridge.west@assembly.ab.ca>, "draytonvalley devon" <draytonvalley.devon@assembly.ab.ca>, "gerry protti" <gerry.protti@aer.ca>, "jim ellis" <jim.ellis@aer.ca>, "don iveson" <don.iveson@edmonton.ca>, "Bryan Anderson" <bryan.anderson@edmonton.ca>, "tony caterina" <tony.caterina@edmonton.ca>
Cc: "stephen harper" <stephen.harper@parl.gc.ca>, "james rajotte" <james.rajotte@parl.gc.ca>, "thomas mulcair" <thomas.mulcair@parl.gc.ca>, "justin trudeau" <justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca>, "elizabeth may" <elizabeth.may@parl.gc.ca>, "Stewart Shields" <lagran@shaw.ca>, "Jessica Ernst" <magog@sasktel.net>, "Diana Daunheimer" <dianadaun@gmail.com>, "Velvet Martin" <johnvel@telus.net>, "Diana Daunheimer" <dianadaun@gmail.com>, "Darren Boisvert" <elephanttimes@gmail.com>
Sent: Sunday, September 21, 2014 8:05:02 PM
Subject: How FIPAs are used It is difficult to measure the economic benefits of FIPAs, as the positive impacts of FIPAs are realized over time, whether in the form of enhanced investment flows or bilateral relations in general.


Dear Mr. Rajotte,

It was wrong to ratify the FIPA with China.
There is trouble ahead for Canadians.
I have no faith in this big bully nation behaving legally in the international community; it will make mincemeat of us in trade domestically.
I believe you have all sold off our non-renewable resources to the lowest bidder at the encouragement of the rapacious oil and gas industry.
You are all fools.
Our kids will pay for the failures of this government.
This government is only interested in getting money for the oil and gas industry which wants Chinese capital and cheap Chinese labor to work the oilsands.
The good stuff is gone in Alberta.
Now we have the hard stuff to extract by fracking and it costs big bucks to do this work.
This is the only reason that we are doing a long term agreement (about the same length of a mining project) with China.
You have all lost any principles you ever had and its is all about the money now.
Shame on you all.

You do not represent me.
Who do you represent?
The Chinese.
It is very appropriate to call the Conservative party the Communist party.

Sincerely,
Julie Ali

http://readingchildrensbooks.blogspot.ca/2014/09/van-harten-said-fipa-is-practically-one.html


Sunday, September 21, 2014

-rollandmiller • 8 days ago Nonsense to sign a trade deal in SECRET,Criminal in fact. Canadians demand all trade deals be debated and voted upon in Parlament. 31 •Share › Avatar no_name rollandmiller • 8 days ago Can you say Dictatorship? 20 •Share › ----------------- Colleen Moore Heisenberg • 8 days ago China and its foreign investors aren't interested in laws only interest appears when it is to their benefit. Hong Kong is facing much unrest from its people for it undemocratic ways and for this Harper rewards China. Way to go Harper, a way to go out. Is there honor among thieves?--------------------Garfield gilbert marks • 6 days ago I don't know which part of this thread this fits better so I'll put it here. Stephen Harper grew up in *Toronto. His Dad worked on St. Clair Avenue when Esso's head office was there. As a child of an Employee his College (in Alberta?) would have been paid for by Exxon. The West Wants In Logo was a Reform Gesture to gather votes as no one would have Elected him if he said *Hi I'm Steve and I'm from Toronto, Vote for ME !!!! " would they? I'm surprised, stunned even, that Exxon would let him Lock in Alberta's Resources for *31 Years to China!! while Parliament is on another Holiday of 3-4 a year they get. But time will tell. Clearly he has to be **thrown out and we have to take back our Democracy and replace all the Lackies who get Pensions for life after 2 terms in office and have so damaged our Democracy and affected the futures of our Kids and Grandkids. Hopefully NOW people will get out an Vote these traitors out. Put them on a Wooden Boat and drop them in the Arctic. He's so interested in that, give him a Parachute.-------------Van Harten said FIPA is practically a one-way deal in favour of China, and Ottawa needs to acknowledge the non-reciprocal aspects of the deal and explain why they would ratify it two years after it was first signed.-------"It seems to me the federal government has conceded to China under pressure to give them this treaty," said Van Harten. "My guess is this is the price China has demanded to open its purse strings for investing in the resource sector in Canada."----------"We have public liability in a private setting and that violates the basic precepts of Canada's judicial system," he said.

-rollandmiller • 8 days ago Nonsense to sign a trade deal in SECRET,Criminal in fact. Canadians demand all trade deals be debated and voted upon in Parlament. 31 •Share › Avatar no_name rollandmiller • 8 days ago Can you say Dictatorship? 20 •Share › ----------------- Colleen Moore Heisenberg • 8 days ago China and its foreign investors aren't interested in laws only interest appears when it is to their benefit. Hong Kong is facing much unrest from its people for it undemocratic ways and for this Harper rewards China. Way to go Harper, a way to go out. Is there honor among thieves?--------------------Garfield gilbert marks • 6 days ago I don't know which part of this thread this fits better so I'll put it here. Stephen Harper grew up in *Toronto. His Dad worked on St. Clair Avenue when Esso's head office was there. As a child of an Employee his College (in Alberta?) would have been paid for by Exxon. The West Wants In Logo was a Reform Gesture to gather votes as no one would have Elected him if he said *Hi I'm Steve and I'm from Toronto, Vote for ME !!!! " would they? I'm surprised, stunned even, that Exxon would let him Lock in Alberta's Resources for *31 Years to China!! while Parliament is on another Holiday of 3-4 a year they get. But time will tell. Clearly he has to be **thrown out and we have to take back our Democracy and replace all the Lackies who get Pensions for life after 2 terms in office and have so damaged our Democracy and affected the futures of our Kids and Grandkids. Hopefully NOW people will get out an Vote these traitors out. Put them on a Wooden Boat and drop them in the Arctic. He's so interested in that, give him a Parachute.-------------Van Harten said FIPA is practically a one-way deal in favour of China, and Ottawa needs to acknowledge the non-reciprocal aspects of the deal and explain why they would ratify it two years after it was first signed.-------"It seems to me the federal government has conceded to China under pressure to give them this treaty," said Van Harten. "My guess is this is the price China has demanded to open its purse strings for investing in the resource sector in Canada."----------"We have public liability in a private setting and that violates the basic precepts of Canada's judicial system," he said.

and here is summer licking her lips
glowing crimson

and here are the dogs barking
as the people walk the streets

and here are the devoted
at the empty cardboard boxes praying

and here is Harper and crew
explaining to us that FIPA is good for us

and here is the evidence
of the reverse

****************************
It is pretty clear to me the Tories sold us out in order to get the money needed by their real employers in the oil and gas industry.
The oil and gas industry needs money for development of the fracking fields.
The easy good stuff is gone.
Now they need the capital to do the fracking business and most of the capital isn't in the USA which is tottering under debt loads only equal to that in Canada.
Nope.
The Tories see the gold.
The gold is in China.
But to get to the gold they had to give the Chinese ratification of the unpopular FIPA treaty.
What is my objection to the treaty?
1) We are signing on to work with a human rights abuser of major proportions.
We perhaps already deal with human rights abusers but not for the extent of time we are locked into relationship with this group of abusers.
And what do we get for it?
Folks from a foreign country who can take us to court if we do not abide by treaty agreements that will ensure that any project these folks can put cash into --will be pushed through--despite citizen opposition.
If that isn't a loss of sovereignty for the sake of the almighty buck than what is?
And we can thank the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada with their buddies in Alberta for this major mess.
Thanks folks.
We can only pay y'all back by voting y'all out.

2) The legal messes that come out of this snake pit will be resolved by future governments behind closed doors.
It won't matter what government we hire--they don't want to show us the amount of cash that wil go out the door to settle the messes created by Harper and crew laying out the red carpet now.
We are to tolerate more fiscal hemorrhages for the next three decades and our babies will pay for the idiots we have today who will do anything to let the money into the oil sands.
The failure in governance is due to the failure in the inability of the SIAs (self important asses) to think beyond a millisecond.
No sort of long term planning.
It is all four year plans.
And in this case a disaster for our kids.

3) The failure of governance which is treasonous because most Canadians have vocally opposed this treaty doesn't matter to the Tories because we don't matter. This treason should be expected by now.
This government has to be the worst government possible.
Is there any way to say how bad this government is?
Weak.
Stupid.
Arrogant.
Unable to see beyond its own belly button.
What we need is a whole pile of Conservative families yapping night and day to Harper and crew to say we're not buying FIPA even if he is.
It makes me so mad to see Mr. Rajotte failing to represent me.
I am stuck paying for a puppet.
And he's not the only puppet.
Think of Dave Hancock genuflecting to every premier we have had in existence; the guy was only able to suck up to the higher ups to get his own bread buttered.
As for the councillor--the guy is wood and we don't have sparks around to make fire.

The endless inability of our representatives  to evade their democratic duty, to follow the party line and fail to see the consequences of dumb decisions such as the ratification of FIPA is troubling and suggests we would be all better off without government.
Not only do we have to put up with their treason we have to stomach wild lies such as these:
http://www.international.gc.ca/trade-agreements-accords-commerciaux/agr-acc/fipa-apie/fipa-purpose.aspx?lang=en

Canada’s FIPA Program: Its Purpose, Objective and Content

International investment is an essential corporate strategy for many Canadian companies competing in today’s global economy. By investing abroad, companies can gain access to overseas markets, reduce input costs, secure access to key resources, acquire new technologies and provide better support to foreign customers. On the other hand, the risks of investing in a foreign country can be high. Such risks include political instability, weak legal institutions, uncertain regulatory regimes and the possibility of expropriation. For this reason, the Canadian government pursues a policy of negotiating Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreements (FIPAs) in order to provide a more transparent and predictable climate for Canadian investors abroad.
FIPAs are part of the expanding global network of bilateral investment treaties (BITs). According to the 2013 United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) World Investment Report, there are 2,857 BITs worldwide. To date, Canada has27 FIPAs in force. These FIPAs, combined with the investment obligations contained in Canada’s free trade agreements, provide protection for 56.7% of the known stock of outward direct investment of Canadian businesses at the end of 2012.
In addition to the information provided below, view the information session on FIPAs for an overview of Canada's FIPA program, including the obligations contained in the FIPA and common myths.

What is a FIPA?

A FIPA is an international treaty providing binding obligations on host governments regarding their treatment of foreign investors and investments. By setting out clear rules and an effective enforcement mechanism, a FIPA provides a stable legal framework to promote and protect foreign investment. It typically sets out a range of obligations that host governments guarantee pertaining to non-discriminatory treatment, expropriation, transfer of funds, transparency, due process and dispute settlement.
While Canada concludes FIPAs to protect Canadian investment abroad, the disciplines are reciprocal and serve to reinforce Canada as a stable and predictable destination for foreign investment. In this respect, FIPAs help enhance two-way investment flows between signatory countries.
In the absence of a FIPA, Canadian investors rely primarily on host country laws and institutions for protection, which adds a variety of risks to their ventures. While there is a general trend in favour of greater openness to foreign investment, significant country risks still exist. For instance, according to the UNCTAD 2005 World Investment Report, an unusually high number of new policies introduced by host governments in 2004 made conditions less favourable for foreign companies to enter the market and affects the domestic investment conditions more generally. This policy risk remains in today's global economy.

The importance of foreign investment

The 2013 UNCTAD World Investment Report estimates that the global stock of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) has experienced phenomenal growth over the past two decades, increasing almost tenfold from US$2.4 trillion in 1992 to US$23.6 trillion in 2012. The stock of foreign direct investment (FDI) in Canada has increased 77.7% since 2002, increasing from $357 billion in 2002 to $634 billion in 2012. In the same time, the stock of Canadian direct investment abroad (CDIA) increased from $435 billion in 2002 to $712 billion in 2012
CDIA is important for Canadian companies to take advantage of global value chains and maximize efficiencies at every step of the production process. CDIA is a tool for companies to gain access to foreign markets (for example by establishing or acquiring international distribution systems), lower their input costs, secure access to key resources (both human and natural), and acquire strategic assets (for example by acquiring leading edge technologies, specialized skill sets or better management techniques) – thereby increasing their own productivity and profitability. In the services sector, CDIA is often the most effective way of meeting the needs and expectations of foreign customers.
CDIA is beneficial to the Canadian economy, particularly over the long term. For example, CDIA contributes to increased R&D and technology spillovers to the home economy leading to productivity improvements. It can also lead to increased exports of goods and services from Canada.
Most CDIA is concentrated in the finance and natural resources sectors. In 2012, 39.9% of CDIA stock was in finance and insurance, 18.8% in mining and oil and gas extraction, 12.9% in the management of companies and enterprises, and 9.7% in manufacturing. In the same year, 28.7% of inward FDI stock in Canada was in the manufacturing sector, 19.2% in the management of companies and enterprises, 19.0% in mining and oil and gas extraction, and 13.4% in finance and insurance.

How are FIPA countries selected?

The Government identifies FIPA partners primarily on the basis of commercial factors. Countries are selected where Canadian investors would benefit most from the protections of a FIPA, for example where Canadian investment might be vulnerable given the host country’s existing investment climate. To make this assessment, a series of criteria are considered. The criteria include: commercial and economic interests, such as the current level of and future prospects for CDIA; existing investor protection, such as application of the rule of law, regulatory quality and corruption; the likelihood of engagement and of achieving a quality agreement; and trade policy or other foreign policy interests.

An instrument of protection for Canadian investors

Given the importance of international investment to the market strategies of Canadian firms, it is now more important than ever to promote a fair, open and secure environment for Canadian investment abroad. The protections provided by FIPAs address a number of key issues facing Canadian firms when investing abroad.
  • FIPAs protect investors from discrimination on the basis of nationality. This guarantee is important to ensure that a Canadian investor can compete on equal footing with other investors, both national and foreign.
  • FIPAs provide for fair and equitable treatment and full protection and security in accordance with the principles of international law. This is an undertaking to ensure that treatment does not fall below a basic international minimum standard, for example in cases where there is a lack of due process.
  • FIPAs protect against expropriation without compensation. It requires that an expropriation be for a public purpose and provides for payment of prompt, adequate and effective compensation when expropriation does takes place.
  • FIPAs guarantee the free transfer of capital and other payments relating to an investment into and out of the host country. This allows Canadian firms to make payments and repatriate their profits and capital without delay in hard currency using a market rate of exchange.
  • FIPAs address a number of other issues that can affect the operation of Canadian investments such as the right to appoint individuals to senior management positions or to use suppliers of choice.
  • FIPAs provide access to international arbitration to resolves disputes. This allows an investor to pursue a claim before an international tribunal.
While FIPAs typically contain the same type of general protections, investors should be familiar with the specific treaty provisions relating to the foreign market in which they are operating.

How FIPAs are used

It is difficult to measure the economic benefits of FIPAs, as the positive impacts of FIPAs are realized over time, whether in the form of enhanced investment flows or bilateral relations in general. The presence of a FIPA, however, is adding security for Canadian investors, and does enhance the investment climate of the host country. Recent studies analysing the impact of investment treaties find they are most effective in promoting governance and improving investor perception of the host country.
In practical terms, the existence of a FIPA and its investor-state dispute settlement mechanism reduces risks and allows an aggrieved investor to prosecute their claims before an international tribunal.
More generally, FIPAs open a channel of communication with the host country regarding measures that may affect a Canadian investor. Over the years, Canadian investors have used FIPAs to make representations to host country authorities and engage the host country in constructive consultations towards resolution of the dispute. Recourse to investor-state dispute settlement has also been made in some instances to seek redress for damages incurred.

Bottom line

FIPAs are part of the growing body of international law governing foreign investment, and Canadian investors can benefit from their protections. A Canadian investor relying on a FIPA can look to a comprehensive and specific set of obligations with recourse to international arbitration for their enforcement. The added security and predictability provided by a FIPA supports and enhances Canadian investment activities in foreign markets.

Questions and Answers about FIPAs

The answers to the following questions reflect the nature of most of Canada FIPAs. Investors should review the details of each FIPA relating to the foreign market in which they are operating.

What types of investments are covered by a FIPA?

Various forms of investment are usually covered by a FIPA. They include tangible assets, such as real estate or other property acquired for business purposes; portfolio investments or other forms of participation in a company or joint venture; intangible assets, such as goodwill; and property rights, such as intellectual property rights.

Does the FIPA eliminate restrictions to invest in the foreign country?

No. The FIPA is not an instrument of liberalization. It can, however, support the goals of liberalization. For example, most FIPAs, but not all, contain provisions that commit Parties not to adopt measures that are more restrictive with respect to investment; and not to reverse any new liberalization measures that they may adopt. That said, the FIPA does not prevent Parties from regulating in the public interest with respect to health, safety and the environment. Parties may also exempt sensitive sectors from the FIPA’s obligations.

Is minority participation in a joint venture with a local partner covered?

Yes. An equity security of an enterprise, including a joint venture, is considered to be an investment. More generally, an interest in an enterprise that entitles the owner to share in income or profits of the enterprise is considered an investment under the FIPA.

Is an investment made by a subsidiary via a third country covered?

Yes. Provided the subsidiary is owned or controlled by an investor in Canada, the investment of the subsidiary would be covered by the disciplines of the FIPA.

Does the FIPA address taxation measures?

In general, taxation measures are outside of the scope of a FIPA. Taxation matters are addressed through bilateral double taxation agreements. Canada has 86 such agreements in force and several others under negotiation. For further information visit the Department of Finance website. Canada does, however, negotiate its FIPAs on the basis that tax measures will be subject to the disciplines of the FIPA with respect to expropriation and tax measures that form part of a private investment agreement or contract between an investor and the host government.

Does a FIPA provide protection across all sectors and industries?

While a FIPA provides protection for investments in general, it does allow Parties to make exemptions from the FIPAs obligations. For example, cultural industries are typically not covered by FIPA protections.

Is the FIPA applicable to actions taken by local governments?

Yes. The FIPA applies to actions taken by all levels of government - local, provincial and federal.

Does the Department provide assistance to resolve a dispute?

The investor-state dispute settlement mechanism in a FIPA allows an investor, on its own, to pursue a claim against the host government. The Government of Canada will not be a party to a dispute launched by a Canadian investor. The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, however, can provide assistance to Canadian investors, for example in the form of diplomatic assistance in dealing with the host government or in identifying contacts in the host country. The dispute itself, however, is a legal matter between the investor and the host government.

Where do I go if I encounter a problem?

The first step in resolving an issue with a host government is to pursue the issue directly with that host government. Documenting your complaint and expressing it in clear unambiguous terms are important steps in this process. If you believe there has been a breach of a FIPA obligation, you may wish to obtain legal advice on your options concerning recourse under the FIPA. You can also contact the local Canadian Embassy. They can provide you with relevant contacts should you wish to pursue the matter further.

How long does it take to get a matter resolved by international arbitration?

Each case is different, so it is it difficult to generalize, but resolving a matter through international arbitration is a long process and can take several years.

What is the cost of arbitration?

Arbitral parties are responsible for the costs of the arbitral tribunal, payable in advance. Costs depend on the amount of time needed by the tribunal to hear and decide the case. In recent cases, the investor’s 50% share of tribunal costs has ranged between $500,000 and $1.5 million. In addition, the investor would be responsible for its own legal costs. A tribunal may award costs. For example, it may order the losing party to pay some or all of the successful party’s costs.

What countries is Canada negotiating FIPAs with?

For a comprehensive list of Canada's FIPAs, Ongoing FIPA Negotiations, and Recently Concluded FIPA Negotiations, please see theNegotiations and Agreements section.

Are there any complementary instruments available to protect Canadian investors?

Export Development Canada (EDC) is a Crown Corporation that provides financing and risk management services to Canadian exporters and investors in up to 200 markets worldwide.
EDC provides political risk insurance to Canadian businesses investing in emerging markets, including countries with which FIPAs have not yet been negotiated, protecting investors against the effects of unpredictable political events that can have an adverse impact on their foreign operations. Examples of such events include war, civil strife, terrorism, restrictions on the conversion and transfer of currency, breach of contractual obligations by foreign governments, and other foreign government interference that affects investors’ ownership rights or business operations.
EDC can also provide financing to Canadian investors or their foreign investments in support of CDIA. EDC financing support can be at the time of the investment or through-out the term of the investment.

Further Reading

  • C.D. Howe Institute, Investor Protection in the NAFTA and Beyond: Private and Public Purpose, Toronto, 2006.
  • Conference Board of Canada, “The Benefits of Foreign Direct Investment: How Investment in Both Directions Drives our Economy” Ottawa, March 2006.
  • Kinnear, Meg, Bjorklund, Andrea K, and Hannaford, John F.G., Investment Disputes Under NAFTA: An Annotated Guide to NAFTA Chapter 11. Kluwer Law International, 2006.
  • Salacuse, Jeswald and Sullivan, Nicholas, “Do BITs Really Work? An Evaluation of Bilateral Investment Treaties and Their Grand Bargain”, Harvard International Law Journal Vol 46, 2005.
  • UNCTAD, Investor-State Disputes arising from Investment Treaties: A Review. New York and Geneva, United Nations, 2005.
  • UNCTAD, World Investment Report 2005: Transnational Corporations and the Internationalization of R&D. Geneva, United Nations, 2005.
  • UNCTAD, World Investment Report 2013: Global Value Chains: Investment and Trade for Development, Geneva, United Nations, 2013.
************************************************
The truth is China has lots of cash and is a big market.
We can do business with this country without FIPA.
FIPA makes us weaker in our trade with China.
It makes China very smart and prepared to deal with us.
It gives China the upper hand.
And we can't protest when China goes to court to force through deals such as the Enbridge pipeline.
Get ready for the Chinafication of Canada folks.
We already have China in Edmonton, China in Alberta and now Chinafication goes national.

The worst part of this deal isn't the money we have to throw away in behind the door agreements for conflicts that will happen; the worst part of this deal is the long term commitment to be a partner with a human rights abuser.
That is sickening.

http://thetyee.ca/News/2014/09/13/Harper-Conceded-to-China/



I don't know which part of this thread this fits better so I'll put it here. Stephen Harper grew up in *Toronto. His Dad worked on St. Clair Avenue when Esso's head office was there. As a child of an Employee his College (in Alberta?) would have been paid for by Exxon. The West Wants In Logo was a Reform Gesture to gather votes as no one would have Elected him if he said *Hi I'm Steve and I'm from Toronto, Vote for ME !!!! " would they? I'm surprised, stunned even, that Exxon would let him Lock in Alberta's Resources for *31 Years to China!! while Parliament is on another Holiday of 3-4 a year they get. But time will tell. Clearly he has to be **thrown out and we have to take back our Democracy and replace all the Lackies who get Pensions for life after 2 terms in office and have so damaged our Democracy and affected the futures of our Kids and Grandkids. Hopefully NOW people will get out an Vote these traitors out. Put them on a Wooden Boat and drop them in the Arctic. He's so interested in that, give him a Parachute.



    • "non of that builds a strong caring society!"
      Sadly, it seems Alberta has become little more than a "fly-attracting carcass." A couple of cities (Calgary and Lethbridge) have been successful with their "fly swatters," having run the frac'ers out of their communities.
      Unfortunately though, it appears Calgary residents will soon find themselves downstream from a new "joint venture," and any subsequent contamination. And I would imagine Harper's 31 year "Chinada" agreement will make it a wee bit tough, and really expensive, for Calgarians to do a thing about it.
      "Alberta's Stoney Nakoda First Nation says it has signed a 'huge' deal with a Chinese petrochemical company to develop oil and gas on its land.
      The First Nation is located 60 kilometres west of Calgary and has signed a joint venture agreement with Hong Kong-based Huatong Petrochemical Holdings Ltd. to explore and develop oil and gas deposits on Stoney Nation lands.
      About 49,000 hectares of land will be explored and developed through the agreement, with Huatong providing all necessary funding — possibly hundreds of millions of dollars — and Nakoda Oil & Gas Inc. acting as the primary operator for the joint venture."
      And I can't imagine that's going to make Calgary more attractive to people.
      "... A national survey conducted in May by Calgary Economic Development (CED) found perceptions of the industry outside the city are being clouded by pipeline project delays and environmental rulings, negatively influencing people's decisions about whether to move to or do business in the city."
      "I would imagine 3/4 of the Alberta population is just passing trough to pickup a pay cheque."
      Yeah, I don't think many people like their families to sleep where they "crap."
      "Confessions of an Oil and Gas Worker: I live in Heaven, but I work in Hell…
      ... You must be asking why I still work there. I am an addict to oil and gas for my vehicles and my wages. I am slowly breaking away and the first step was to remove my family from Alberta to a safe place like New Brunswick. If Oil and Gas are allowed to run amok here like they do in Alberta, we will be moving again."


        • Avatar


          Yes 30 years to shut down the trade deal.
          The Chinese could empty any resource they may own in Canada. Most mining sites are 25 year operations.
          But what if you shipped in 100,000 Chinese miners, they could strip the earth clean, and walk away leaving us RAPED, no other way to say it!


            • Avatar


              If that refinery? or processing plant is 60 km West of Calgary, that is near the Headwater for the Bow and Elbow? plus water that flows to Lethbridge and Medicine Hat then Regina? A spill into that would be a disaster. The PM is not From there, he's From Etobicoke (Toronto) or East Toronto (Dad worked at Esso HQ on St.Clair Ave.). Aside from having an Indexed pension for life (if we don't get someone to Change that), his University was also paid by them (was standard practice for children of employees). 'Course any conflicts of interest would be declared on the 'Reform' documents wouldn't they?


            • Avatar


              I hear what you're saying Bear Code, but jailing all Albertans (many of whom are as pissed off as you) will do nothing to stop the poisoning of water supplies and communities in BC. The greed has spread.
              Heavily frac'd Hudson's Hope issues contaminated water advisory:
              Sept. 10, 2014 - "A resident, late last week, observed a substance surfacing into the Brenot Creek.
              ... The District of Hudson’s Hope is advising its residents not to use the water from Lynx Creek and Brenot Creek for drinking water, for livestock watering, and irrigation.
              ... Boiling water will not make the water potable.
              ... Abstain from using the water until further notice.
              ... At this time we cannot comment on the water quality of water wells that are within the proximity of the contaminated site."


            China and its foreign investors aren't interested in laws only interest appears when it is to their benefit. Hong Kong is facing much unrest from its people for it undemocratic ways and for this Harper rewards China. Way to go Harper, a way to go out. Is there honor among thieves?



            • Not only is FIPA a bad treaty (locked-in, no exit clause, loss of sovereignty to China, etc.) but by secretly ratifying this treaty in Cabinet PM Stephen Harper has abused his power, royal prerogative and our democracy. By shunning the parliamentary tradition of taking treaties like FIPA to parliament for debate PM Harper shows utter contempt and disrespect for our parliamentary democracy and traditions, for First Nations and for Canadians. Stop FIPA.


                • Avatar


                  I would stand by any government that said that Harper was not acting in the interest of Canada and therefore the deal as far as Canada is concerned is null and void,
                  Canada needs to tell international courts it refuses to honor this agreement and refuses to pay any penalty, if countries want to refuse to do business with us, then lets take those consequences over giving in to extortion.


                    • Avatar


                      I seem to recall that a PM can't enter into an agreement on behalf of Canada that exceeds his tenure in office. If there is no 'out' clause, I believe that's what he's doing.


                        • Avatar


                          You recall incorrectly.
                          “Once ratified, the Canada-China Investment Agreement will bind Canada, including future governments, for a minimum of 31 years. Unlike NAFTA, with an exit clause of 6 months’ notice, this agreement, also called a FIPA (Foreign Investor Protection Agreement) cannot be exited for the first 15 years. After 15 years, either country can exit on one year’s notice, but any existing investments are further protected for another 15 years.”
                          Source: Elizabeth May, MP http://elizabethmaymp.ca/news/...




                      Harper Gov't 'Conceded to China' under Pressure: Treaty Expert

                      FIPA 'is the price China demanded to open its purse strings for investing in the resource sector in Canada.'
                      By Jeremy J. Nuttall, 13 Sep 2014, TheTyee.ca
                      Fist
                      Did Canada just walk into a punch? Osgoode Hall Law School professor Gus Van Harten says FIPA is practically a one-way deal in favour of China.

                      Related

                      At one point during his nearly 20 years in China, Mark Kitto had all the success he could handle.
                      A publishing company, advertising firm and consultancy business were yielding good money and he estimates his businesses were worth about $10 million.
                      The Financial Times even referred to him as a "mini media mogul."
                      Kitto, originally from the United Kingdom, called China home for 18 years and during his time started magazines you can still purchase in the country -- only Kitto doesn't own them now.
                      As the Canadian government announced it had ratified the highly controversial Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement with Beijing, Kitto reflected on his own story.
                      In 2005 his business was taken from him by a partner who was Chinese, at the time a legal necessity for foreigners, in cahoots with the Chinese government in what has become one of the most fabled stories of expat anguish in China and the subject of Kitto's upcoming book That's China.
                      During his day in court during the dispute, Kitto managed to prove the conspiracy against him by producing a letter from the public relations arm of the communist party to his business partner instructing him to fabricate evidence for the case.
                      "In the letter that went from the state council of information office to the person they were asking to fabricate evidence included the line 'We need to teach this foreigner a lesson,'" Kitto said on the phone from England, where he now lives.
                      The judge sided with Kitto, but after taking a phone call came back and reversed the decision.
                      "I lost the case and that was that. I lost everything."
                      China had just signed on to the World Trade Organization at the time, but even as a foreign business person with a local partner he said he wasn't protected.
                      And he said he doubts Canada's deal with China would prevent others from suffering the same fate.
                      From small business to large corporations, it's the same treatment for foreign business, according to Kitto, though he said larger businesses are less likely to bellyache.
                      "There's no level playing field as far as they're concerned," he said. "Such a thing does not exist."
                      Why sign the deal?
                      Gus Van Harten is an associate professor at the Osgoode Hall Law School and an expert in investment treaties.
                      Van Harten said FIPA is practically a one-way deal in favour of China, and Ottawa needs to acknowledge the non-reciprocal aspects of the deal and explain why they would ratify it two years after it was first signed.
                      "It seems to me the federal government has conceded to China under pressure to give them this treaty," said Van Harten. "My guess is this is the price China has demanded to open its purse strings for investing in the resource sector in Canada."
                      He said China had ratified the deal right away and seemed to be getting antsy Canada had taken so long, even speculating the recent detentions of two Canadian coffee-shop owners in the country on accusations of spying may have been part of Beijing's pressure.
                      In a press release today, Ottawa insisted the deal will protect such Canadian investors in China and help build trade relations.
                      The release claims the deal will give "Canadian investors in China the same types of protections that foreign investors have long had in Canada."
                      But Van Harten doesn't buy that line.
                      "One aspect of the treaty is it has an exclusion of all existing discriminatory measures in Canada or China," he said. "China, it's safe to say, has far more existing discriminatory measures than Canada does."
                      Local government rules or different tax rates will now be locked in under the agreement, giving Chinese officials a tool to punish any Canadian investors it wishes to, he said.
                      Meanwhile, the New Democrats blasted the deal Friday afternoon.
                      "It is clear that there are some profound problems with it," trade critic Don Davies said.
                      Mark Kitto
                      Mark Kitto says his $10-million business in China was stolen under government directions.
                      He said the deal is imbalanced and subjects Canadian taxpayers to massive liabilities from Chinese companies, many state-owned, who can now sue Canadian governments.
                      And, Davies said, they can settle the cases behind closed doors if they want, even when tax dollars are on the line.
                      "We have public liability in a private setting and that violates the basic precepts of Canada's judicial system," he said.
                      Davies said the deal's 31-year timeline is also far too long of an agreement, alleging the Conservatives announced the ratification on a Friday afternoon because the party's leaders know Canadians don't support it.
                      Back in England, Kitto's experience left him wary of any claims the agreement with Beijing will end up being something from which Canada benefits.
                      Even if the agreement was completely reciprocal, he said he doubts Chinese business and government would honour it, pointing to a number of claims filed recently by foreign companies under various agreements around the world.
                      "There is no such thing as a reciprocal agreement," said Kitto of Beijing. "For them the other party signs on to the agreement, opens up and then you take advantage of them. That's the way they reciprocate."  [Tyee]
                      Read more: PoliticsFederal Politics,